Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
:?: Has anyone had experience with both the Burgman and Honda's Silverwing? I am looking to purchase my first scooter and want to buy the best value for the money. Any insight would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Hi! I actually had the same question (look under the Burgman 650 forum). There's some great input from various riders, especially the ones that have ridden both. I think you'll find it informative.

Good luck!

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks migz123 for the link. Good info there. We have a new suzuki dealership opening in town, so I may be able to get a grand opening special! :lol:

Good Luck, Wambo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
ksmall1998 said:
Thanks migz123 for the link. Good info there. We have a new suzuki dealership opening in town, so I may be able to get a grand opening special! :lol:

Good Luck, Wambo
Great -- scout around on the forum here too, particularly on the 650 specific (since that's what you are looking to get). Tons of info there, many to help you in your purchasing negotiation too - good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Burgman Vs SW

I chose the Burgman for a number of reasons. One, the SW is in VERY short supply. Two, the 650 has a bigger motor and slightly taller profile. Three, I like the flexibility of the transmission. Four, I caught a demo and it was really inexpensive compared to the wing. Five, it just looked cool!! If you really want the wing, a Lexington dealer has a trade in red '01, two thousand or so miles, Givi top box, five grand. Hit me at [email protected] if you need details.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
It's the Burgman for me

I took part of the day to check both the Silerwing and Burgman first hand. As far as styling and sheer looks...the Burgman wins hand down. Web pics and company literature do not compare to seeing them in person. Trunk space is bigger and I prefer the LCD display. Looks like a purchase is pending :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
To 1998.....good move....you'll enjoy the 650.....nice style...great storage....and put on the Givi 52 TopBox....trust me, for the extra money, it's worth it!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Burgie beats S'Wing!

There is nothing wrong with the Honda Silver Wing 600. Like the Suzuki Burgman AN650, it is an amazing touring class motorscooter and one people are happy to own and delighted to ride. However, there are differences between the two scoots and for me, like many, it makes the Burgman the clear choice.

Here is an extensive list of the difference that were important to me. It may not be 100% complete, but it is fairly compressive.

The Silver Wing does have a slightly lower seat height, about half an inch. It also weighs about 50 pounds less and you can even get antilock brakes on the S’Wing for an extra $500.

The Burgman AN650 has more power, in part because of its bigger engine and in part because the automatic transmission has a power mode or even can be shifted manually. This gives it an edge in top speed and pick-up. The normal transmission mode is actually more economical than the Silver Wing’s one mode transmission, giving it about a 5 to 7 mpg edge. This increase fuel economy allows the Burgman to actually have a slightly better cruising range than the Silver Wing, even though the S’Wing’s fuel tank can hold two tenths of a gallon more.

The Burgman carries its weight low by putting the engine in the central hump and the fuel tank under the seat. The advantage here is handling with the lower center of gravity both at low speeds and highway speeds in curves. It also gives the Burgman the unique feature for a maxiscooter of having the fuel filler door up high to the right side of the machine, much like a car. I find this is easier to deal with at the pump most of the time. Of course, if you use saddlebags it requires a bit more finesse, but nothing I have found too difficult.

The wheels on the Burgman are a bit bigger and the tires are steel-belted radials. This translates into amazingly good handling at speed. The tires also seem to wear better and last longer. Of course, they cost more to replace, so I’m not sure if that is a big difference between the two.

Add to all the pluses so far one of the biggest when it comes to touring on these machines. The Burgman can carry more. I don’t have the number in front of me, but the Burgie can carry around 80 pounds or so more. While both machines have room for two full-face helmets in the lockable under seat storage, the Burgman is a little bigger. The front dash storage is also larger on the Suzuki and shaped so they are more useable.

There are also a host of little differences, like a power outlet in the larger front lockable storage area of the 650, not to be found on the U.S. version of the Silver Wing. The large mirrors of the Burgman are mounted on the flaring and can be folded in for storage. This gives it amazingly great rearward visibility, while the S’Wing uses smaller handlebar mounted mirrors. The headlights are superior on the Burgman, both low and high beam. The tail lights are much, much better on the Suzuki compared to the Honda. Many S’Wing owners I know felt they had to add extra brake lights for safety. The seats are a bit larger and more comfortable on the Burgie, especially the co-rider’s seat which I heard is only okay on the Silver Wing. The S’Wing’s co-rider has fold-out pegs to put their feet on. The Burgman gives them small foot boards instead, allowing the co-rider to change their foot position and reduce fatigue. The riders backrest is adjustable without tools, need tools to adjust the S'Wing's. The under seat storage light has an on and off switch, the Honda's does not.

Want to add electrical extras? The Burgman’s electrical system puts out significantly more amps than the Silver Wing. That’s a big difference if you start putting on parade lights or plugging in heated suits.

