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I am one of these:

  • Stickshift car yes; motorcycle yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Stickshift car yes; motorcycle no

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • stickshift car no; motorcycle yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • stickshift car no; motorcycle no...only scooters

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering the relationship between knowledge in manual transmission cars and motorcycle ridings. I suppose knowing how to drive a stickshift helps learn motorcycle easier.

I am making a bold assumption that everyone here knows how to ride scooters. :wink:
 

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Times have changed. When I was a teenager you were considered uncool if you drove an automatic car. My high school girlfriend could drive a stick shift very well. There weren't any automatic motorcycles of course. Even the scooters (mostly Vespas & Lambrettas) had manual transmissions. Of course I can shift! :p
 

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Not so long ago, many of us believed that only our cousins in the US of A persevered with fuel-guzzling automatics :shock:

As technology has moved on, autos have become more efficient and popular. As a consequence, now, two of our three family cars are autos .... and (of course) my AN650 is too.

:wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So far, no one admits that s/he can't shift. Don't know if that is a reflection of the age of this group. :wink: My daughter ended up having to teach her boyfriend drive stickshift. :shock:

I must admit that although I know how to shift, I did not know how to drive sportscars well. My friends always sneered at me when they saw me behind the wheels of the wrx and drove like an old lady. Those cars that rev'd really high at the stop lights were dismayed when i did not even make an effort to catch up. :walk:

It was the ninja 500 that gave me courage to rev the wrx up to...4000rmp, and my friends almost died laughing.

Finally, a student of mine (he has a 350Z -- the kind of student you want to fail!) took me in his car and put the pedal to the metal, and that was quite a lesson.

On the Burgman? Switch to Power Mode and twist all the way! Wheeew! :sign12:
 

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:roll: I bought my first scoot in the 1980's. I have never rode a regular shift motorcycle. However i've been thinking of buying so can of cheap ride where i could learn. I think everbody needs to learn. And by looking at this poll i guess everybody has learned except yours truly :roll: I learned on a standard car. I wouldn't think it would be such a big deal to learn how to shift a cycle. But try going out and telling someone you don't know how to shift a standard bike. And they won't let you near their ride. :D I don't think people like myself are very common. ( Thank God. ) :lol:
 

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I have a 5-speed Nissan truck, and could probably drive any kind of manual car or truck. But I started on a twist & go moped, then a twist & go 250 elite, then this twist and go 650. I'm sure I could learn to shift a motorcycle and I understand the shift pattern, but I never have.

Dave B.
 

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Both my children got their drivers liecence with stick shift. To this day they prefer it over automatics, 1- 30yr old daughter 1-27 yr old son. They both feel they have better control with it. I drive a Nissan pick up 5 speed
 

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There is a lot going on when riding a standard M/C; both feet and both hands can get busy. But a little practice (okay, a lot of practice) or taking an MSF BRC can get most people up to speed fairly painlessly.

One nice thing about M/Cs compared to manual-shift cars is that you don't use the same extremity for both clutch and brake. With right foot on brake, right hand on throttle, and left hand on clutch, stalling out on hills is less of a problem. (Driving as often as I do in hilly downtown Seattle, I won't drive a manual shift car that doesn't have either a hand brake or a hill-holder.)
 

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My dad taught me to drive in an old dump truck!

My first two old clunkers were standard shifts as were my next two brand new VW beetles.

My first two bikes were British bikes with the shifter on the right side.
(150 James new, and a 650 AJS used)

Had to learn to shift on the left side for my safety course 40 years later! :)

All my vehicles (now owned and about to be owned), :wink: are auto, but I can drive anything. (except a big rig truck)

Recently drove a new stick shift Corolla from Burlington to Kingston for a friend who was moving.
 

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Learned to drive on a stick, learned to ride (at like 11) on a little honda dirt bike.

I am quite shifty.
 

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lifegetter, this subject brings back some good memories for me, thanks.

First shifty two wheeler.........a buddy's Allstate 125.

