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Hello, new friends
They say you need to plan your retirement, today I bought a 2011 ‘650 with 32,000 kilometres (yes, I come from The big white north). I am 63, owned a couple of Kawasaki’s in my youth and promised myself I would ride again once I have more time.

I read much about the burgman, my other option was a Honda St1300, after debating, I chose the burgman because of the lower centre of gravity, better manoeuvrability in town and I would get a more recent machine on a similar budget... and I don’t need the extra 60 horses, and their gasoline thurst.
A lot of motorcycle reviewers were surprised with the big burg, for its ride comfort and surprising acceleration. So I plunged. My machine has the original windshield and I will be looking for a wider shield to protect the hands better (remember where I live), would love to hear about pros and cons of the various options in windshield, thank you in advance.

I plan to take the bike with me in camping. I have a 26 foot trailer with a ram pickup with standard bed length (2017) looking for the best way to carry the bike with me. It is too heavy for a rack behind the trailer, it would fit in the bed of the pickup, hoping to be able to close the gate if I put it diagonally. Looking for your experience and wisdom in this challenge too...
 

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Welcome Jaillet,

I too am waiting for someone to explain the best way to load a B650 in a P/U Truck.

You might think about getting a Toy Hauler Camper.

Take a look at this site for all your maintenance needs:
 

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burgmans don't like unpaved roads, they don't like their bars used as tie down points, and has been mentioned before, the windscreen doesn't like going down the road backwards,. I'm not sure how you are going to close the gate with it on a diagonal unless you have a very strangely shaped gate, and getting the lardy in and out of the pickup bed will require several refreshing beverages and probably half days ration of cusswords. Best idea I can come up with, have wifey drive truck, you ride bike behind (not good to have irate wifey behind you in a heavily laden vehicle with you on a ---anything) but then,, if you are taking her,,, camping in a good quality inn with climate control and restaurant will lighten that trailer a bit. You are 63, too young to die of campicide by swmbo.
If you are not married, burgmans are great chick magnets, you should be able to get a "temp" pretty easy. (getting rid of them is the hard part.)
 

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Welcome @Jaillet , I see you've met mikey.

I was 63 when I bought my current Burgman 650. I did have an earlier model from 2006-2009 so I knew what I was getting... and that was a big part of the decision to go back to that bike.
I retired less than a year after that so you could say I was planning for my retirement ride. I go camping with mine... but I tent camp and ride solo so I pack everything I need on the Burgman. Keeps things simple. So far I've "resisted" all the attention @mikeyMarine refers to. Just no good explanation to tell my wife for bringing home that extra passenger. I wanna live a little longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
burgmans don't like unpaved roads, they don't like their bars used as tie down points, and has been mentioned before, the windscreen doesn't like going down the road backwards,. I'm not sure how you are going to close the gate with it on a diagonal unless you have a very strangely shaped gate, and getting the lardy in and out of the pickup bed will require several refreshing beverages and probably half days ration of cusswords. Best idea I can come up with, have wifey drive truck, you ride bike behind (not good to have irate wifey behind you in a heavily laden vehicle with you on a ---anything) but then,, if you are taking her,,, camping in a good quality inn with climate control and restaurant will lighten that trailer a bit. You are 63, too young to die of campicide by swmbo.
If you are not married, burgmans are great chick magnets, you should be able to get a "temp" pretty easy. (getting rid of them is the hard part.)
Thanks Mikey, great advice that I will not share with my wife...:)
 

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Hello, new friends
They say you need to plan your retirement, today I bought a 2011 ‘650 with 32,000 kilometres (yes, I come from The big white north). I am 63, owned a couple of Kawasaki’s in my youth and promised myself I would ride again once I have more time.
I plan to take the bike with me in camping. I have a 26 foot trailer with a ram pickup with standard bed length (2017) looking for the best way to carry the bike with me. It is too heavy for a rack behind the trailer, it would fit in the bed of the pickup, hoping to be able to close the gate if I put it diagonally. Looking for your experience and wisdom in this challenge too...
@Jaillet
Welcome sir. You have made an excellent choice for the new activity. I think most of the points you were asking were responded to so I won't fill the page those things. Get out and ride the new to you scoot and tell us what you think about it. Riding and camping fit together nicely. You have some great areas up there in the frozen north to do both. :)
 

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@Blacktruck Thank you for the welcome. I ordered a Givi windshield yesterday, looking forward to get it. I am also spinning my brains on how to carry the bike and trailer. In Quebec my home state, law allows you to build a train of 19 meters (62 Ft) on the road as long as it is stable and all towed wheels have brakes. So thechnically I could tow a bike trailer behind the camping trailer. As long as I don't have to back up, I should be ok... Have you seen this in the States?
 

