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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone else have this problem?
The inside of both my legs is all bruised from contact with the leg cutouts in the footrests, because of the way I stop and paddle foot along at lights.
I think it's because my seat is to high maybe.
 

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Stop paddlin then! :lol:

Seriously Rick - get into a parking lot and do some manv'n practice - real slow ridin, turns and stops etc. Pilots call em 'bumps and grinds' I believe.
 

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nope - your legs are too short! :twisted: uh well....

Yeah - what Norm said! - you lil kooky duck walkin, blue executive ridin, canook livin, big arse thread boppin, electric mirrors foldin, windshield snappin, flop knopper!!!

:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

yeah - i bump my shinz every once an a while too!

ps - I try to keep down on the duck walk thing because, welllll - you know.... :p
 

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You should not be paddle walking when you stop & take off. You should touch your feet down when fully stopped, and lift them when ready to take off. It's not that hard, but you do need to go somewhere out of traffic and practice. I can bring my machine to a full stop, pause for a second, and take off without touching a foot down - but it takes a little while to get that comfortable with the scooter.
 

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The only time I 'paddle walk' is backing out of a parking spot. At a full stop it's both feet down (occasionally push back and forth [forward and backward] to stretch) and just take off again. Of course my 400 is 100# lighter but I can't see that it would be any different with a 650. :) I would echo the suggestion of a nice quiet (empty) parking lot and practice (practice, practice). Before you know it you'll be comfortable and you will not lay down your 650 ever again (hopefully!). :D
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Norm, my dad used to call them touch and goes. (He was a bush pilot, and a bomber trainer during the last war)

Good advice though.

I think a big part of the whole problem, as Paul said, is that I not yet gotten used to the machine and haven't developed the ability to balance at real slow speeds yet.

If I rush up to light or a stop sign, and use both brakes, the stop is sort of sudden but smooth, both feet come out and down like landing gear.

But if I am approaching a situation where I may have to stop, or I may not, (depending on whether the cages get moving or not), I slow right down until the clutch lets go and then I get nervous and start wobbling around, usually results in a sudden "save the bike" stop and "foot slammed to the ground just in time" thing. :oops:

I see other bikers doing the smooth controlled creeping stops, and it looks so easy!
Guess I'll have to go practice.

Did notice today while I was riding around "in the rain again" that I'm getting a little more comfortable with the stops.
1000 more times and I'll have it licked. :twisted:

(wish the weather would improve, it's either been sunny and freezing, or wet ever since I got the burg)
 

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Someone mentioned on another thread how they or someone they knew had laid down their bike because their foot slipped on the slick stuff at a gas station. You've probably heard the advice to avoid the center of the lane due to oil and stuff being dripped there by cars -- I'd also suggest avoiding even putting your foot there at a stoplight in town. A time or two my motorcyle's wheels were in one lane or the other, but I came to a stop at the light and noticed that my foot was slipping a bit because it was in an oily spot in the center of the lane.

I think the advice to avoid the center part of the lane only applies when your in town, and maybe only even at intersections, where cars stop and drip. Out in the country I think it's fine to ride in the center. Just ride where it's smoothest.
 

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lilleyen,
As stated you should not be paddle walking, practice a little slow speed riding in the back of an empty parking lot.
You need to hold your balance and the bikes as long as you are moving, How fast? each person is different, I have seen guys with big bikes go slower then a slow walk..
When you come to a stop bring the scooter down to a crawl then pull in your hand brake and stop, in other words don't let the scoot tell you when it will stop. And of course your foot (or feet) go down.as you hit the brake.
Starting up , just give gas and go and the same moment the scoot starts to move lift your feet.
The faster you take off the better it works -fast is a relative word- fast as in like some one starting to run.
A simple rule I use in city driving when starting to move.
You never want to start moving faster then you can stop
.
Practice all this a while and it will become second nature, you may have a little trouble at first because I think you will need to break some bad habits first .
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Dropped into my dealers today and asked him to give me the address of the local upholsterer he mentioned that lowers the seats for him.

He said I should wait a bit until the shocks and seat wear in and settle (about 1500 KMs or so) and see if I still need it.

So, I'll wait a bit and see.
The voice of experience! 8)
 

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lilleyen said:
1000 more times and I'll have it licked. :twisted:
Might be about right, Rick, it just comes with time. As you get out and about you will find yourself being much more confident and smooth.
last year when I first got my 650 I had to work at the slow speed stuff, stopping, starts everything that you will but as they say 'That too will come to pass!'
It will be like riding that bike or driving that car, shifting those gears...second nature and all it takes is time in.

Hang in there!!
 

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It will just take time. As other have stated, the feet should only have to touch down when the scooter is at a complete stop. I've been riding for 20+ years, and find the 650 so well balanced that if the stop is only a quick stop then go I don't put my feet down at all.

I'll add this, though... If it's a stop sign be sure your feet touch down. I was once pulled over by a police officer for not completely stopping. Of course he'd been too far behind be to notice my wheels come to a complete stop, but didn't see my feet come down since I was well balanced. No ticket, but it was his suggestion that my feet come down at a stop sign even if they don't need to.

