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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I currently own a volusia 800 and have had my eye on the Burgman for some time. I like riding my bike but it seems like a chore to get everything ready to ride, . I like the idea of being able to twist and go...

Can anyone provide some insights on the advantages / disadvatages of riding a large scooter such as the Burgman over a traditional motorcycle.... Many thanks!
 

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welcome to the group. I too own a volusia and will be switching to a burg in the spring.

here's a link to a thread where I asked a similar question.
http://burgmanusa.com/forums/viewtopic. ... ht=volusia

I am going to be getting one just because for one, it's automatic, step through mounting and hopefully the riding position will help with my back trouble.

there are several people on here that have gone from a VOL to a Burg. I hope to be one of those soon.

Good luck and again, WELCOME
 

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GMJ04 said:
Hi all. I currently own a volusia 800 and have had my eye on the Burgman for some time. I like riding my bike but it seems like a chore to get everything ready to ride, . I like the idea of being able to twist and go...

Can anyone provide some insights on the advantages / disadvatages of riding a large scooter such as the Burgman over a traditional motorcycle.... Many thanks!
Off the top of my head, the Advantages of a maxiscooter over traditional motorcycle:
- Automatic transmission (twist'n'go)
- Tons of storage space (in comparison)
- Easier on tight curves (smaller wheels)
- Quiet (although this could be a disadvantage too)
- Less aggravating in rush-hour traffic
- Easier to mount/dismount

And the Disadvantages of a maxiscooter over traditional motorcycle:
- Can't take hand off throttle for a rest without losing power
- Can't put in "neutral" to coast along (not even downhill)
- Smaller wheels are a disadvantage with large pot holes
- Putting side stand down shuts off the engine (Burgman's)
 

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chuck807 said:
And the Disadvantages of a maxiscooter over traditional motorcycle:
- Can't take hand off throttle for a rest without losing power
- Can't put in "neutral" to coast along (not even downhill)
- Smaller wheels are a disadvantage with large pot holes
- Putting side stand down shuts off the engine (Burgman's)
A. Get a throttle lock
B. The 400 is pretty much free wheeling unlike the 650
C. I've hit some big ones, including a half bale of hay, with no bad effect.
D. Really easy to disconnect.
 

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chuck807 said:
And the Disadvantages of a maxiscooter over traditional motorcycle:
- Can't take hand off throttle for a rest without losing power
- Can't put in "neutral" to coast along (not even downhill)
- Smaller wheels are a disadvantage with large pot holes
- Putting side stand down shuts off the engine (Burgman's)
ted clement said:
A. Get a throttle lock
B. The 400 is pretty much free wheeling unlike the 650
C. I've hit some big ones, including a half bale of hay, with no bad effect.
D. Really easy to disconnect.
A. A stock scooter is not going to have a throttle lock. My comparison is
based on stock scooter vs stock motorcycle - no extra purchases.
B. Can't say, I have a 650.
C. But what about a large pot hole?
D. How? I'd like to do that myself!! In fact, I thought I read elsewhere on this forum that someone deactivated the side stand switch and made the parking brake function the way the side stand did as far as being able to turn the ignition on/off.
 

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GMJ04 said:
Can anyone provide some insights on the advantages / disadvatages of riding a large scooter such as the Burgman over a traditional motorcycle.... Many thanks!
I own a 2003 1000cc Suzuki V-Strom motorcycle and a 2003 Burgman 650.

- I ride the Burgman more often. I have 13,000 miles on the Burgman compared to 7,500 miles on the V-Strom (and I bought the V-Strom six months earlier). The V-Strom is an excellent motorcycle, but overall, I prefer riding the scooter.

- The V-Strom is equipped with factory hard sidecases, but the underseat storage in the Burgman is far more convenient.

- The Burgman does not handle sharp road irregularities (frost heave, railroad tracks, pot holes, etc.) as well as the V-Strom. It's just physics. A 15" wheel will not swallow a bump as well as a 19" wheel. Switching to Pirelli tires helped a lot though. For some reason they dampen sharp bumps much better than the stock Bridgestones.