First shifty cage............Uncle Willie's 1931 Model A (I don't believe Ford-O-Matic was available for his model) down on the farm in post rock country Kansas. Learned double clutching and shifting with clutch engaged and rolling. Neal
 

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An interesting poll but one fact remains, auto on manual, the key here is just like brushing your teeth-we all had to learn.
Being able to drive a stick does not mean you can drive a motorcycle, shifting with your hand and using the clutch with your foot is 180% degrees different. Yes you may understand why you need shift, but you can get that from a book, you still need to learn it on a bike.
Even on a scooter, knowing how to shift gives me an understanding of just how great that auto trans.is.
My first car was a Ford model T--OK. OK. it was an old one when I got it :D
Sure wish I had kept it.
 

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You guys must all be real young.<G> My first car was a 1923 Model T Ford with three pedals, one lever, hand throttle and spark to worry about. First (modern) car I drove was a Model A coupe with real clutch, shifter and foot throttle. Soon after I was driving a gravel truck with 16 speed split shifter. First motorcycle was foot clutch and hand shift (1947 Harley 74 Overhead). First motorcycle with hand clutch and foot shift was a Triumph Speed Twin (mililtary model) when I took the DR course in '55. That was the only one that was hard to learn.
 

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Try haveing a british Bike and a Japanese bike at the same time. The shifter and brake are reversed. I had a few "oop" 's
 

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Jim said:
Try haveing a british Bike and a Japanese bike at the same time. The shifter and brake are reversed. I had a few "oop" 's
I got rid of my BSA B25 for that very reason. Trying to switch between my BMW and the BSA was asking for something hurty to happen.
 

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I like driving a stick-shift car primarily because I have better control on icey roads in the winter. I don't plan to ride my Burgman on icey roads, so I'm quite content to let it do the shifting.

My car is a manual transmission Ford Explorer. I guess they're not very common. My wife & I were recently at a dinner that had valet parking. The first valet looked at the stick shift and called over somebody else to park the car. Then, when they returned the car, the valet had trouble figuring out where the parking brake is. He obviously expected a handbrake between the front seats, but the Explorer has a foot brake. Gotta keep 'em guessing. :shock:
 

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When I was in the Navy in the early seventies, I had a Suzuki TS250 and a friend had a BSA 500 Gold Star. We traded rides quite often and it never seemed like much of a problem to go from shifting on the left, to shifting on the right, or vice versa. The two bikes felt different enough, that after the initial learning period, it was a piece of cake.

I learned to drive in a '62 Chevy wagon with three-on-the-tree, and to ride on a Suzuki T120 with a one down, two up, three speed and a granny low lever on the side of the engine cases. My friends at the time had one down, three up Honda's, and an all down Kawasaki (I think). That bike was weird. Stab down from fifth to neutral to first. With all those different methods at my disposal, I've never had much trouble with shifting - or not. For that reason, when our girls started to drive, we got them a four-speed manual in a Toyota Nova beater. Neither of them ride m'cycles, yet, but they've both ridden the old Honda Aero 80 scooter.

Before we married, in fact, before I got her an engagement ring, I bought Sharon a Penton 125 Cafe Motocross (street legal), which she rode maybe once. Later, she took the MSF course (around '76 or so) after which we got her a GT185. She didn't ride it much either. Although she can ride the DR350 (stopping is something of a problem - she's 5'2"), she preferred the AN650. She'll miss it as much as I this summer. <<sigh>>

Steve

Gear up!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Brian said:
(Driving as often as I do in hilly downtown Seattle, I won't drive a manual shift car that doesn't have either a hand brake or a hill-holder.)
And that is where I first saw the admiring look on my children's face...especially coming up from Pike and I deliberated stopped at the steep part before the stop sign. [you will never make it, Dad!] I just drove up without using hand brake.

Actually, I learned to drive stick in Seattle in a 1972 Pinto.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
lilleyen said:
My first two old clunkers were standard shifts as were my next two brand new VW beetles.
Wow! Now I remember I had a 1965 beetle that was manual but without clutch! Just like Burgman 650! (about the same displacement, too? :))
 
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