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Tara, a Minn-Max member, completed an Iron Butt Association (IBA) Bun-Burner Gold ride on her Suzuki Burgman 650 this past month, by successfully covering 1,500 miles in 24 hours. Two years ago, Tara and her husband Ian together completed an IBA Saddlesore 1000, which is a thousand miles in 24 hours. Tara was on her Burgman, while Ian rode his Honda Silver Wing for that ride.

I think they're both nuts, but congratulations to Tara just the same.

Link: Iron Butt Association
 

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That is really impressive. I'd enjoy knowing some of the details: the route, time on the road, down time, personal impressions.
 

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Incredible. That's 62.5MPH average for the entire 24 hours. Every pit and food stop raises the necessary road speed to maintain that overall average.

The Iron Butt part I can understand. But, how do you maintain concentration for that long at those speeds? I don't think i'd want to share the highway with any of the participants.

Ken (teamCONCENTRATEONTHEFREAKINGROAD)
 

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I'm sure they had auxillary gas tanks, CB's, GPS, and radar detecters. I'd love to see pictures of their bikes.

Pit stops are short and far between, bathroom breaks are available as the gas pump is flowing, and you eat/drink while riding.
 

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I didn't have an auxillary tank on my Minnesota 1000 ride. It would have been nice, but not necessary. GPS, Yes!

Cheers,

Bob
 

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:D That is an incredible amount of miles. I have, when younger, done multiple 600-750 mile days, so I at least have an idea of what it would be like. Your whole body starts to get a numb, kind of tingling, feel to it. When you get off the bike the noise and wind feel like they are still with you. When you close your eyes to go to sleep, the road and traffic start rushing at you again as you jerk back awake. I heard about the Iron Butt Rally's inaugaral run (Was it like 8-1000 mile days or something?) back then. I didn't have a bike that I felt would hold up to the miles, but I wanted to try it really bad. The Burgman would have been the perfect bike for it.

I salute you on your accomplishment!
 

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Xray said:
That is an incredible amount of miles. I have, when younger, done multiple 600-750 mile days, so I at least have an idea of what it would be like.
Another key point to bear in mind: the tough part on these rides, generally, is not the miles. The tough part is that in addition to the miles, there are strict recordkeeping requirements. You have to collect receipts at every stop. You need to check those receipts to ensure they have meaningful timestamps. You have to log your odometer mileage at every stop and list your location.

1500 in 24 hours is particularly tough. I've set out on two attempts to do it. Both attempts became standard Bun Bunburners, which is 1500 in 36 hours. The first attempt, after 1900 miles in about 32 hours, there was a lot of confusion at the final gas stop, and in all the excitement, I forgot about my receipt. Result: attempt over. On the second attempt, my GPS steered me off Interstate and onto surface streets through parts of the LA area at around the 1800 mile mark. I found a deputy sheriff off the highway at a speed trap. I pulled over at around 2100 miles and 33 hours to have him sign as a witness, and the log form got away from me and blew over a barbed wire fence into a field... the deputy jumped the fence and went and grabbed it for me!

Paperwork wasn't as much of a problem for me on my SaddleSore 1000 ride... the snow and ice was...

Greg
 

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Another key point to bear in mind: the tough part on these rides, generally, is not the miles. The tough part is that in addition to the miles, there are strict recordkeeping requirements. You have to collect receipts at every stop. You need to check those receipts to ensure they have meaningful timestamps. You have to log your odometer mileage at every stop and list your location.
You got that part right. I threw away 1500 points for omitting to write in the time I left a bonus location!

Cheers,

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm sorry I cannot provide lots more specifics on this particular ride. Tara hasn't posted a more detailed accounting of the trek and she is off already with Ian on a trip to Massachusetts and other points east of Minnesota. (These folks ride A LOT!)

I do know that there were no auxiliary fuel tank involved nor a radar detector. Tara's Burgman does have a CB and it is likely that she borrowed Ian's GPS for the 1500 mile jaunt.
 

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As far as I remember, the rules for the Iron Butt "do it on your own" events stipulate that you must have witnesses at the start and finish, plus a fuel log noting the odometer reading, date, place and time of each gas stop, verified by gas receipts.

Cheers,

Bob
 

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All I can say is Minnesotan's are tough. (My Grandma useto say tough headed.) It starts with leaving the tip of your tonge on something steel outside in January when you're growing up because you don't believe your parents. With that rite of passage completed, some of us look for further personal punishment.


:salute: minnmax, pass on the salute to Tara when you hear from her next. Like the commercial says, sport is where you find it, and she is a champion.
 

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1500 Mile Ironbutt

That's an outstanding accomplishment. On 50th birthday, I rode 1,066
miles from Illinois to Texas on my Honda Shadow 1100. I left at
12:01 A.M., and arrived at my brother's in Texas at around 7:00 P.M.
How long did the 1500 miles take?? It had to be close to 24 hours.
 

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I'm glad to hear that the attempt was a success!

Next month I'm doing my own IBA challenge, a Border-to-Border run.

My original plan was to do it in 36 hours, which would allow me to stay within the DOT hours of service guidelines (not required, but I wanted to try it). I was going to include one 1000-mile leg in 24 hours as a "nested" challenge.

But after reading this, I may try the whole thing in 24 hours, and at least add some miles to bring mine up to 1,500 miles (from the Blaine, Washington to the San Diego, California border crossings is about 1,410 miles if I recall).

Yeah, the record-keeping requirements are tough, but fair. Using automated gas pumps and taking photographs can be a big help.
 
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