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Discussion Starter #1
Well here it is, a complete valve adjustment tutorial with pictures.

Refer to pictures for this tutorial http://burgmanusa.com/gallery/Ranko/valveadjust/

First and foremost, budget a LOT of time for this job. Like 8+ hours if you've never done anything this complicated. It requires patience and care to avoid mistakes. Also try to do this in an area with as little airborne dust as possible. If you do not have a garage and can't bring the scooter inside, place a tarp over the scooter and yourself before opening the valve cover, to prevent any dust or dirt from entering the engine.

Step 1: Assemble the tools for the job. You will need the following:

:arrow: A box to hold any small parts taken off (preferably a clean one, so that any oiled parts do not get dirt on them)
:arrow: Half-dozen shop towels, or a roll of paper towels
:arrow: Disposable vinyl gloves (Not required, but does keep your hands clean when dealing with oily parts like the valve cover/bolts/gasket, air filter, etc)
:arrow: 5mm Allen socket (Not an allen wrench)
:arrow: 6mm Allen socket (also not a wrench, and both of these can be purchased individually if you don't want to drop the cash on a set)
:arrow: 8mm wrench (a socket will not work)
:arrow: 10mm wrench (the one in the toolkit will work fine)
:arrow: 8mm socket
:arrow: 10mm socket
:arrow: 24mm socket (I'm pretty confident you won't find this in any of the smaller, sub-1000 piece tool kits in your local hardware stores, ask for it all by itself)
:arrow: 3/8" drive ratchet
:arrow: 3/8"-1/4" drive adapter (The type that fits on the 3/8" ratchet or torque wrench, and holds a 1/4" socket, don't get the opposite)
:arrow: 3/8"-1/2" drive adapter (Yep, same as above, only 1/2" instead of 1/4")
:arrow: 3/8" drive 6" extension
:arrow: Needle nose pliers
:arrow: Hot glue gun + glue, or JB Weld
:arrow: Spark plug tool (the one from the toolkit will work, of course)
:arrow: Crescent wrench (For those stubborn CVT air filter screws, a 6" wrench should do)
:arrow: Magnetic pickup tool (Invaluable when you drop bolts, and actually required to position the rear airbox bolt if your 10mm socket is not magnetized)
:arrow: Feeler gauges (These almost always come in a large set, you will need a set that has at least a .005" and .009" gauges. If you want to be picky about your valve settings, get .003-.005", and .007-009". 45 degree angled ones make this job quite a bit easier, although straight ones will work)
:arrow: Torque wrench that measures inch pounds (Not absolutely required, but well worth the money it can save you in damage to your machine from over-torquing, a good one can be had at Sears for $80)

Optional: Beer, pretzels, and a loud stereo playing Pink Floyd, ZZ Top, Queen, Rush, Covenant, or what ever it is you listen to. The Wall is a great album to listen to whilst performing maintenance on any vehicle. :twisted:


Step 2: Put the scoot on the center stand, open the seat, and remove the 2 bolts shown in the picture titled "Engine Cover Bolts". Then remove the engine cover. It is a little tricky to get out with the seat shock there, but it does come off. Then remove the 4 nuts holding the seat to the hinge plate. Trust me when I say you do NOT want to remove the 2 swivel bolts to get the seat off. It's very difficult even with 2 people to get those back in, with the seat bolted to the hinge plate. In the picture titled "Seat bolts", the swivel bolts are indicated by the vertical arrows, and the seat nuts are indicated by the angled arrows. Then remove the pin and washer holding the shock onto the seat.

:!: BEFORE MOVING THE SEAT ensure that the connector for the trunk light is disconnected and untangled.

To remove the panel immediately in front of the seat, pop out the 2 push pins, one on either side, and pull the back up. The front sides are simply held in place by plastic tabs. Using a very small (2mm or smaller) slot screwdriver, dig into the gap in the push pin and lever the center piece out. Be gentle, they break easy.

Step 3: The picture titled "Airbox and electrical" shows 3 connectors marked with large arrows. All 3 of these must be disconnected. Not to worry, they are all different connectors, you won't mix them up upon re-assembly. The 2 small arrows on the left indicate the air filter cover screws. Remove these and put into the parts box. When you remove the top of the airbox, a sensor attached to it will hold it down because it's connected to a tiny airline that goes into the intake. Pull up gently and this line will disconnect. The 2 small arrows on the right indicate the intake boot clamp screws. Loosen, but don't remove these screws. Then remove the intake boot. Take care not to lose the clamps.