- The Burgman 650's ECVT automatic works better than you can possibly imagine. I found Power mode to be quite useful on tight curvy roads, but most of the time I just leave it in Auto mode. I'm quite experienced at shifting motorcycles, but eliminating that exercise lets me focus on other aspects of the ride more.

- This time of year, with temperatures dropping, the V-Strom stays in the garage. Don't really need my legs hanging out in the breeze when it is cold outside.

- The Burgman attracts much more attention when I stop for gas or a break or to run an errand. Both people who ride motorcycles, and folks who don't, love to look it over and ask questions.

- I get slightly better gas mileage with the Burgman (about 5 mpg). It is a heavy machine (it out weighs the V-Strom by about 70 lbs), so it does not get the mileage that the 500cc and smaller scooters get. But I can expect high forties from the Burgman compared to low forties with the V-Strom.

I use the Burgman for everything that I'd use the cycle for. Errand running, touring, 175 mile weekend joy rides, etc.. It is a versatile machine. It would be fine as my only ride.
 

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GMJ04 said:
I like riding my bike but it seems like a chore to get everything ready to ride, . I like the idea of being able to twist and go...
Your statement pretty much covers how I felt earlier this year. After over 30 years of riding bikes, like you, sometimes it was just a pain in the butt to get the bike out for a ride. I loved to ride but it was just easier to take the car rather than haul the 800 lb. bike out. And, the idea of not shifting was really appealing.
So, in May, I bought a 650 after a test ride. I LOVE it. I've put over 3,000 miles on the Burgman and have enjoyed every mile. Even my wife has mentioned that I ride this bike more than any of my last couple of bikes (my last bike - '00 Honda Shadow 1100 Tourer - had 5,000 miles in 3 years).
Today, I took a ride with a buddy to my dealer in Litiz, PA. He had 2 used late-model BMWs that I really liked. I sat on both but, for the first time, I thought " nice, but who needs all of this to have fun". In prior years I'm sure I'd have bought 1 of those BMWs. I guess my Burgman has spoiled me. Chuck807 pretty much hit it on the head.
Don
 

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Paul pretty much summed it up. This year Bandit 2,250 miles and Burgman 3,750. The Bandit is winterized and put away for next year. The Burgmani is ready for any E Ohio good riding days. I like them both but the Burgman is the best overall.
 

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I use my B 650 for daily business as well as "the ride." Here are the primary reasons I chose the Burgman over a motorcycle:

1) Auto transmission. I visit numerous cities in three counties, with a lot of residential driving (i.e., u-turns) and occasional traffic. Constant shifting in traffic becomes a chore.
2) Good acceleration coupled with #1 above.
3) Storage. All my business goodies plus the jacket and alternate colder weather gloves can fit in the trunk. Plus the helmet locked inside. Priceless.
4) Styling. It's a good looking bike yet not something that you see all the time on the roads. Don't want to be one of the lemmings. :)
5) For "the ride". On my way home, I usually plot the route through the backroad twisties so I can enjoy the ride. This usually means roads through canyons and mountains with as many twisties as time will permit (I have to get home, right? :wink: ). The 650 handles the hairpins and sweepers with aplomb, without the constant shifting when doing multiple hairpins. Leaves more faculties available for sneaking peeks at the views.
6) Gas mileage. Although this is always a talking point, the previous reasons ultimately more important than the amount that will be saved each week.
 

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Twist and go

After owning sport and touring bikes over the years and living in the winter belt of Iowa I have to admit that these bikes got the cover the first hit of winter. Not the Burgmans though. It is so easy to roll it out and twist the throttle and go. I got the Givi windshield and with the fairing and leg protection and fuel injection you cant beat it. Seemed like everytime I tryed to fire up my WING in cold weather the battery would say no way! :( I bought my 650 Burgman September 09th and just turned over 2,250miles. Some bikes it would take me a season to ride that much. Can't get enough of these scoots. I don't really see myself going back to motorcycles unless I win the Lottery then look out! :lol:


Helix
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Informative replies, thanks. All my pals ride big bikes e.g 1800 cc and crotch rockets, I can keep up on my Volusia when I really get on it. Do you think the Burgman will be able to keep up in normal types of riding?. I dont want to race or anything but also dont want to feel underpowered and want some respect from them. P.s. any changes for the 05 model?
 