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Just my opinion but I would not do the train you mentioned. I am a long term commercial driver and having something like that is more of a pain than doing it the right way. Figure a way to put it in the truck and you will be much happier. Yes I have seen this in the states and it doesn't work well. It does work but you are limited in what you can do and where you can go. I also have the Givi windshield and highly recommend it. Much better than the stock windshield but it is more flexible in a high wind situation.
 

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Hello, new friends
They say you need to plan your retirement, today I bought a 2011 ‘650 with 32,000 kilometres (yes, I come from The big white north). I am 63, owned a couple of Kawasaki’s in my youth and promised myself I would ride again once I have more time.

I read much about the burgman, my other option was a Honda St1300, after debating, I chose the burgman because of the lower centre of gravity, better manoeuvrability in town and I would get a more recent machine on a similar budget... and I don’t need the extra 60 horses, and their gasoline thurst.
A lot of motorcycle reviewers were surprised with the big burg, for its ride comfort and surprising acceleration. So I plunged. My machine has the original windshield and I will be looking for a wider shield to protect the hands better (remember where I live), would love to hear about pros and cons of the various options in windshield, thank you in advance.

I plan to take the bike with me in camping. I have a 26 foot trailer with a ram pickup with standard bed length (2017) looking for the best way to carry the bike with me. It is too heavy for a rack behind the trailer, it would fit in the bed of the pickup, hoping to be able to close the gate if I put it diagonally. Looking for your experience and wisdom in this challenge too...
 

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I have been thinking about this same conundrum for some time. I have a pop-up camper and a small Ironton trailer for my Burgman 650, either of which I tow with my Toyota Tacoma. The problem is in taking both forms of recreation with me simultaneously.
I have eliminated the idea of putting my 650 in the bed of the Tacoma because it's such a heavy and unwieldy piece of hardware, although I have carried smaller and lighter bikes in there many times over long distances. (BTW, I never closed the tailgate; a smart and redundant tie-down strategy always worked well.)
I have considered dumping the pop-up and getting a slide-in camper unit so I can pull the Ironton trailer, or possibly buying one of those toy-hauler camper trailers, which are becoming very popular with the ATV crowd. That might possibly be the simplest and most convenient answer.
 
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Hi Jillet
  1. HI Jillet. Welcome from one Newbe to another. Despite being a continent apart are paths almost match. Likewise I'm 63 and winding down for retirement. I have also just purchased a 2007 650 burgman executive in readiness, only difference is I have also owned an St1300 for the past 4 years and despite loved every minute of it, however due to age related issues have decided praps its was time to downsize to a lighter bike hence the Burgie. I must say to date I haven't been proved wrong. Loving it so far and looking forward to enjoying many happy miles touring with the other half,. Only wish was I had used it when I did the route 66 back in 2017. All the best and happy retirement. Gazbo57
 

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I've known about a few riders who have pulled a Bunkhouse, Aspen, or Mini Mate pop up camper behind their Burgman 650 scoots. Saw 2 of them from Washington state at a rally many years ago in north central Iowa.
 