Looking at the picture title "Airbox Removal", you'll notice I've circled a portion of the frame. You'll need to take the 10mm socket, on the 6" extension, and push the trunk back while putting the socket down in there to get at the rear airbox bolt. Use the magnetic pickup tool to remove the bolt once it's loosened. Then remove the one that's more visible, then remove the gray electrical plug from the airbox, which is circled in green near the seat hinge. There is also a black line directly below the connector, remove this as well. Pull the airbox up and forward, there are 2 guide pins under the area where the filter sits, a vent line near the lower arrow, and a short pink tube near the upper arrow. The short pink tube is capped off, and will probably fall off of the airbox in short order. Take this opportunity to empty any oil that may be in this tube.

Step 4: Using a 10mm wrench, loosen the throttle cables, and disconnect them from the throttle body. See the picture titled "Throttle Cables". Now, looking at the picture titled "Intake Removal", you'll notice I've circled the intake bolts. These are 5mm Allen bolts. They may be hard to loosen, as they appear to have locktite on them. :!: THESE ARE SOFT BOLTS, make sure that you get the socket completely down into the bolts before trying to loosen them. Make sure you don't lose the o-ring when removing the intake. There is also a line that goes into a port on the valve cover. Disconnect it, and pull the intake out of the way. No need to disconnect the fuel line. 8) Cover the engine port with duct tape or masking tape, and drape a towel over the intake.

Step 5: In the aptly titled picture "Spark Plug Lead", you'll see the lead as you would from the left side of the bike. Gently twist the lead clockwise and counterclockwise while pulling slightly, and the lead will pop off. You can them remove the spark plug using the tool in the tool kit. The black line that runs across the valve cover is flexible enough, hook it behind the engine port for now.

:!: WARNING: Dropping the spark plug can cause the internal conductor to break. This will result in a non-running or poorly running scooter! Set the spark plug aside somewhere where it will not get dropped or knocked around.

Step 6: To adjust the valves the engine has to be at TDC, or Top Dead Center. To get it there, the engine will have to be rotated manually. The bolt to turn the engine is behind the CVT air filter, and the CVT air filter is behind the plastic on the left side. Reference the pictures "CVT Access" 1, 2, 3 & 4 for steps on removing the left panel to gain access to the filter. To remove the rubber mats, grab one end and pull up until it begins popping up. Then remove all of the plastic push pins and screws holding on the left side panel. Then remove the left side panel. It will pop off fairly easily, just don't twist it very much. Now, look at the picture titled "CVT air filter cover", and notice where the socket is, that and the other green bolt have to come off. These are 8mm bolts.

:!: WARNING You will be using this same socket to torque the tappet nuts in the head after doing the adjustment. Clean the inside of this socket with a Q-tip or something similar before using it in the head.

Now, look at the picture titled "Loosening filter screws", and you'll notice a very easy way to loosen those stubborn air filter bolts. You might notice that I've already broken my stock screwdriver handle into half-a-dozen pieces by using a 17mm socket. Don't do this. It doesn't work, I assure you. Instead, put the larger philips bit from the toolkit into the handle loosely, so that the grooves in the bit are above the handle. Using the crescent wrench, twist the bit while pushing as hard as possible on the screwdriver handle. Those screws are in there tight, but not that tight. They'll loosen eventually. Once the filter is off, go ahead and wash it if it doesn't look like the filter in the picture. Chances are yours will be filthy, and no better time like the present to clean it. Hand wash with dish soap and air dry. :!: Don't apply any oil.

Step 7: Place several towels under the valve cover, as there will be a little oil coming from the head. Now we're ready to take the valve cover off and inspect those valves. There is a large bolt in the center on the left side of the engine, and 2 bolts on the right side. The lower bolt on the right side is kinda hidden. Remove all 3 and set the larger bolt on a paper towel as it will be oily. Make sure the black rubber gasket comes off with the bolt. Gently wipe the oil off the gasket. Hold the valve cover in place while you remove the bolts and put them into the parts box. Then, gently pull the cover away, while making sure the gasket comes off the cover. Don't use any tools to remove the gasket, your fingernails are more than sufficient. Now set the valve cover aside upside-down. Make sure it won't fall as it will break very easily. Now, looking at the head of the engine in between the the 2 recessed bolts you removed to get the VC off. There is a big chunk of the gasket that holds it onto the head. Use your thumb and index finger, gently pull this up and away from the head. Using a towel gently dry the oil from the gasket. :!: DO NOT USE WD-40 OR ANY OIL DISPERSANT ON THE GASKET! It will eat right through the rubber. After drying the gasket, place it in the groove on the valve cover. These gaskets tend to leak if they have an oil sheen on them, as opposed to the dry gaskets used on most car oil filters.