Dave B.
 

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You've probably heard the advice to avoid the center of the lane due to oil and stuff being dripped there by cars -- I'd also suggest avoiding even putting your foot there at a stoplight in town. A time or two my motorcyle's wheels were in one lane or the other, but I came to a stop at the light and noticed that my foot was slipping a bit because it was in an oily spot in the center of the lane.

I think the advice to avoid the center part of the lane only applies when your in town, and maybe only even at intersections, where cars stop and drip. Out in the country I think it's fine to ride in the center. Just ride where it's smoothest.
Next time you are on the freeway notice the black stripe down the center of each lane. Better to ride on one side or the other of it.
 

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gruntled said:
Next time you are on the freeway notice the black stripe down the center of each lane. Better to ride on one side or the other of it.
I guess my advice depends a bit on traffic volume. I spent a week in L.A. for work once, so I supposed with your traffic volumes out there, there's a lot more oil on the roads. Where I am there are some urban areas and some higher-volume roads that might have more oil dripped on them. In that case the center of the lane should be avoided, especially when it just starts raining. But for the most part there are fewer cars travelling the roads and less oil gets dripped on them. If you're poking around on backroads where there's only 1 car going by every few minutes, there isn't much oil to drip on the roads. So in that case it's fine to use any part of the lane.

I should mention, though, that in my MSF class they said to use the whole road, and that it's been shown that traction in the center of the lane was the same as elsewhere. I can say that that is wrong in the place where my foot was planted on a greasy spot at a stoplight (obviously when cars are sitting above that spot all the time, oil will be dripped there), but overall I would say they are correct.
 

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My two cents worth (1.4 cents worth Canadian) is that if you were on a regular motorcycle, you would feather the clutch at low speeds to maintain that creeping speed. On the Burgy, the same thing can be accomplished by hovering the rpms around 3000 right at the point where the clutch engages. It'll move right along very easily at a slow walking pace when you get the hang of it. The trick is to be SLLOOOWWWWW with the throttle, both on and off. Gunning it and then letting it spring back when you want to slow down takes away alot of the feeling of control. The Burgy 400 was designed for stop and go city traffic, so it will do whatever you want, and when you get the hang of it, it will float effortlessly at very slow speeds. Just practice the SLOW throttle.
 

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lilleyen said:
Does anyone else have this problem?
The inside of both my legs is all bruised from contact with the leg cutouts in the footrests, because of the way I stop and paddle foot along at lights.
I think it's because my seat is to high maybe.
lilleyen, Something that noone has mentioned is that you will also notice a differant balance in if you put both feet down at the same time or if you put one down just slightly ahead of the other or if you only put your left foot down completely first like you would if you were riding a conventional m/c with a foot brake. I think you will find that how and when you put your feet down will have a direct impact on how the bike balances during your stop. :wink: Hope this helps

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #16
A couple of things;

Yes, I have noticed that if I put both feet down at the same time, I balance better. Keeping my head and view UP as my instructors taught me helps too, NOT looking down at the road so much. Probably a perspective/balance thing.

Thanks for all the helpful suggestions everybody

As for the oil thing, I am a little confused.
I know the center lane (at intersections), is usually oily.
If I put my wheels on the non-oily parts, how do I avoid putting my feet down in the oily part? That's the only place left isn't it? :?
 

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Carefully, almost dropped my Wing at a stop light, was in the right tire track and didn't notice how oily the center was before puting my foot down. :( But kept it up :roll: .
 

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lilleyen said:
...As for the oil thing, I am a little confused.
I know the center lane (at intersections), is usually oily.
If I put my wheels on the non-oily parts, how do I avoid putting my feet down in the oily part? That's the only place left isn't it? :?
Depending on the slope of the road, if any; if you're going to put your left foot down put your wheels just to the left of the oil spot -- then your left foot will be on clean pavement.

If you're going to put your right foot down, move just to the right of the oil patch.

In either case there will still be plenty of room between you and the next lane for safety.

Unless it's been dry for a while and then just started raining, it's okay to stop in the center of the lane, and then you can use either or both feet; the oil patch isn't usually very wide, and unless it's been accumulating for a while and then brought up by a recent rain it's not all that slippery. Not if you've been planning ahead and maintaining a proper following distance, that is; I wouldn't want to do a panic stop on it.

If I have to choose I'd rather have my tires on oily pavement, and keep my feet on clean pavement at stops since they're what keep me from tipping over.
 

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Rick, I think that you might want to consider getting your saddle lowered sooner then later. You need to have confidence and control of your bike at all times. If you don’t feel that you have total control of your bike in all situations that can lead to problems. As others have suggested you need to do some practice in an environment where traffic is not a concern. My other suggestion is to ride with someone or a group of riders who are experienced as they can assist you in developing your riding skills. One of the things that assisted me greatly in developing my riding skills was riding with experienced riders.
 

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Buy a pair of good motorcycle boots with non-slip sole, like Sidi or something. Not only won't your feet slip, but also these boots will protect you from briuses, 'cause they are rather high and leather is rather stiff.
 
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