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Discussion Starter #1
I know from previous threads that Burgman 650 riders have done the Colorado Rockies, but wonder if there are any Burgman 400s that have? Curious to see if with one up this would be too much to handle and especially not having the advantage of the 640 to gear down.
 

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There are at least a couple of 400 riders on the board that live in Colorado and ride the mountains so I don't suspect you will not have any problems. I know from experience that the 400 handles heights up to 6,500 feet one up with no problems.
 

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I've been at 8k with absolutely no problems. One up, you should be fine.
 

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I did a 1,500 mile ride on a 08 B400 in CO without any problems. Highest ride 14,000 ft at Mt Evans.
 

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Yeah I wouldn't see any reason it wouldn't be able to handle it.
 

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We live in Grand Junction, Colorado and have been all over the state on our '09 400's, including through Rocky Mountain National Park on Trail Ridge Road, the highest continuously paved road in the United States, Pikes Peak, Red Mountain Pass, Douglas Pass, Monarch Pass, the Grand Mesa, etc. I had no complaints. They lose HP with elevation but, so does everyone else. I never felt like anyone was pushing me. Don't take the trip too early in the season, as there will still be sand/gravel leftovers from winter maintenance. If you'd like company, when you make your plans give me some notice and maybe we can arrange to get together.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone. I wasn't sure how much of a struggle I would have at those altitudes and especially steep inclines. If I was unsure about going up, there is the coming down. Riding with another on a motorcycle he can shift down as needed. I have this sick vision of me flying down the mountain like Maxwell, the Geico pig, on a zip-line. I know I sound a little timid, but my riding in Kansas isn't much in the way of preparation.
 

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Most just use the b400s rear brake to substitute for the lack of engine braking. I had to replace mine at 20k. The fronts are lasting to 40k. But I ride a lot of mountains and ride the rear brake pretty hard doing so.

I don't know Kansas riding, but I'm assuming its pretty flat. If you're not use to twisties, try to take it easy and remember that the rear brake is your friend, the Burgman's is pretty good. It will serve you well in the Rockies.

Hey my 100th post! Do I get a cake or something?
 

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I live in Kansas too. It's not completely flat, but flat enough that twisties are the little things on bread plastic bags. Most roads here are on section lines, 1 mile apart and you turn when you change directions. There are curves in a few places, but not very many and none on elevation changes of more than 500 feet.
 

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Most just use the b400s rear brake to substitute for the lack of engine braking. I had to replace mine at 20k. The fronts are lasting to 40k. But I ride a lot of mountains and ride the rear brake pretty hard doing so.

I don't know Kansas riding, but I'm assuming its pretty flat. If you're not use to twisties, try to take it easy and remember that the rear brake is your friend, the Burgman's is pretty good. It will serve you well in the Rockies.

Hey my 100th post! Do I get a cake or something?
Most of my riding is on very steep and very crooked mountain roads. I use very little rear brake on anything I ride. About 90% of my braking is with the front brake. It worked very well on my 400 I had and on the rest of the 15 motorcycles and scooters I have owned over the last 40 years. There is a reason that most bikes have large vented dual rotors on the front and smaller unvented single rotors or drum brakes on the rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, a majority of Kansas is flat, but in some parts like the Flinthills where I live; the rolling hills are beautiful and fun riding. This summer we rode some country roads in the Alta Vista area with plenty of twist and turns, but still not the challenge of the mountains.

Really interesting to see how the rest of you handle mountain riding, but got curious when it comes to rear braking and front braking preference. Here is a link on tips for riding in the mountains and yes, it was for motorcycles but the section of "To Brake" was interesting as it covered why back brake going upward and front going downward. http://www.lazymotorbike.eu/tips/mountains/
 

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Most of my riding is on very steep and very crooked mountain roads. I use very little rear brake on anything I ride. About 90% of my braking is with the front brake. It worked very well on my 400 I had and on the rest of the 15 motorcycles and scooters I have owned over the last 40 years. There is a reason that most bikes have large vented dual rotors on the front and smaller unvented single rotors or drum brakes on the rear.
Sorry, I was addressing the issue of engine braking only. I was not trying to insult Ms Flinthills’ intelligence with mentioning something as common knowledge as 80%+ of a bike’s braking is supplied by the front disk(s).

See seemed concerned that her (I’m assuming the feminine from the “Ms”) scooter lacked the engine braking of her motorcycle riding companion. I was merely pointing out that the rear brake can be utilized as a reasonable substitute; especially in mountainous, curvy roads where one might need the slowing ability of engine braking, without the suspension compression associated with front braking (i.e. like in the middle of a turn).

Obviously the majority of braking should be done with the front brakes before a turn or curve no matter the bike, but the rear brake on a scooter with a straight CVT transmission can be used during a turn to avoid obstacles, deal with unforeseen decreasing radius turns, moderate speed on long downhill curves, etc.; many instances where a motorcyclists would downshift or otherwise utilize engine braking.
 

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I find my Burgman 400's engine braking sufficient in the mountains here in Georgia and Tennessee. I ride with other bikers on manuals and never have to hit my brakes to slow down behind them so I think it does a good job. Only weird time is less than 10mph when it lets go.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sorry, I was addressing the issue of engine braking only. I was not trying to insult Ms Flinthills’ intelligence with mentioning something as common knowledge as 80%+ of a bike’s braking is supplied by the front disk(s).

See seemed concerned that her (I’m assuming the feminine from the “Ms”) scooter lacked the engine braking of her motorcycle riding companion. I was merely pointing out that the rear brake can be utilized as a reasonable substitute; especially in mountainous, curvy roads where one might need the slowing ability of engine braking, without the suspension compression associated with front braking (i.e. like in the middle of a turn).
You were not insulting my intelligence in the least, but addressing my lack of experience which I appreciate. Yes, I am female. ;)
 

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You were not insulting my intelligence in the least, but addressing my lack of experience which I appreciate. Yes, I am female. ;)
Thanks. It's just another tool in the kit of skills. Hope you find it useful.
 

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I've been up to over 14,100 feet (where the road ends at Mt. Evans). Beautiful view.
 

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I have ridden the 400 through the Canadian Rockies to Calgary going through Highway 97 and coming back Highway 1. Also rode to Penticton for a rally a few years back and we rode up and down the mountain ranges. I was the only scooter and they could not believe how I kept up and sometimes out drove them. It does just fine in higher elevations. Have a pleasant safe trip and enjoy. Sally
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Sally, thanks for the feedback! Would have loved to have been along to see the reaction of those that didn't think you could keep up. I noticed that had a 2006 Burgman 400 and this Oct. bought a 2012 Bugrman 400. Did you notice a big difference between the two?
 
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