Step 8: Now, use the 24mm socket to turn the engine bolt COUNTER-clockwise, slowly. You will see a pattern of the exhaust springs compressing-uncompressing, and shortly thereafter the intake springs will do the same, and then there will be a long area where neither move. You want to check the clearances around the middle of that area. There is a thin metal disc between the valves and the cam chain, and it has a white dot on either side of this area. See the picture titled "Cam movement", which shows the cam in position to open the exhaust valves. For reference, the valves on top are the intakes, and the valves on the bottom are exhaust.

:idea: The camshaft spins at half the speed of the crankshaft, so it will take 720 degrees of rotation on the crank to turn the camshaft 360 degrees. If you are going by the TDC mark in the rear view window, you may need to find TDC, and then spin the crankshaft another full turn. The engine also has a tendency to jump forward right at the point of TDC, so it may save a lot of aggravation to use a non-ratcheting handle, (like a breaker bar), to turn the crankshaft.

:!: WARNING Do not attempt to turn the engine clockwise. Doing so may cause the timing chain to jump a tooth, which can prevent your scoot from running! Only turn counter-clockwise!

Step 9: Look at the pictures titled "Inspecting clearances" and "Close-up of the valve clearance", and you'll see that I'm measuring the intake valves. The adjustment screw and the end of the valve look like one piece that was broken cleanly in half horizontally. Gently slide the feeler gauge into this gap, (.003-.005" for the intakes, and .007-.009 for the exhausts). If the gauge does not go, DON'T force it. This is the tricky part, though, as the feeler gauges are VERY sensitive to angle. A slight change in angle will cause a loose feeling gauge to become very tight. Take some time to feel this out. A properly adjusted valve will present a slight dragging feel to the gauge as you put it in and take it out, even when the angle is adjusted. It should not be difficult to remove, but should drag just slightly. If the adjustment is out of spec, either too loose or too tight, proceed to step 10. If ALL FOUR, (yes, there are 4 valves to adjust), are in spec, skip to step 11.

Step 10: In the picture titled "Adjusting the clearances", you'll see I have an 8mm wrench on the adjustment nut, and needle-nose pliers on the adjustment screw. Hold the adjustment screw in place while you loosen the adjustment nut. DON'T loosen the nut too much, as soon as the nut is loose the screw will become more than loose enough to adjust. Turning the screw counter-clockwise will loosen the clearance, and turning the screw clockwise will tighten the clearance. A turn of 90 degrees will take you from too tight to too loose, so make a subtle change, and then while holding the screw with the pliers, snug the nut. DON'T CRANK IT DOWN, just snug it. Re-check the tolerance and repeat as required until clearance is satisfactory. Do one valve at a time, don't try to multitask. After all 4 adjustments have been made, put the CLEAN 8mm socket on the torque wrench and set for 84 inch pounds. Holding the torque wrench ONLY on the head and handle, gently snug the nut until the handle of the torque wrench lightly snaps. The handle will be bent slightly at the connection to the head when the wrench has snapped. Torque all 4 nuts down and inspect the clearances again. If any have changed re-adjust them as needed.

Step 11: Clean any oil off the lip of the head. A little will tend to drip down from the bottom. Put the valve cover back on, using the half moon on the side of the gasket to align it to the head. Holding the valve cover in place, start all 3 bolts by hand, and once they are holding the valve cover in place, use the 6mm Allen socket in your hand to tighten the bolts down.

:!: WARNING Machine screws (such as the valve cover screws) can be cross-threaded, resulting in damage to the screws and the head. If the bolts start but then immediately get tight, then they are cross-threaded. Take the bolt back out and try again, don't try to force it.

Now, using the 6mm Allen socket on the torque wrench set for 120 inch pounds, gently apply torque to the 3 bolts in a circular pattern, you want to tighten these bolts evenly, so give one a little torque, but don't snap the wrench, then go to the next, and around in a circle about 3 times before torquing to the full 120 inch pounds.

