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I stopped in at Verizon this morning to see if anyone made a Cell Phone with a built in active GPS. They said all of the phones now have them. I asked how to activate it. What they meant is that all of the new phones have a passive GPS so that 911 operators know where you are calling from. I wanted an active GPS so that I knew where I was. They said that they have not heard of any manufacturer making such a phone. Anyone heard of any phone like this? It sure would be convenient to take a mobile phone and have your GPS built in! Any inventors out there? :lol:
 

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Not a bad idea, a minimal function GPS should not be that much to incorporate in a cell phone and could prove useful.
I'am not an inventor but I'll buy one when they come out :wink:
 

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That is exactly what I was looking for! Now if I can only get Verizon to start carrying this I would be set. I would pay the $9.99 a month for this service.
 

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casek said:
I stopped in at Verizon this morning to see if anyone made a Cell Phone with a built in active GPS. They said all of the phones now have them. I asked how to activate it. What they meant is that all of the new phones have a passive GPS so that 911 operators know where you are calling from. I wanted an active GPS so that I knew where I was. They said that they have not heard of any manufacturer making such a phone. Anyone heard of any phone like this? It sure would be convenient to take a mobile phone and have your GPS built in! Any inventors out there? :lol:
New products are on their way in an area I called individual information center, IIC or I2C (eye to see). There are three levels of functions built into this smart phone: GPS, public advertisement (i.e., electronic billboards associated with your current coordinates) and public services (e.g., location of hospitals), and paid service (a la XM radio). should be fun.
 

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I recently read an article on cell phones with GPS that would allow you to track a teenage driver to make sure they are where they are supposed to be. According to the article, it would even alert you and them if they exceeded a pre-set speed. Going just by memory, I believe it may have been Nextel, but I'm not sure. I'll have to look to see if I can find that article again. :D
 

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Yeah many of nextel's phones have built in gps. For about 10 a month you get a service that includes maping software
 

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AT&T's GSM phones include some rudamentary location-based services, based on triangulating your location between several towers. I find it works about 50% of the time. You can do things like "Find nearest ATM," or my favorite "Find nearest Bar."

You can also locate "Friends" and then pick a meeting place between the two of you, or closer to one of the parties.

Pretty neat stuff but might not be exactly what you're looking for. I would imagine full-time active GPS might take a little too much juice to incorporate in a phone anytime soon.
 

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Nextel will sell a phone that has GPS. I recenly went to buy a Blackberry
phone from them. I wanted all the features that particular phone has but found out It doesn't have GPS capability.

The sales people recommended that if I purchased the Blackberry I should also purchase one of the models that receives GPS. That phone
would cost about $125. with a $25.00 rebate. The GPS service is provided
by TELENAV for $10.00 per month. No other monthly charges would apply, just the $10.00 per month fee.

As things happen I purchased the phone for 125. and had my phone service put on that phone and for $10. per month added the GPS feaature.

The GPS on my phone was to be activated today, but today is the third
day that I've owned my 650. More anxious to ride than to know where I
am.

So many things to learn with a new computer, cell phone, and Burgman,
I think I'll go for a ride.

Bob
 

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Bob,

Welcome to the forum and enjoy that new 650!

Give us a report on the capabilities of that GPS phone once you get it sorted out! Heck, my phone doesn't take pictures, or surf the web, or play music, or anything - just makes phone calls. I think it has a couple of silly games that I never play... Two years old and it's a dinosaur!
 

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I have had some experience with the 'newer' GPS phones. I normally use a Motorola iDen I730 but have used the i305 and a couple of other models in the iDen line.
Nextel would be the American service provider and Telus would be the Canadian one. In my case, being Canadian, my provider is Telus.
First, there are two types of these phones. Ones that will accept programming and ones that won't. The difference is that the ones that will accept programming allow for more uses.
The requirements of E911 in the US and Motorola producing a complete GPS chip that measures 7mm by 7mm seem to have fueled the adding of GPS to cell phones.
The GPS that is in cell phones, at least the ones that I have tried, are what is called AGPS or assisted GPS. This is a network system that tells the phones GPS which satellites to look for because the towers 'know' where they are. This means that if the network has the information available the GPS in the phone will find its location within 5 seconds. If the network cannot provide the information then the phones GPS is like any other GPS and can take a couple of minutes to find it's location.
In addition if the network does not have the A part of the AGPS then it cannot automatically read your posistion. As to position, if you are inside the phones can only tell what your last position was, not what your position is now.
Now to the handsets! The basic version, such as the i305, will give you a Long and Lat location and a guess at how accurate that the position is, it will output it in a NMEA format that can be used by other devices but it will not automatically refresh that location, you have to do that manually.
The programmable handsets allow you to install application on the handset using Java and may come with a usable GPS application, my i730 did.
The i730 allows me to store waypoints, navigate to a waypoint, tell my my direction, speed (current and max) and distance travelled. So for example I have the channel waypoint and important place on the Ottawa River programmed in to my phone. This would allow my to navigate safely back to the harbour in the fog or dark if need be.
I have test it and found that it my not be the most perfect nav tool but it does work and it is usable, even in bright sun.
In addition it also outputs NMEA and I have connected it up to my laptop on occasion and driven around, in the car, just to see if it worked, it kept up pretty good using MapPoint.
The idea of having one device that does it all is pretty good, I take my phone when i go sailing and will have when I ride my Burgman, won't be talking on it but might use it to check out my speedo error but that will pretty much be it.
The screens are a little small for me to read without my glasses and I don't drive with my glasses so I don't see it being all that useful on the bike. In addition the i730 isn't waterproof or resistant so it would only be good on sunny days.

I hope this explains some of the types of GPS phones that are out there.
 

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Only phone I know of...

The Hitachi G1000 Pocket PC phone and an SD GPS card.
It is carried by Sprint. The phone is huge however. I am using a PDA/GPS the garmin IQUE 3600. It works very well on my scoot and I am happy with it.
 
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