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First and foremost, this is a great group with what seems to be some great people. OK, enough brown nosing. :) I am new to the group, but have been lurking for about 6 or 7 months. I have not riden in about 30 years, but have always had the urge to get back on two wheels, besides my bicycle. When I saw the Honda Silverwing I thought that was it, a dream come true, then I saw a used Honda Pacific Coast 800 and thought it might be OK too even if I would have to shift. Then the Burgman 650 caught my eye. Now I have the bug... :D OK, onto my questions.

I would be riding for pleasure only on weekends, at least for the next 7 years. I would be riding two up with my wife for a total of 325 pounds. How well does the 650 do in the mountains? I live at 3500 feet and would be traveling from the 2000 foot level to about 10,000 feet. I guess what I am asking is would the 650 make a good sports/touring scooter in the mountains?

Also what should I look for in a Suzuki dealer? Price is important, but what else should I be looking at?

Thanks,
Alan
 

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The last couple of days I took day trips to the mountains around Albuquerque. It had power to spare. I had it in overdrive most of the time, which gave me mpg of over 50. This is a great touring bike.

Welcome to the board.
 

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Welcome Elmo,
Although I've not yet ridden above 3500 ft. or so, I wouldn't hesitate to do so. The 650 is an excellent choice for comfortable two-up riding in virtually any situation. One great thing about the Burgman, is that loading (of passengers) seems to have very little effect on gas mileage.

Welcome to ICOBO!

Steve
 

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Elmo Lucy said:
Also what should I look for in a Suzuki dealer? Price is important, but what else should I be looking at?

Thanks,
Alan
1st Welcome Alan,

RE what else to look for:

Do you plan on doing you own maintance (oil changes, etc.)?
If not, their Service Dept. would be very important

As for power, no problem, but I'm a "Flat Lander" relitively speaking (1,000 ft MSL). I hear of trips in the mountains with little to no altitude affects.
 

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Alan, Welcome to BurgmanUSA. The Burgman 650 is probably the ultimate choice in a sport touring scooter - at least of the models currently sold in the USA. It not only has the power, but it has the handling and brake power needed for mountain riding, particularly if some of it will be 2-up. I do recommend that you get totally comfortable with riding it yourself before carrying a passenger.

You'll want to talk to the service manager at the dealership to see if they have experience at working on the Burgman 650. Try to get a glance at the maintenance area as well to see if it looks neat, clean and organized. The dealer I go to has one technician who does all the scooter service - he is always the one who works on my 650. I believe he has received special training on them. He is an older technician, not a rookie, and he will answer any questions that I have when the service work has been completed.
 

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Welcome to the BurgmanUSA forums Alan. Glad to have you join us.

Since been away from motorcycles for a few years, I'd suggest going back and taking the MSF course before hitting the road again. It served as a great reminder of some of the riding habits I had lost driving a cage.
 

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Welcome aboard Alan.

I currently have an AN400 and waiting for the delivery of my 650 executive. British Columbia is the land of mountains so I know where you are coming from. If your going to tour and ride two up in mountainous areas get the 650 as you will find the AN400 will slow down on those 7% uphill grades particularly with two up. The other problem with the AN 400 when you are riding two up is that you have limited passing ability when you want to pass someone going up hill in a passing lane. The AN400 is a great scoot but it does have its limitations particularly in mountain driving conditions with two up. The 650 would be ideal for your needs.
 

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I cant offer you and advice on mountainous riding as I have none in my parts. However I can offer you a welcome to the forum. Greetings :wave:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks to all for the big welcome. Also want to thank you all for the input. The 650 it will be. I guess the first thing I should do is take the MSF course, then start looking my scoot.

Thanks Again,
Alan
 

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Alan, I think that the 650 is the best choice for you given where you live and the riding you will be doing. The MSF course is a must. There are 2 very good books I recommend that will assist you, “The Complete Idiot’s Guide To Motorcycles” (3rd. edition) and “Total Control” (Lee Parks author) Total Control at first glance appears to be written for sports bike riders however the book covers some very basic information to assist you in those rides on your 650. These are some of the things covered in Total Control, traction, steering, fear, concentration, vision, line selection, throttle control, riding two-up etc. The book is well written and has good visuals.
 

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Hi, Alan. :hello2:

Forgive the late reply, but I missed your first post.

I have ridden my 650 from the Canadian Border to the Mexican Border down I-5, and thus through the Siskyous, etc., and back to Seattle via the Pacific Coast Highway; have ridden it from Seattle to Spokane across Stevens Pass or Snoqualamie Pass several times; been up to Hurricane Ridge in the Olympic Mountains; and up to Paradise Lodge on Mt. Rainier.

I can say without reservation that the 650 is a great bike for touring mountain highways and byways. It has power to spare, and the liquid cooling prevents "shock cooling" of the cylinders when you go from climbing to descending and back to climbing again and again.

Changing the automatic transmission from "Normal" mode to "Power" mode gives you extra control going through sweeping curves (once you get used to it), and while I use Normal mode 99% of the time now (I quit playing with the 5-speed manual after the first couple of weeks), Power mode is a true joy when its use is warranted.

As far as load capability, the Burgman 650 weighs 607 pounds when fully fueled, and has a gross weight of 999 pounds; so with a useful load of 392 pounds there is plenty of capability for you, your significant other, and a nice picnic basket...or two or three. (Truth be told, I've known more than one rider to go over the gross weight without breaking anything, but 999 is what the placard says.)

Anyway, good luck in your search, and I hope you become a Burgmanman real soon.
 
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