Put the spark plug back in, being careful not to smack the tip of the plug on the wall on the plug tube. The spark plug will not feel as smooth as the valve cover bolts going in, it will be a little jerky, but it should not require any significant force going in. Take your time with this one. Replacing a Burgman head in the event of a cross-threaded spark plug is not cheap! Once it tightens, give it an extra 1/16 of a turn. NO MORE THAN THAT! Place the spark plug lead back on the plug. The plug lead makes a subtle, quick snapping when it seats fully.

Step 12: Ok, let's plug in that glue gun or get out the JB Weld for this one. The short drain hose for the airbox falls clean off the first time you pull it, and that little bitty clamp won't hold it for nothing. So we're going to secure it before putting the airbox back in. This is not absolutely required, but highly recommended. First, spray WD-40 on the port on the airbox, and in the tube, then wipe both free of oil. Place it back on the airbox using the clamp to hold it in place, and have at it with the glue. Get it all the way around so that this thing doesn't go anywhere. Trust me when I say you will knock this thing off trying to get the airbox back in if you don't glue it, and it won't stay by itself ever again.

Step 13: Move the black line you tucked behind the intake port back to it's home position over top the valve cover. Remove the duct tape covering the intake port on the engine, and put the intake back on the engine, running both screws in by hand for several threads before using a ratchet. To be on the safe side, torque these to 84 inch pounds. BE VERY CAREFUL, that you get the allen socket ALL the way into these bolts. They are soft, and the heads can be rounded out very easily. Now hook the throttle cables up. If you forget to do this you'll have to deal with the embarrassment of backing your scoot all the way down the driveway with it idling, twisting the throttle while pushing off, and then falling flat on your face when the scoot doesn't move! :roll: :lol:

The throttle cables are different lengths, and will naturally fall into their proper place when pulled towards the throttle body. Double-check, though, that the throttle twists in the proper direction after hooking the cables up. Connect the black hose from the PAIR valve on the throttle body to the port on the valve cover.


Step 14: In the upper left hand corner of the picture "Inspecting clearances", you'll notice a black hose. This has to go onto the back of the airbox. Yeah, I know. My suggestion is to cut a portion of the plastic flap that is in that area, and reaching through near the rear wheel, put this hose on AFTER the airbox is bolted in. A new clamp is also a good idea as this hose likes to come off. A good screw-type 1/4" hose clamp from the auto parts store. Pictured titled "Hose clamp" shows that type of clamp. DON'T CRANK IT DOWN! Just enough for the hose to stay put.

So much for keeping the gallery on one page, eh? :lol:

Step 15: Put the airbox back in. Be gentle easing it into it's place, it has 2 guide pins on the bottom that need to be lined up. You'll know they're lined up when the holes for the bolts are lined up and there's no gap between the airbox and the bracket for the front bolt. Put both bolts back in, using the magnetic pickup tool to put the rear bolt in. These bolts don't have to be torqued to anything specific, just hold the head of the ratchet in your fingers and give it a gentle twist when it's snug. Plug the PAIR hose into the airbox, it's underneath the gray connector, reconnect the gray connector, and put the boot back on the air box and throttle body. Don't crank down the clamps, either, just enough so that you can't pull the boot off the throttle body. It's not going much of anywhere, anyway. Put the air filter back in, (if it's dirty, go ahead and clean it first), and put the lid back on by hooking the back into the loops on the airbox directly below the frame rail. Make sure to hook the tiny hose coming out of the little square on the lid to the little nipple on the throttle body. Fish the connector on the left side up, put in the bracket for that screw, and put the screw loosely in the airbox. Take the other bracket and put the screw in that side of the airbox, and re-connect the the injector plug, MAP plug, and the 4-connector to the plug on the other side of the airbox.

Step 16: Replace the cover in front of the seat, fishing out the lead for the trunk light first, and bolt the seat back in place. Easier said than done. Reconnect the trunk light connector, and replace the engine cover. Close up and go for a ride! :D

See now I knew I would forget something.

Step 17: Put the CVT air filter back on the plastic bit, and then screw it back on, and don't get those screws so **** tight! We don't want to break another stock screwdriver handle trying to take them off next time... :roll: Then put the filter cover back on. The lip on the cover goes on top. The long screw goes in the forward hole. Don't need a lot of torque on these. Now when you go to put the side panel back on, make sure the tabs are lining up as you put it in. There are several on the footrests, and 1 down by the front wheel. You may also need to snap the lower black plastic piece on the painted part in a location or 2. Put all of the push pins back in, and put in the 3 screws. Verify that you have no extra parts in your parts box, clean up any oil that may have dripped onto the floor under the engine, then go for a ride.

