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Discussion Starter #1
I've removed the butt stop from my AN400K9 and very much enjoy the added legroom, but the two holes where the butt stop used to be have been buggin the heck out of me. So I put a plan together, and here's how I fixed it:

Materials:
6" x 12" x 1/4" plywood from A.C.Moore (craft store)
Vinyl headliner and 2 densities of foam padding (obtained at a local auto custom trim shop)
DON'T NEED industrial strength velcro (was the original method of attachment - I DID NOT USE THIS, DON'T BUY IT, but it's here for the thought process)
headliner spray adhesive (auto parts store)
1/4" chisel point staples (for staple gun)
upholstery piping (from the same trim guy, a few hours later, but you should get it up front)

After getting stuck after it's done, here are the additional materials (you may figure out the problem I had):
(2) 1/4"-20 x 1" carriage bolts
(2) 1/4"-20 jam nuts (thinner than a regular hex nut)
(2) 1/4" flat washers
(2) 1/4"-20 wing nuts
-All obtained at an unnamed orange depot (or any hardware store, depot is closest to me. The jam nuts and wing nuts came in a $0.99 pack of more than 2.)

Tools (not all are 100% necessary if you have patience or alternatives):
Skil Saw (sabre or jig saw, the more adjustable, the better)
Fein Multi-Master (or any other type of sander, or wood files if you're on a budget / old school)
Electric staple gun (or pneumatic, or manual but manual will most likely kill you)
small hammer, e.g. tack hammer
1/4" drill bit & drill
very sharp utility knife blade
box / open end wrench (for the jam nuts, I forget what size, I think 7/16" or 1/2")

The initial plan was to upholster the board, and attach using industrial strength velcro, but as I worked through it, the velcro I bought seemed way too strong to tear apart, like it would rip the cover off the seat. My trim guy agreed, and also said I'd probably lose the velcro backing in the sun, so we decided a mechanical attachment was a better way to go. If you buy lower tear-away-strength velcro, this might be an option for you.

1.) First, I traced the outline of the flat panel on the seat where the butt stop goes into. The area is a bit bigger than 6" x 12", but you don't want it exactly the same size (I didn't care anyway), and transferred it to the plywood.
2.) Cut the plywood with the Skilsaw, I had my guide angled at 30°, to somewhat follow the line of the seat; then sand it to profile (MultiMaster, or other sanding tool). Finish by sanding the top edge to the same profile, and I also sanded the bottom edge to match the driver's seat.


***Here's where the pics are a little out of sequence, I covered the thing first, but was skeptical about the velcro, and consulted my custom trim guy, at which time we went to the carriage bolts

3.) I eyeballed it, but if you're really particular, measure out and drill two 1/4" holes through the plywood, then position the plywood where you want it on the seat, leaving room for the upholstery, and drill through your seat. Then put the carriage bolts in the wood, and tighten down pretty good with the jam nuts. Check the fit to ensure they go through the holes in your seat.


4.) Apply headliner adhesive to the "front" of the plywood, and the high density foam, make sure you get the edges, and leave a decent margin on the foam. Let it tack up for the amount of time prescribed on the can.


5.) Press the foam to the plywood, then trim the excess, laying it around the rounded edges you made with the sander, and cutting it "flush" to the back of the plywood.


6.) Repeat with the lower density headliner backing foam. The foam I used had one side that had a "liner" - this is the side you glue. The other side was the open cell foam, don't glue this side.


7.) Now you're ready to start the upholstery process. Don't apply adhesive, just staple, stretch, and staple. If you've never done it, it does take a bit of skill, but you'll catch on pretty quickly. Do a web search for tips. I started at the "middle" of the top and bottom, then went to the difficult bottom corners, and then the easier top corners, and finally filled in the easy parts. At the bottom corners, you'll have to "pie cut" and stretch the vinyl a bit; this is where having a very sharp utility knife / box cutter blade is necessary. The headliner material has a good amount of give to it, so you can get it pretty smooth. The last thing you want is big bulges on the "nice" side, and even on the "ugly" side, bulges are a pain. This is where you'll be happy you have a power staple gun. The craft plywood is made from semi hardwood, so I needed the tack hammer to "finish" setting some of the staples.

