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Discussion Starter #1
My Burgman broke down a few months ago, sometime during Nov. 2007, while coming off the highway. The F1 light (turned out to be C51 code) came on and the Burgman wouldn’t shift out of ‘first gear’; from a stopped position, the RPM would only continue to rise to redline. I took the Burgman to the dealership, they told me a sensor went bad, near the CVT; it was replaced and I was back on the road several weeks later.

That morning, before the F1 light came on, I was at the gas station and before I left, I occasionally heard a strange sound, like a metallic grinding sound/ metallic squeal sound, coming from the rear-end of the scooter at idle speed. Since I never heard that sound before, it appears it was the precursor to the above sensor failing.

After getting the Burgman out of service I felt it wasn’t riding like it used to. Sure, it was accelerating and stopping like before, but the sound and feel of the Burgman was different. The feedback from the bike had changed; but I didn’t bother taking the Burgman back to the dealership; I thought it would be near impossible to explain something so abstract to the service department. Plus I really missed riding her to work everyday; the last time she was in the shop for over a month; Suzuki had to ship the part twice; the first part shipped was the wrong part.

At this point, Feb. 08 the Burgman is out of the shop and I’m riding her daily.

Weeks later another problem occasionally popped up, but I ignored it; not wanting to take my Burgman back to the repair shop. Occasionally, when the engine was cold and the Burgman was started, the rear end would shake like a Mac diesel truck. I literally thought the back end would break-off; however, a slight twist of the throttle would cure the vibrations; the vibrations also subsided as the engine warmed up.

A couple of weeks ago I was at the same gas station, heading to work, and I heard the same metallic grinding sound/ metallic squeal sound coming from the rear wheel. If I had to guess, it sounded like something was slipping in the transmission/CVT. Wouldn’t you know, on my way to work, riding on the left of a 3-lane freeway, going about 70-mph, I heard a LOUD POP, following by the F1 light coming on and an immediate loss of power. Luckily, at around 45-mph, riding on the left shoulder, the traffic cleared and I was able to swing over to a wide right-shoulder on an overpass. This time the bike wouldn’t start. Called a tow truck and she was headed back to the dealership. It just so happened that I left my cell phone home; it took forever to find a payphone; also, a collect call I made cost me over $20 - unbelievable!!!

The dealer just called me and said he did a once over on the bike, checked electrical, etc and couldn’t find a problem; then he said the engine had seized and he needs $395 deposit to start the break-down.

No, I didn’t buy the extended warranty; my warranty ended on 4/20/07. I didn’t think I actually needed it. I believe if you follow the maintenance schedule, it’s very unlikely that you're going to run into major problems; I thought the odds were on my side for at least 3-5 years. (My last scooter, a Honda Elite 50 was very reliable and I rode her everywhere in college). Oh well, that theory was blown out of the water. My Burgman has about 31K and I still owe about $5700, so I’m stuck with her.

At this time, the Burgman is at the same dealership and I just don’t believe they’ll be able to properly diagnose and fix the problem (also I wasn’t happy with the attention to detail of the work performed: the seat gas shock was bent, can’t really blame the dealership because the tow truck company also had possession of the Burgman, and the center stand switch is dangling from underneath the bike).

I want to transfer my bike to Barney’s of Brandon, Tampa, FL. I called them to see if they had experience with the Burgman; they said yes, not that I expected a different answer. I suppose all the dealers I call will state they have experience fixing the Burgman. A Suzuki representative suggested to take the bike back to the same dealership for repairs; he also said all authorized Suzuki repair shops should be able to fix a Suzuki.

Questions?

The service manager said the engine has seized, but if the engine seized at 70-mph, wouldn’t the back tire also seized, causing a skid?


If I’m going to spend several hundred of dollars to have a dealer troubleshoot the problem and then spend several more hundred dollars on possible parts and labor, can I instead spend that money on tools and troubleshooting equipment to diagnose the problem myself? If so, will the mechanically inclined members of burgmanusa.com help me with the diagnostic evaluation of the Burgman and help me get the Burgman back to operational state?

Will the service manual help me troubleshoot the Burgman? Bike doesn’t start … check A, check B, check C … etc?

Will the cost of specialized tools to break-down the Burgman engine/CVT outweigh the cost of labor at the dealership? I’m already looking at $395 deposit for the dealer to start tearing down the Burgman.

What type of motorcycle lift should I get? http://www.shop.com/+-a-motorcycle+lift-nover-st.shtml OMEGA Lift Equipment 49154 or TD Industrial 10377 Motorcycle Lift, 800 lbs or ???

Please tell me what you think? Thanks in advance for your comments.
 