If your scoot displays any unusual symptoms after re-assembly, check the basic stuff, like the tiny rubber hose from the MAP sensor to the throttle body, (this can cause high idle and backfiring under light throttle), louder than normal exhaust sound, (did you leave a PAIR valve hose unhooked?), or an oily mess around the exhaust, (especially if that breather hose that goes into the back of the airbox slips off, makes a big mess if you travel at high enough speeds to lose oil).

Checklist! (Print this part out)

:arrow: Did you adjust FOUR (4) valves?
:arrow: Did you tighten and properly torque the adjustment nuts?
:arrow: Did you triple-check your clearances after torquing the adjustment nuts?
:arrow: No debris in the head of the engine?
:arrow: Valve cover gasket seated properly in the groove on the valve cover?
:arrow: Did you properly torque the valve cover bolts?
:arrow: Did you reinstall the spark plug? Tightened to 1/16 turn?
:arrow: Did you put the plug lead back on firmly?
:arrow: Did you take care of the easily lost drain hose on the airbox? Still attached after the airbox is back in?
:arrow: Did you move the long black line back into place atop the valve cover?
:arrow: Did you remove the duct tape from the head before putting the throttle body back on?
:arrow: Did you reconnect and tighten the throttle cables?
:arrow: Did you reconnect the PAIR hose to the valve cover?
:arrow: Did you reconnect the other PAIR hose to the airbox?
:arrow: Did you reconnect the crankcase breather hose, (the one in front of the rear wheel), to the airbox?
:arrow: Did you reconnect the grey plug to the airbox?
:arrow: Did you reconnect the 3 plugs over the airbox? (Fuel injector, MAP sensor, and one going across the top of the airbox?)
:arrow: Did you reconnect the MAP sensor hose? (The very tiny hose that connects the MAP sensor to the throttle body?)
:arrow: Did you reconnect the trunk light plug? Wire routed so that it doesn't get pinched in the hinge?
 

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Congratulations for undertaken a big job that will help alot of us first timers. I did the job last week and found the service manual difficult to follow. After you figure the procedures out, then you can follow the logic in the manual.

I hate to think how much time it would have require if I had not experienced taking most of the Tupperware of the Goldwing to add accessories.

If I had any idea of how frequently the valves need to be adjusted and the amount of time required, the Burgman would still be sitting in the dealer's showroom. Now that the 600 mile service is over, I can enjoy the scooter for the next 3500 miles. By the way, the valve adjustments were all within specification.

I'm sure your instructions and pictures will help me at the next service.

Thanks,
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My intakes were ok, but my exhausts were way too tight. I believe that the harder a person rides, the faster the valves will need adjustment. So if you putt around under 40mph while being very easy on the throttle from stops, you will probably only have to adjust the valves ONCE in 50K miles. (That is just my guess)

But if you are like me and like to reduce front tire wear as much as possible... :roll: :wink: :D Then ya' might wanna check 'em often.
 

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Instructions Valve Adjustment

Thank you very much for posting these instructions. I had no book when I did mine two weeks ago. This would have been a great help. Luckily I have been wrenching for several years.

The problem wasn't how to, but where to. It took me a while to find the TDC line behind aft RH gear box plug, but finally found it. Only one intake valve was tight.

I have printed and taken notes on all your pictures. You went through allot of trouble for the rest of us. Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Re: Instructions Valve Adjustment

Goodlife said:
Thank you very much for posting these instructions. I had no book when I did mine two weeks ago. This would have been a great help. Luckily I have been wrenching for several years.

The problem wasn't how to, but where to. It took me a while to find the TDC line behind aft RH gear box plug, but finally found it. Only one intake valve was tight.

I have printed and taken notes on all your pictures. You went through allot of trouble for the rest of us. Thanks again.
I didn't even bother to find the TDC window, as is obvious from the pictures. Having to turn the engine a little, then go over and look at the window just seemed like too much work to me. And the head was open right there where I could see it... :lol:

Not a problem. I was kinda bored this week, waiting on a job here. :roll:
 

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Feeler gauges

Where did you find the offset feeler gauges? I've been to NAPA, Auto Zone, Auto Palace, Advance Auto Parts and Sears. None of them have an angled guage set that covers the sizes needed.

