Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Would does the handle head and cross wind?

Do you find the you have to counter stear for the cross winds or because of it low center of gravity and body wind is no problem?

I own a KLR650 and it being so tall, it is like a sail in the wind!!!

Thanks for all replies...

dbocz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,686 Posts
Wind has an effect on anyone on two wheels. I find that on scooters, with their low center of gravity, that the battle is easily won with a little of leaning into the wind. Of course the quickest way to lean is with countersteering.

I've never been on a conventional motorcycle, so I can't compare. Riding scooters for 20+ years I have never thought the crosswinds were too much to handle, except on loose gravel roads.

Dave B.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
David Hough that writes Safety articles for Motorcycle Consumer News wrote a very good article entitled "Got Wind' about 6 years ago. Was very informative about how wind affects various styles of motorcycles. Even to rider attire, such as loose sleeves of a jacket flaping in the wind will contribute to handling in the wind.

If I can find the article in my files, I'll scan and post it. Copies I guess can be obtained by going to mcnews.com for back articles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
The 650 handles crosswinds better than most of the motorcycles I have had. Proper riding technique and proper suspension setup are important, just as with motorcycles. Tires should be at maximum recommended pressure and the rear shock should be at a fairly stiff setting. I deal with 30 mph and higher crosswinds frequently riding in Nebraska and Iowa. When I had my V-Strom, I always took the scooter on windier days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
While I'm very new at riding on two wheels, I have found that my initial response to crosswinds (hanging on way too tight) resulted in a very unpleasant ride. Now that I've been riding a few months with some even windier days, I find that if I maintain a good grip but not a death grip and lean contrary to the direction the bike is being pushed at about the same amount, then it is not scary, doesn't drift too far in the lane and isn't nearly so hard to handle.

I hope I'm doing something right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
A good number of Mr. Hough's articles have been compiled in 3 VERY Good books which I would suggest be MANDATORY reading...

"Proficient Motorcycling"
"More Proficient Motorcycle"
"Street Strategies"

I've seen them at Borders and Barnes and Nobles and they are also available from Riders Wearhouse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I also ride a KLR and can appreciate your feelings on it in the wind. One of the problems with the KLR is the high mounted fender which creates a high pressure on a very long arm, if you recall your basic physics, this isn't a good thing. I relieved the high pressure by augering seven one and a half inch holes in the sides and top of the fender. This helped stabilize the bike even in 30-40 mph side winds in KS this summer.

Now the scoot--I ride a 400 and the handling is stable. There will be slight buffeting but nothing close to what you experience on the KLR. Keep a loose grip and it does very well.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top