(this was my crappier first time, before I figured out I needed the carriage bolts)

(but the front looks good!)

8.) Now staple on the piping, starting at the middle bottom, this will be the seam. The piping will cover up the tiny gap between the upholstered pad and the seat, and will help to hide the butt stop grommets. Again you'll have to pie cut the staple strip at the corners.
(Finish upholstery the second time around after figuring out I needed the carriage bolts)


9.) Fit it up to the seat, and put the 1/4" flat washers and wing nuts on the carriage bolts.



Now you don't have to worry about the ugly grommets, and two big holes in your seat.

Or just buy a Bearcat backrest; I personally like my pillion rider "close to me", and at least in this part of my life, don't need the backrest for me.
 

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A very nice job, congratulations, and thanks for showing it off. Truly looks like factory equipment.

I'm going to fiddle around with converting my buttstop to a backrest. I bought an extra seat to play around with reupholstery, too (I really want something other than black!) In the meantime, I will probably just play around with plastic/rubber plugs of some sort. Or just put up with the holes. :) I don't notice them. (But I haven't ridden very far without the buttstop; it might be different on a long ride.)
 

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hey
can you show us how you went through the seat or did you go through the holes that are already there?

i'm trying to think of a way to do the same but go through the same holes but not use the oem butt rest bracket
i don't think i really want to drill new holes

Silly Billy :thumbup:
 

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"position the plywood where you want it on the seat, leaving room for the upholstery, and drill through your seat"

He drilled through the seat. The idea of using the existing holes should work. If you can't get to the nuts you could use wire though each hole and twist them together.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yep, drilled through the seat. I would've liked a more elegant solution, like going through the factory holes, but that would've required something more substantial. And hey, the carriage bolts work.

I'm probably going to drill out the first holes I did to a larger diameter and insert grommets that would accommodate a 1/4" bolt. That'd look a little cleaner. And possibly look at some sort of knobs for the inside, rather than wing nuts. Last, I'm thinking a strip of black, waterproof, foam rubber just inside of the piping on the back, to finish it off just a little bit better.
 

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The Majesty has four holes. My seat cover was torn so when I had it recovered the holes "disappeared". Getting rid of
the butt stop was great for my back. The pain started going away the first day.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Burgermiester said:
cheap0, if you want to go the plug route, these work pretty good.

http://burgmanusa.com/gallery/Burgermie ... eat+Plugs/
Wow, wish I would've seen that before I spent $20 and an afternoon making the cover. Actually, I still might do the grommet and plugs on the OEM butt stop holes, just to make the seat watertight. I'll pick up some grommets for the carriage bolts when I'm getting those.
 

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a shot of 'foam' in a can works great too. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The big point of this mod was to cover up the holes, but not permanently - if my fiancee ever decides she wants to drive it, she'll need the butt stop.

I wanted to keep the factory holes available, just in case, but not see them.
 

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Yea, that's a great job you did - looks OEM! Can't ask much more than THAT! :thumbup:
 

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Very nice piece of work on this mod. :thumbup:

Flint
 

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I did something similar; but just removed the over-sized butt pad from its support plate and then paded and upholstered the plate--still adjustable should someone ever care to do it:

 

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I did something similar; but just removed the over-sized butt pad from its support plate and then paded and upholstered the plate--still adjustable should someone ever care to do it:

That is exactly what I was thinking. Just cover the metal piece.

Any pics of the back side? What did you attach the vinyl to on the back since you can't staple it?
 

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High heat resistant contact cement (spray-on headliner cement). The backside has a piece of vinyl leatherette cut to size and hemmed at the edges--also glued on...
 
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