I could find gauges that cover the right sizes.

I could find gauges that were angled.

I couldn't find gauges that were angled, AND the right sizes.

I found a couple of sets that were angled, but the smallest gauge on the angled sets was .008, which would work fine for exhaust, I think? But what about the intake?

Anyway, could you post the exact make/model of your gauge set, and a link to an online source to buy it would be nice.

I'm over 700 miles now, will break 1000 within a week. I've got the other tools you list in the garage, but don't want to start the job until I'm sure I've got the right gauges.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I found them at Sears, and the set starts at .005, which prompted me to go ahead and use the loose end of the spec.

Non-angled ones work, but they're more work to get them into position. I suggested the angled ones for ease of use.
 

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valves

Please forgive a stupid question but.. why couldn't you just bump the starter to get to tdc? You could take out the fuse for the headlite to save battery. I know bumping is a hit or miss way but if it would work it would be nice.
If there was a way to turn the engine over that would save a lot of work.
and{ where is that tdc window exactly.}???
I am going to talk to my dealer and see if they have any shortcuts.
What a good job of explaining EVERYTHING. Good job....
Thanks, Sanford
 

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Yup yup yup - excellent write up!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Re: valves

sanman55 said:
Please forgive a stupid question but.. why couldn't you just bump the starter to get to tdc? You could take out the fuse for the headlite to save battery. I know bumping is a hit or miss way but if it would work it would be nice.
If there was a way to turn the engine over that would save a lot of work.
and{ where is that tdc window exactly.}???
I am going to talk to my dealer and see if they have any shortcuts.
What a good job of explaining EVERYTHING. Good job....
Thanks, Sanford
TDC is a plug on the right rear side of the engine, it has a large copper washer. Hard to miss, just look above the exhaust.

I prefer turning engines by hand. Sprays a lot less oil around that way.
 

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rpm

Got another question.
I went to show my 400 off to a friend. It was on the center stand and I started it up. He reved up the engine and when he got to 3000 rpm the engine ran REAL rough. It would surge . Above or below that it was even and steady, great idle. We did not over rev it or anything.
Also I noticed when I go thru the neighborhood at that rpm it does the same thing. I just have 170 miles on the scoot.
I know it doesn't shift when on the center stand so I am not sure if it is a timeing issue or just a single cylinder thing or what?
Thanks for all the knowledge out there.
Sanford.
 

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sanman,

It's generaly not a good idea to rev any engine like that, when the is no load on it. It's too easy to over rev it, and it could run too lean.
The engine will behave differently depending if there is load, or no load on it. They are tuned to have a load applied to them (real world).

Case in point,
I had a 327 Chev engine, with a 3/4 race cam in it. It idled rougher than gravel, but smoothed out under load (hammering it). Adjusting the at idle, by sound. we got it to run real smooth at idle, but it was a real dog, and had no power.

Bike engines, are high performance engines, and will behave similarly
 

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Discussion Starter #18
That may have been true of carbs, but with digital fuel injection the computer can be programmed to have your cake and eat it too. :D

The rub is no manufacturer is immune to EPA standards. :?

And the 400 runs just as bad at 3K with a load on it. Not that there's that much load on it at 3K, anyway. But anytime I try to maintain speed where the RPM is below 3.5, the engine sputters and puffs and misses. I try not to ride too much below 45 because of this. :roll: When I was tuning my Ninja it did the same thing when the midrange was lean.

Can't wait to get my hands on a PC, so I can tune out the little FI bugs.
 

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Excellent instructions, I'm no mechanic but was able to follow your directions just taking it step by step. About half way through thought I'd gotten in over my head with scooter all apart and wife giving me the look like she thought I'd need to load it on a trailer and take to dealer to get it running again. only probem was getting one of those bolts of the cooling fan filter, managed to break my screwdriver even useing wrench on end of it and striped out the phillips head, ended up getting one bolt off and rotating the cover with the stripped bolt still in. Exaust were at .007 left them alone and adjusted intake to .005 (my smallest feeler gauge) changed sparkplug while everything was apart and changed oil.
Runs great and saved some money, thanks for taking the time to post those instructions because there was no way could have done it with just the shop manual
 

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Nippleboss,

The solution to loosening the tight screw is to use an impact screwdriver. You can get a set/kit for $6 - $10. You hit the impact driver head with a hammer. At the instant of the strike, force is imparted against the screw and turns it. You can remove those super-tight screws without stripping the slots.
 
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