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After I put 600 miles on my new Burgman650, I'm going to tour the coast of California anda back down through the mountains. What experiences have you had touring the BUrg 650? Did you have any trouble? What were the good points....what should I watch for?
 

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Last summer I rode from the Canadian Border to the Mexican Border via I-5 over three days, hung around San Diego and Anaheim for a few days, then rode back to Seattle via the PCH. The 650 does great on the freeways, but is equally adept in the twisties and mountain passes.

I didn't have any trouble, with the exception of almost running out of gas once on the southbound leg when I missed a planned fuel stop in Bakersfield (I never did see the city...or even any signs).

I'm going to do the same trip next week, except I'm going to do the southbound leg in 36 hours (maybe even shoot for 24) as an IBA Challenge.

The huge trunk allowed me to carry 10 day's worth a clothes, toilettries, etc. secured out of sight (which led to some interesting looks when people saw my Washington plates and no visible luggage).

I stayed in motels the whole time and rode on major highways, so I packed fairly light. I was able to carry all of the folowing:

Under the seat I had:

5 shirts
3 slacks
10 undershorts
10 pair socks
1 blue blazer
2 ties
2 pair dress shoes
shaving/hygiene kit
cold weather jacket
2-piece rain suit

1 qt oil
1 liter water
small can Honda spray cleaner/polish
assorted small towels and rags
Service manual

In the glove boxes I had:

Legal documents
Owner's manual
Compact camera
extra film
sun glasses
sun block

The primary down-side for me is the 4-gallon fuel tank. I can go 170 - 180 miles per tank, and if I keep my speeds down around 60 can manage 200 miles (finishing on vapors -- do at your own risk). While I'm usually ready to get off and stretch by then anyway, a few more miles to handle emergencies would be nice.

Also, the smallish tires mean rough roads can be a bit uncomfortable. Nothing I can't handle, but people with back trouble should be prepared and take extra precautions.

Have fun with your new scoot. You're going to love touring with it, I'm sure.
 

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I've done considerable touring in rather desolate areas on my AN650. The main concern is fuel range when gas stations are few and far between. The best thing to do is to top off the tank whenever you stop (even if you are only down a gallon or two). Other than that, I've had no issues.
 

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There's no problem other than the range on a tank of gas. You'll find roads that say "next service 100 miles" after you just filled up 30 miles ago! That said, put the bike on the center stand during fillups - it'll get you a tad more fuel. Don't use power mode unless you absolutely have to in the twisties, otherwise it'll burn more fuel. You might consider carrying some spare gasoline with you. Other than that - no problem. I've done a 640-mile day on the California coast thru the mountains with no problem. I've done a 450-mile day on California inlands with no problems. This is one reliable bike!
 

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Touring

Most all touring comes down to preparedness.

Try taking an over-nighter before doing an across the country ride.

The over-nighters will reveal problems with seats and your equipment list.

After a practice run, my wife and I threw out 1/2 the stuff we thought we needed and bought other items.

Little things like sun screen and chap stick will save you a lot of pain.

I would recommend a "tire plugger" and a "smart" air pump for your tire repairs.

The Burgman rides a little stiff for those all day trips. You should probably get a kidney belt to protect the lower back.

You will need clothing to protect yourself from the heat of the deserts and the cold of the mountain passes.

Have Fun. Don't push it too hard.
 
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