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I have heard of people complaining of Burgmans that are hard to push backwards when running. It may be your transmission dragging. I have a 2009 Burgman 650 with 15,000 miles on it. If it is hard to push or if the motor seems labored when you turn higher RPM's then check the transmission oil level. You can remove the level test bolt without removing any plastic body parts. I checked mine recently and got 30 oz of extra oil above the 12 oz normal fill level. Oil can migrate from the motor at higher speeds and overfill the transmission. The motor now accelerates faster, revs easier, runs with less strain (sounds quieter at speed) and pushes easier. My gas mileage also went up as a result. I was told to check this by a gentleman that has several Burgmans and has had the same problem so I assume it is fairly common. When the transmission overfills with oil the extra drag from the oil creates resistance that puts more strain on the motor and makes the bike harder to push and slower to accelerate. I also noticed that when I let up on the throttle the scooter slowed so fast I hardly ever had to use my brakes except to come to a full stop. All these things are the result of the drag the extra oil puts on the drive train. The scooter now runs better than ever. I will be checking my transmission oil level at every oil change from now on.
 

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My 09 with 17,000 does the same thing. At every oil change my trans is over full & engine oil level is down. Shifting into manual mode will also help to make it easy to push around. If you do this right before you shut it down it will also push easier when the engine is off too. ;)
 

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You know, I've been wondering if the multitude of gears and bearings (and oil) in the 650's drive train contribute to its not-so-great fuel economy.
 

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bbgunner,

is that 3.0 oz. or 30 oz. (bad eyesight on my part, maybe), Also when you open the level test bolt, does the extra oil seep out and down the platic cover? Do you reccomend a pan under the general area? What a great tip, thanks.

GunnerJ
2012 650 Exec - Darksided 6/13
 

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I can testify that both tips work:
Switching to manual before switching the engine off makes it noticeably easier to push the scoot around, and bleeding off the excess oil from the transmission raises the top speed/makes the scoot more lively at higher speeds.
 

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Interesting.

However, would it not migrate right back in the transmission?

I never really worried about it in the 73800 miles before my breakdown (Jsut changed oil every 4K to 5K Miles).
 

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The oil migration is a slow process, which maybe correlates to engine speed, i.e. goes faster if the engine generally sees more revs.
 

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My guess is the majority of the drag is in the clutch. If not, why did Suzuki reduce the clutch drag twice. If I remember correctly, they did in the 04 or 05 models and in the 13 model.
 

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I know it does Migrate.

An experience that nearly cost me an engine explaisn how I know (my mess up).

First time I changed oil in the transmission, I thought the little bolt in center of the case (associalted with the bearing and tube to the bearing) was the oil fill hole and removed it. Then, I realized it was not and put it back in. Apparently forgot to tighten it.

I ended up filling thru the level hole. No problem there. The problem was when I put that bolt back in, I finger tightened it and forgot to tighten it.

During a ride the bolt came out and I was blowing oil like crazy (the guy behind me said, but he could not catch up to let me know).

FORTUNATELY, we were stopping for a breakfast. When we did, I found out about the oil. Felt up under thh machine to see where it was oming from and the bolt fell out on the gorund. It had someohow fell and stuck to the plastic ledge. AMAZING.

Anyway, I went to refill the tranmission and realized it was full, but the engine oil glass was empty. I added nearly three quats to the engine.

That close to burning it up and I had only about 1000 miles on the bike since I bought it used with 1700 miles on it.
 

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How, exactly, does engine oil "migrate" into the transmission?? :confused:
Engine oil also flow through the clutch housing. There is a shaft that passes from the clutch housing to the transmission housing. Oil leaks past the seal on that shaft from the clutch housing into the transmission housing.
 

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Had a little migration during my 1000-some miles from WA to CA last weekend. The engine oil level is now down to "max" and the reduction gear case is at "full" again after draining out 4 or 5 tablespoons of oil. It's an irritation but not a huge problem, just something to watch on long trips at highway speed.
 

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For some reason I thought the oil migration issue was resolved on 2005 and newer 650's. I'll do a search and see if I can find it.
 

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Had a little migration during my 1000-some miles from WA to CA last weekend. The engine oil level is now down to "max" and the reduction gear case is at "full" again after draining out 4 or 5 tablespoons of oil. It's an irritation but not a huge problem, just something to watch on long trips at highway speed.
Therein lies the problem? I was told by my dealer NEVER fill above the Max mark. Best to keep it just a little lower. So far, no problem.
 

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My theory is that high revs cause more oil migration, since the migration is much less after I modded mine to reduce revs.

Are there any filters or traps to clean in the crankcase ventilation system? Maybe there's somehow a build-up of crankcase pressure at higher revs pushing the oil to the reduction gear housing.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
There is a seal on the motor where the crank shaft goes into the transmission. The oil pushes past the seal into the transmission side (migrates). Higher engine speed creates more pressure in the motor to push the oil past the seal. I'm sure if you just check it when you change your oil it should be fine. I will have to check and see if there is a pressure relief valve for the motor like on a car. It would make sense to have one. Maybe it is plugged and not letting the pressure out. That would cause the oil to push out into the transmission. Gunner asked if it was 3 oz or 30 oz extra oil and it was 30 oz that I got out plus the 12 oz needed to get to the overflow point. Needless to say WAY more than was required. I will check the parts manual to see if I can find a relief valve and see if it is plugged and let you know.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
As Jim has shown in the above post the oil gets pushed past the seals. I checked and there is no PCV valve on the Burgman to stick or go bad. It just uses a vent tube that goes to the air filter box so any over pressure or oil mist gets sucked back into the intake and burns it up in the motor. As a result there should not be a build up of pressure from the motor. Any migration of oil is from seal and shaft interface. Maybe the design allows for a little flex in the system and that might allow some oil to work it's way past? For what ever reason the oil that moves to the transmission is little enough that checking it when you change the oil should be good enough. If anyone needs to check on the breakdown of any of the parts assemblies for the Burgman (or any other model or type) check out the BikeBandit.com site. You can enter the manufacturer, model, year etc and under OEM parts it lists the different assemblies on the scooter and the breakdown of parts with part numbers. You can even order the parts from them.
 

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Therein lies the problem? I was told by my dealer NEVER fill above the Max mark. Best to keep it just a little lower. So far, no problem.
Thanks for the info. When I get home from this 2500-miler I'll change the engine and reduction-gear oils and make sure that the engine is below the max mark. I probably won't be doing hours and hours of 4000RPM riding again for a while, so not expecting to see migration.
 
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