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Discussion Starter #1
I am wondering what kind of gas mileage you are getting on your 400's and 650's? Also, do you run regular unleaded, or 92 octane, or ?
Thanks
 

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1. 40 - 44 mpg average under all driving condtions.
2. Regulra 87 octane

Ride Safe
 

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Comment re Octane rating

Conventional wisdom does point toward running higher octane in high compression engines. However, the recent Suzuki fuel injected engines defy that wisdom. I own a 2003 1000cc Suzuki V-Strom as well as the Burgman 650. The Compression on the V-Strom twin is 11.3:1. It runs sweet on 87 octane gas. It runs bad on higher octane. Guys were putting in higher octane and experiencing "fart stalls" when coming to a stop. Quite a few posts on the V-Strom list about that. A couple of guys had the engine backfire and blow the injector bodies off. The solution was always to go back to 87 octane. No more problems. I experienced the "fart stall" problem several times on the one tank of high-test that I put in the V-Strom. That engine, for sure, likes 87 octane.

Based on that experience, I've only run 87 octane in the Burgman 650. It runs nice on it - no pinging whatsoever. I've done almost 4,000 miles on 87 octane so far. I'm not going to experiment with anything else. Also, here in the Mid-west the mid-grade gasolines contain grain alcohol - which I would rather not put in my engines.
 

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High compression engine in light bodied vehicles (bikes,scooters etc)

Because of the high output of smaller engine and lighter loads that they carry you can run mucher higher compression ratios on low octane fuel, and with computer controlled ignition, efi, anti knock sensors, oxygen sensor etc, makes it all the easier ...

As mentioned on this forum sometimes wrong octane rating will send you backward ...

If this was a car then it would be a different matter ...

Rgds Greg ...
 

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Because of the high output of smaller engine and lighter loads that they carry you can run mucher higher compression ratios on low octane fuel, and with computer controlled ignition, efi, anti non sensors, oxygen sensor etc, makes it all the easier ..............



i understand what your saying but the only thing that doesnt compute to me is why do (all) sportbikes require the high octane gas, and stated in thier owner manuals? i used to own a yamaha R6 before the burger and all my friends own sportbikes as well, they all have to use the 93 gas.? can anyone clear that one up for me?
 

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mactd83 said:
i understand what your saying but the only thing that doesnt compute to me is why do (all) sportbikes require the high octane gas, and stated in thier owner manuals? i used to own a yamaha R6 before the burger and all my friends own sportbikes as well, they all have to use the 93 gas.? can anyone clear that one up for me?
All sportbikes do no require High-Octane gas. If you look in the owners manual, nearly all DO NOT require high octane, but just simple regular 87 octane (r+m/2) gas.
 

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mactd83

If the computer is set to use high octane then yes you use it ...

But it can also be set for lower octane and still run ok ...

Rgds Greg ...
 

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Using High Octane

Using Higher octane fuel than the engine needs does two things.

It cost you more money because it's more expensive and it costs more because you use more of it. There is actually less energy in a gallon of high octane than in a gallon of regular.

Unless an engine is setup to begin with for the high octane, all you are doing is wasting your money and making the oil companies wealthy because it only costs about one cent per gallon to make high octane over regular.
 
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