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I would be inclined to avoid that group of motorcycle mechanic trainees you last took it to. If you're mechanically inclined I would at least tear it down to confirm the seized engine assumption.
 

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How mechanically capable are you? If the engine is truly siezed, then it needs to be torn down, the cylinders bored out to fit new oversize pistons, and that's just the beginning.
You have to wonder if the engine siezed, what made it do that? You'd want to correct that problem too. Usually engines sieze when they are oil starved, but there may be many underlying causes of why.
Depending on the damage, it may be better to just replace the engine with a salvaged one.
And this is just one of many possible scenarios on how this could play out.

I'd leave this one to a mechanic. It will be expensive for this work, but it could be equally expensive for you to get into a DIY nightmare you're not qualified to handle.

To answer one of the questions you asked, the engine can sieze without putting the scooter into a skid. The engine could have seized after it was shut down. Even if it happened while you were tooling along at freeway speed, the engine would suddenly quit, but the CVT would still spin or even dis engage. Even if a bike engine(or car for that matter) with a manual transmission siezed, the transmission would not freeze up, the bike would just coast to a stop.

If the bike won't crank over the engine is possibly siezed, assuming the starter system (starter, relay, ingition, battery) is functional.

Put a socket wrench on the Crankshaft bolt and turn the engine manually. It's easier to do after you remove the spark plugs. If the wrench won't turn, especially with no spark plugs in the head, the engine is most probably siezed.
 

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Hello burgman2020,

If you are mechanically inclined and have the time and space and already had the tools then I would say go for it. But if you don't have the tools, that is a lot of money to spend on tools. But then again you would have them for the next time you need them. What is you time worth is the main question. If you don't feel the delaership is good then shop around, they at least have the tools and knowhow to dig into it and get it done fast. Just my two cents worth.

Mike
 

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The real question is ... how confident are you doing the work? Good with tools? And have a reasonable good set of tools now? Can analyze information to diagnoise the problem? And get the shop manual before you begin. If you feel good about it, go for it. The other side is taking it to the dealer in pieces if it doesn't work out.

The lifts you reference work well with bare frame motorcycles. The Burg has plastic on the bottom and sides that must be removed to gain access to the machine. I have Harbor Freight item #91764 lift that will hoist the scooter 31" while it is on the centerstand. Much easier to remove the plastic when it's at eye level. The first few times I worked on my machine I had to lay on the garage floor, which is exactly why that lift is in the garage now.

http://www.harborfreight.com

Whatever you decide, good luck!
 

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I would get a second opinion from another Suzuki Mechanic. It sounds like it wasn't fixed right the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I opted to pay the dealer $395 to start the teardown. The service guy tells me the engine is seized; I believe otherwise, I think it's the CVT. When I asked what would happen to my money if they spent their time tearing down the engine only to find out, it's not the engine, it's the CVT ... the service man interrupted me and said it's the engine. Oh well, we shall see. I'll keep everyone updated. The teardown was suppose to begin May 1, 2008.
 

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I would let him tear it down, and if and when he's wrong hang him out to dry. :D
 

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burgman2020 said:
When I asked what would happen to my money if they spent their time tearing down the engine only to find out, it's not the engine, it's the CVT ... the service man interrupted me and said it's the engine. Oh well, we shall see. I'll keep everyone updated. The teardown was suppose to begin May 1, 2008.
That's easy to answer, he will tell you it was the engine and charge you anyway.
 

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And then you hang him out to dry when the scooter still doesn't work right. :x
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I got a call from the dealer today. Guess what, the engine didn't seize. He said the CVT is bad. He's going to replace all the internals of the CVT - total cost $1658. I already paid the dealer $395, so I'll have to come out $1295. That's a $1658 bill. The dealer said the engine is fine ... good compression.

I will never again buy a motorcycle without the extended warranty!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
fuzzyquilter said:
Why are you paying for something that they supposedly fixed the first time? If they replaced the CVT and it went out again, I would think it is a dealership problem, not yours.
The first time the F1 light came on, the dealer said some pulley, some part associated with the CVT (I don't know the exact part) went bad and that part was replaced under warranty (even though my warranty had already expired).

This time the dealer said the engine seized; however once they removed the CVT, the engine rotated fine. The dealer said the CVT is bad and they are going to replace the parts within the CVT.

I already paid the dealer $395 in order to start the teardown. Total repair bill is $1658, minus the $395 I've already paid. I'll probably stop by this week to see what parts will be replaced.

I don't know what's worse, the repair bill or listening to my wife complain about the $1200 bill. Let's hope she doesn't remember the $395 I've already gave them.

