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Discussion Starter #1
I have a couple of quick questions. 1st is what is the redline for the 400 and secondly what rpm should be expected @ 55 to 65 MPH. I plan on purchasing it new next year, I'm mostly going to travel locally in the five boroughs with minumal highway usage. Thanks.
 

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I don't think you'll see it (redline) on a 400 unless going down a very very long straight steep highway or you are revving it to hell and back on the center stand.

The 650 has a rev limiter. That's a good thing too because I have been there a few times in the manual mode - it's nice knowing that I haven't abused the engine. I am not sure if the 400 has one also.
 

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With the CVT transmission you should never hit "red line". I noticed it is not marked on my wifes '05 400.

As long as you remember to let off the throttle when you take jumps you should be fine. :D :D :D

RPMs will go up slightly as the belt wears, which changes the ratio. The RPM at 55 will also change depending on your weight, cargo, wind, topagraphy, etc., as the ratio changes according to the load in addition to the RPMs. That is one of the great things about the CVT. It is so smooth and efficient that you don't realize how good it is until you put it side by side with a geared bike and open it up.
 

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You can't redline a burgman. My top speed on my 400 was 93 mph and the rpm's was showing 8,000. At 55 mph you will be at 4,500rpm's and at 65 it will be 5,500rpms. The burgman loves the high rpms it is very, very smooth from 4,000 to 8,000rpms.
 

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The only time I hit redline is if I hit the "warp" button while on loose gravel.

;)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you all for your responses, with that info it sounds like the 400 wont be stressed if I venture onto the parkway. Life is grand.
 

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Inferno, I flew to Southern (Palm Beach area) Florida and rode my 400 back (2 days) the 1100+ miles to Texas and I ride 95%+ highway speeds to work and back (35 mile round trip). Add that to the other recommendations that the 400 will 'travel' WELL. :D
 

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bechtoea-

My wife wasn't offered the warp button option when she bought her 400. Probably a good thing. I was considering the nitrous option, so she could keep up on some of our back roads around here. I don't know where to mount the tanks yet, cause she has to have room to carry all the camping gear.

I'll have our youngest daughter on mine, so I have to save space for her cosmetics suitcase, curling iron and hair care bag, outfit accessories suitcase, etc. When she is standing at the door with her crash coat on, and her helmet in her hand, I just can't leave her behind. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ironranger

Thanks for scenario, I have a 15 month old that is sharp as a razer and a wife with a worse tongue. I'll be flying solo, However I would love to see them dressed and ready to go. The chief said if I could come up with the cash I could do whatever I wanted. What do you think?
 

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The bike really is just one part of the package. Protective gear has to be figured in. It adds up quick, especially if vanity kicks in. If you have an accessory dealer close by, you can sometimes get old stock or over stock alot cheaper. Some of the internet dealers have the same deal. Helmets are very different just within the same manufacturer. You have to make sure you are comfortable or your gear will be distracting you rather than protecting you. As for passangers, I don't know your experience. Many recommend a good year of riding on your own. It takes time to get the skills needed to handle yourself, the bike, a passenger, and that car that just pulled out in front of you. You'll get there, just be patient. As for the 400, it can do everything you need it to, including passengers on regional touring trips.

Start looking for gear for any passengers before you get to that point. A passenger needs the same gear that you as the rider needs. God forbid, if you crash, it doesn't matter if you were the rider or passenger when you hit the asphalt. Most people who get on a bike for the first time are hooked if they feel well protected, and safe with you as the driver. They aren't useto the lean on corners, or swerving through traffic. Keep it simple and keep it slow.
 
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