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I have been thinking about this same conundrum for some time. I have a pop-up camper and a small Ironton trailer for my Burgman 650, either of which I tow with my Toyota Tacoma. The problem is in taking both forms of recreation with me simultaneously.
I have eliminated the idea of putting my 650 in the bed of the Tacoma because it's such a heavy and unwieldy piece of hardware, although I have carried smaller and lighter bikes in there many times over long distances. (BTW, I never closed the tailgate; a smart and redundant tie-down strategy always worked well.)
I have considered dumping the pop-up and getting a slide-in camper unit so I can pull the Ironton trailer, or possibly buying one of those toy-hauler camper trailers, which are becoming very popular with the ATV crowd. That might possibly be the simplest and most convenient answer.
Yes I understand completely the problem created by the desire to take all of our stuff when we travel. Multiple trailers are not the answer to be sure. Yes it can be done in many places but not all. It is nearly impossible to back up and subject even more to weather conditions. I don't know what a Tacoma is rated to pull but a trailer to carry both the camper and the bike would probably be the most practical and certainly the easiest to live with. I agree on loading the bike in the truck. Again it can be done and has been a regular choice for a lot of people but that requires ramps and the ability to handle it up and down those sane ramps. I can do it now but in a few years, I would not consider the need to still do that. Please keep us posted on what you do to solve this. I am pretty sure there are others out there also looking for ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Finally got the Burg after 15 days of waiting for a rendezvous at the govt license office, blame it on the pandemic. Replaced the original shield (which was impeccable for a 2011) with a big givi, already a + on ride comfort. First feeling, I find it noisy, the transmission, and maybe a knock in the engine or is it it’s natural sound. (Any history of engine knocking after 32k km ot 20k miles?) But I also find the road noisy when passing or getting passed. So I think it’s my half-helmet (Ls2) as I was used to quieter rides on my GPZ wearing a fullface.

The good news is after careful measurements, it will fit in the pickup bed in diagonal, with the panel closed, which will allow me to pin the trailer. The bad news is the low guard. 5 inches over 5 ft wheelbase. The 6 ft ramp yields a landing angle way too high. Not only will the bike´s belly drag on the top of the ramp, but the rear wheel will be lifted and I will loose all traction. Some engineering thinking required ahead for this one.

And maybe try a fullface helmet to reduce noise.
 

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Also check for pillion, sometimes excessive road noise can be caused by not enough snickers bars in pillions posession, a few good caramels and less water can help.
 
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I'm about 15 months away from retirement and this is one option that I'm looking at to allow both camping and bringing my B-650 with me. Perhaps see if I can find a reasonably priced used trailer and then build it up from there to what I want. For me, the single-sided bunk would suffice.

 

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And maybe try a fullface helmet to reduce noise.
I feel your pain on the noise. I usually ride with a modular helmet, although riding with my fullface helmet is not that much quieter.

My best solution for the noise turned out to be a pair of Plugfones. Not only do they reduce noise dramatically, I can also listen to music/books/podcasts without having to crank them up. My first set were the cheaper, wired ones and they were fine, although I had to continually plug and unplug myself from my phone in the Ram mount. Last year I switched over the slightly more expensive Bluetooth ones and they have worked just as well without the bothersome connection.
 

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The good news is after careful measurements, it will fit in the pickup bed in diagonal, with the panel closed, which will allow me to pin the trailer. The bad news is the low guard. 5 inches over 5 ft wheelbase. The 6 ft ramp yields a landing angle way too high. Not only will the bike´s belly drag on the top of the ramp, but the rear wheel will be lifted and I will loose all traction.
I always had my best luck loading big bikes is by lowering the tailgate of the truck and then looking for a hill or incline .....back tailgate towards crest of hill from the low side. The trick is to get loading ramp as level as possible. Make sure your ramp is rated for 900lbs and let the skinniest man ride it on while you stand ready to steady it. Not having a clutch will be a whole new experience loading a bike on a ramp. Prayers of Safety go out to you ....please post pics cause I want to do it too.
 
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Not having a clutch will be a whole new experience loading a bike on a ramp. Prayers of Safety go out to you ....please post pics cause I want to do it too.
I ride my AN650 up and down a ramp to my trailer frequently, although the trailer is much lower to the ground than a truck bed. The actual riding isn't bad, though, and I'm glad not to have a clutch. I have three single ramps strapped side-to-side, hence I can put my feet down on each side. By controlling the throttle and both brakes, it's a cinch to modulate my speed up and down, including temporarily reversing direction if I'm not happy with the line I'm following.
 

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Jaillet look at the Black Widow brand of ramps. I have the 3 piece arched ones but they also make the single width. They have them in different lengths to accommodate the height of your truck bed, 4 wheel drives are higher. The arch eliminates the sharp angle.
 
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