Since the dealer said the engine compression is good and the CVT is going to be replaced, I might just spend a few more dollars getting new plastic parts I scratched up and sell her. Can anyone give me an approximate value of the Burgman: 2006 AN650 with 30k miles?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just got back from the dealer today to inspect broken parts. The CVT belt snapped. I told the dealer I thought the CVT belt was a lifetime part; he said lifespan is 90,000-miles.

One broken CVT belt = $1695 repair bill. Go figure. :evil:
 

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Man! Sorry to hear of your dilema. Glad it's fixed. Save the receipts! The motorcycle lifts are the way to go if you can swing it...neighbor has one and it makes things so much easier.

Not that it was ever a doubt with me, but extended warranty's are worth the peace of mind alone imho. Onidea Suzuki in Seattle is selling them at a substantial discount over Suzuki Corp. for same coverage. I have a month to purchase mine...waiting for stimulus check or will just fork over the cash. Either way, this thread cemented the decision.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well the dealer just called me; he said my Burgman is ready; that's assuming I got $1283.26. If you ride like me, like I just robbed a bank, I cannot stress the importance of getting the extended warranty!!!

It's almost been 2-months ... my body feels deprived of riding, it seems like it's been a very, very long time. I don't see how people up North can go without riding for months during the winter.

I just hope the mechanic put my scooter back togther correctly.

Hopefully the weather is nice and I can find someone at work to drop me off in the morning/afternoon to pick her up.
 

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You can save a lot of money, if it's say an engine... by taking the engine out and taking it to the service dept. to do the major work, then pick it up and install the engine back on. You see it a lot on older motorcycles and recreational vehicles at a service dept. Although, some service depts won't work on bikes that are older... say 15 yrs plus.
 

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burgman2020 said:
Well the dealer just called me; he said my Burgman is ready; that's assuming I got $1283.26. If you ride like me, like I just robbed a bank, I cannot stress the importance of getting the extended warranty!!!

It's almost been 2-months ... my body feels deprived of riding, it seems like it's been a very, very long time. I don't see how people up North can go without riding for months during the winter
I just hope the mechanic put my scooter back togther correctly.

Hopefully the weather is nice and I can find someone at work to drop me off in the morning/afternoon to pick her up.
- I am missing something here, the belt broke which is still covered under warranty, then Suzuki should be paying for the repair should they not, as it is the culprit that caused the damage to begin with. I would be on the line with Suzuki corporate service department directly and geting them to pick it up or at least a good part of it,

- If you check around locally there are real good independant small shops that repair all brands of bikes, once out of warranty this is a real good alternative . I am lucky here as I have found one who works on the major brands and this guy is real partial to Suzuki's and loves to work on them, he has several Burgman customers also, so he is starting to know these bikes real well. He is charging $48.00 an hour instead of dealer $85.00 to $90.00, gives everyone a good discount on parts, tires etc., he works on the bikes himself with one employee sometimes two, but he only has room for a maximum of 25 bikes, some are in there for a tire, some for brakes, some for cables, some for engine rebuild, some for tranny work etc., and this shop is normally fast to get the bikes out, none of this 5 mechanics talking for a 1/2 hour together at the parts department counter while waiing for a .22 cent washer and you are paying big bucks for this wasted time.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
burgman2020 said:
Hopefully the weather is nice and I can find someone at work to drop me off in the morning/afternoon to pick her up.
Well I picked up my Burgman late Friday morning and rode home that evening. The ride was pleasant; it felt good to ride again. Since I was restricted to 4000-rpm, I managed to keep the mpg above 50. The next day I rode the Burgman without earplugs and noticed a high-pitched squealing sound during acceleration; the sound disappeared during idle and coasting. I was planning on asking some members who live close by to take a ride a test ride on my Burgman and report any strange sounds and/or behaviors; however, I didn't get a chance as I broke down on the highway again this past Sunday. What made matters worst was I was running away from a thunderstorm, that promptly caught up with me when the Burgman broke down.

I was riding on the highway at 4000-rpm about 68-69mph. I experienced a brief loss of power. A few minutes later sounds similar to an electric blender were coming from the transmission/CVT. As I was slowing down and pulling over the sounds got worst until I coasted to a stop. The engine turns over fine; however, no power gets to the rear wheel.

The first-time the CVT belt broke I lost power immediately; this time I lost power gradually, I was not about to be stranded on the highway, with no cell phone, while a thunderstorm was quickly approaching me from the rear; hence, instead of pulling over immediately, I reduced my speed to about 40-mph and rode on the shoulder.

Anyways, I left the Burgman overnight on the off ramp and had it towed back to the dealership the next morning.

Ironically, the Sunday message at church that morning was JOY!!! We should all be joyful Christians, no matter what the circumstances :D
 
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