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Several people use the Burgman 400 for group rides. The 650 should be more than adaquate. On the turns, you'll be dogging the sportbikes. :D

The Suzuki media site lists the following changes to the 2005 Burgman 650:

* Center section of front cowl changed from black color to body color for improved appearance
* Turn signal lens changed to white color for improved appearance
* New transmission Over-Drive feature for better fuel economy at highway speeds
* Fuel consumption indicator, temperature indicator and Over-Drive indicator added to the instrument panel

There has been some dicussion on the forums if the overdrive will really exist the 05's.
 

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GMJ04 said:
Do you think the Burgman will be able to keep up in normal types of riding?.
You should be able to hang with your buddies as well or better than on the Volusia 800.

You ask about “some insights on the advantages/disadvantages“ between a scooter and a motorcycle. After putting over 10k miles on mine since June, there is only one thing about the general configuration of the scooter that I do not like; you can’t press against the tank with your outside knee when leaning through curves. This makes me feel disconnected, less “one with the machine.”

I'm not going list all the advantages of a scooter.
 

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I go on lots of group rides and my 650 keeps up to the sportbikes better than any of the cruisers. I can leave all the cruisers sitting at the lights.
 

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GMJ04 said:
Informative replies, thanks. All my pals ride big bikes e.g 1800 cc and crotch rockets, I can keep up on my Volusia when I really get on it. Do you think the Burgman will be able to keep up in normal types of riding?. I dont want to race or anything but also dont want to feel underpowered and want some respect from them. P.s. any changes for the 05 model?
Absolutely - and better than the Volusia if the road gets curvy! I ride with guys on motorcycles frequently. If they were to ride crazy enough so that I couldn't keep up with the Burgman - I wouldn't care to ride that way on my V-Strom either (and the V-Strom will easily stomp a Volusia).

Funny thing. When they come over to ride, I sometimes roll out the V-Strom, and sometimes the Burgman. I've never ever gotten a negative comment when I choose the Burgman.

The '05 model is rumored to have overdrive - possibly minor cosmetic changes. We won't know for sure until they hit the dealerships - I don't trust the information on Suzuki USA website - they have been inaccurate before.
 

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After 35 + years (on & off) riding large bikes, the scooter puts the FUN back in riding .
I really don't think I will ever go back to my big bike.
 

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Hi GMJ04,

Welcome to the forum! :)

I like riding my bike but it seems like a chore to get everything ready to ride, . I like the idea of being able to twist and go...
You owe it to yourself to take both Burgman's out for a test drive and see why so many of our forum members, who used to ride around on bigger (& far more expensive) motorcycles, are now riding Burgmans.

Riding a Burgman is more than the cold facts of "advantage & disadvantages" - it's the experience of freedom! :)

It will put a big grin on your face :D ...and that's a good thing!
 

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Randy, I'm with you re' not wanting a big bike again...but then at my age that might be expected. However, since getting the 400 in April I've put 6K miles on it whereas I had only 4500 on the 2001 Reflex I traded for it.
Also donated my '75 Guzzi to a charity a few weeks ago...hadn't touched it since getting the Burg. The Guzzi is worth more in tax deductions than I could sell it for.
 

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I haven't raced Suzuki's 800cc cruiser, but in a straight line the 650burger will absolutely stomp the Honda 750 Shadow. No contest. On a curvy road, the Honda rider has even less of a chance staying with you. When I ride with most cruiser riders, I find I tend to ride with a lot less 'enthusiasm' :wink: .

Steve
 
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