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Discussion Starter #1
I know ... a newbie question ... because I'm a newbie.

I recently bought a 2012 Burgman 650 executive (only had 1200 miles). The previous owner obviously didn't drive it much, said he kept it on the tender all the time, and replaced the battery once.

After driving it a few hundred miles, with the last segment being 25 miles yesterday, when I went to start this morning there wasn't enough battery power to crank. The lights came on, "CHEC" illuminated on the LCD panel (and stayed on well after 4 seconds), but the engine wouldn't crank at all.

Of course I assume for now it's probably a bad battery (hoping it's not a charging system problem), and I've ordered a new one. In the meantime, I hooked up my tender and drove my truck to work (disappointing for sure because it was a great day to ride).

But ... in anticipation this might happen when I'm parked somewhere away from home, I'm wondering if there are any options to get it started other than a jump.
 

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Can you push-start a 650 Burgman ???
NO...the engine has to be running to
engage the drive clutch & power the
drive-train to turn the rear wheel.
Pushing will turn the drive train, but
it will not engage the clutch to turn
over the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Appreciate the responses ... I couldn't find what the CHEC light meant. I checked the kickstand, but I didn't recycle the kill switch. I'll check that out when I get home. Thanks ... both for the suggestions on the problem and for the info on push starting. I was guessing as much, but wasn't sure.
 

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As others have said, there are conditions that have to be met, to allow the starter to engage.
But since you're obviously new to this machine, I'll offer my own feeble attempt to add some depth for you.

Due to the "Twist and go" nature of the drive train on the Burgman, it is not wise to have the ability to be able to start the bike on the side-stand, since if someone (not necessarily the rider) comes along to an idling bike and blipps the throttle enough, the bike will take off.
So there is a switch at the side stand, not just to give an indication of the stand being down (as with some bikes) but as an interlock on the starting circuit.
You can start the bike on the center-stand, with the side-stand retracted.

Then, there's obviously the kill switch. Something I think we all fall foul of at least once in our biking experience. Again an interlock in the starting system to prevent the starter engaging.

Lastly, there is the brake interlock, which requires either of the brake levers to be pulled (sufficiently to turn on the brake lights, at least), before the starer receives the permissive to engage. Again, this is so that the rider doesn't give it some gas to try and start it, and suddenly find themselves off down the road as it starts and the clutch engages.

Any of these can bring up the "chec". I think that's them all, but someone else can correct me if I'm wrong.

So I'd recommend putting the bike on the center-stand, checking the kill switch, and pulling a brake lever, before trying to start, to see if this eliminates your issue.

Let us know if you still have the indication after trying this., because then you may have a problem.
 

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Also the brake light switches have been known to fail. It it doesn't start with one pulled try pulling the other.

Be aware that if a switch fails not only does the bike not start but the brake lights don't come on. It's a good idea to check your brake lights on you pre ride check. Turn the key on then pull each lever checking to see if the brake lights comes on.
 

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FWIW....on trips I bring a spare battery. I can use it to either jump start my bike or replace the installed battery, depending on what's needed.

I installed a "pig-tail" on my installed battery, with a quick-disconnect on the other end, which is accessible (the battery is not). Then I can connect to that a pair of jumper cables I had made, with a matching quick-disconnect on it. I leave those cables in the bike, so that even if I don't have my spare battery with me, I can still get a jump from a car or anyone else with an "exposed" battery. Highly recommend.

Will not help if your bike will not start for some OTHER reason, but it pretty much solves the "dead battery" problem.
 

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Appreciate the responses ... I couldn't find what the CHEC light meant. I checked the kickstand, but I didn't recycle the kill switch. I'll check that out when I get home. Thanks ... both for the suggestions on the problem and for the info on push starting. I was guessing as much, but wasn't sure.
Did you find out what the problem was?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
No I didn't, but it's all working now and I don't think I'll ever know the real problem. I put the battery on the tender to fully charge it. Bought a new battery to have as a spare. But I suspect I probably didn't quite get the kill switch engaged ... not sure. I recycled the side kickstand so I don't think that was the problem. I didn't really think to recycle the kill switch (though I did look at it).

Bottomline, I don't know what caused the problem, but I now have some troubleshooting techniques I hadn't thought of, and I know more than I did before about starting it with a dead battery. All is good!
 
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