Oh, and did I mention the Burgman has dual disc brakes up front, compared to the Silver Wing’s single disc front brake? Don’t know if it actually stops better, but it makes sense to have it since the bike weighs more and can carry a bigger load. The Burgman also has even a more aggressive engine braking ability, plus you can manually downshift if you want. Save lots of wear and tear on those brake shoes.


There are probably other things I’m forgetting to mention, so feel free to ask questions and I’ll add more if I think of it.

Bottom line while they are both great machines that are fun to ride and very practical too, after test riding both last year, the hands-down winner by me was the Burgman, so, I bought one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
That's an awesome comparison minnmax!

This feedback information is just what I was looking for when deciding between the Swing and the Burg. I'm sure it will be very Helpfull to perspective new buyers.
I agree the burgman offer better comfort and leg room. I'm 5-10 260 lbs and like the additional leg room. Another difference which attracted me to the 650 Burgman, is the Final gear drive, as opposed to a belt on the Swing.
With the burgman seat design I can easily remove the backrest so I can use the stock backrest for my wife or a custom backrest for myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
793 Posts
Robvano,

Both 650 and 400 Burgmans have belt drive.

The final drive gears transfer final drive power to
the hypoid at the rear wheel.

Are you pointing out that the S'wing has direct belt-to-wheel coupling?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
I'm actually an AN650 owning Honda man - I own four Honda's at the moment and was hell bent on making it five with a SilverWing. What stopped me doing that?

1. I already own a NSS250 Forza/Jazz/Reflex ABS - I don't want to use the Burgman around town. A 250 scooter wil piss on the AN650 round town. The SW has a similar ability.
2. I wanted to use the machine for touring in tandem - the stronghold of the AN650
3. Character is important to me in a motorcycle (my other Hondas are the brutal x11, and the RVF400 + 750 endurance racers). Whether others agree with my taste means nothing to me. 270kgs all in, and a auto clutch that takes some getting used to when filtering - that's what I call character... :wink:
4. I like the idea of having selectable transmission modes - PowerMode is especially usefull for controlling the machine on the downhill run of a mountain pass.
5. Carrying camping gear without using a top box is important to me, so both the shape and volume of the underseat trunk is crucial.

For these reasons, the AN650 won hands down - despite being 2000 USD more expensive, and despite is not having ABS or CBS which I actually suits a touring bike very well.

If you want the most stylish and comfortable way to get around town then it must be the SilverWing ABS. If you are planing to go touring, it's the AN650. They are built to fulfill different goals. I wouldn't even consider the similarly priced low tech European singles when the SW and AN650 are using smoother twins.

Suzuki also build the stylish and easy-to-ride-in-traffic AN400 - this is really it's direct competitor for the SW, Atlantic and X9, not the AN650.

The AN650 is in a class of one - much like the GoldWing, and the VMax was until the X4 came along. Despite the lack of the Honda wings on the tailpeice, I'm extremely satisfied with my purchase. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
793 Posts
lycheed, you sure have mastered the english language.
Are you british?

And how would a 250 piss the 650 away in city traffic? Better milage?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
Hi Ajwood,

Yes, I'm British and living in Tokyo.
How would the 250/400 piss on the 650 round town? Where does one start...

1. Low seat - means you are not going to drop it if you need to emergency brake to avoid a wayward jay-walker/taxi
2. Low kerb weight - 160/170kg vs 270kg. Makes for a an easy to manouver motorcycle
3. Slimmer profile
4. Standard mirrors - pass over car mirrors, as opposed to into as the excellent lit AN650s tend to.
5. Conventional CVT - combined with the low seat/low weight/mirrors/slimmer, the smoothly engaging/coaster transmission allows you to filter through the sides and fronts of cars very easily at walking pace.
6. Combined brake system - means that you can stop the machine with one hand (left hand) if needed, useful for avoiding taxis, and provides secure braking without thought for the many stop and start situtations city riding presents you with.

That's the riding experience. Running costs such as brakes, engine maintanence, etc. will of course be far lower, too.

The AN250/400 is great bike. Although you rarely need more than the 250's 25bhp and 120km/h around town, the more torquey 35bhp AN400 has to be the best all round feet first machine on the market, if running costs are taken into account, with the SW coming in second. Be proud of your steed.

The ONLY feet first touring machine is the AN650 - it puts R1150RTs in the shade for rider/passenger comfort and carry space if top boxes are used, and is comparable performance-wise. It is a serious 'new order' tourer.

I prefer to ride a different bike at weekends to weekdays, so the NSS250 Forza (Refelx) on weekdays and AN650 / x11 at the weekend is the best set up for me.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top