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Discussion Starter #1
I've read previous threads about breaking in a Burg 400 or Burg 650.

Once I get to 500 miles can I just ride like usual? How much babying does the 400 really need after 500 miles?

The reason it is taking me so long to break in my 400 as I like to ride fast (over 60 mph) so this means at least 5500-6000 RPM. Hence, my break-in period is taking months and not weeks in order to stay below 5000 RPM.

Once I can open the 400 to 7000-8000 RPM the bike becomes a more realistic way to travel for me.

Again, I know some think "I can ride it like I stole it" right from the dealer but Suzuki recommends a break-in period and they know best.
 

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Yes, you are right to follow the book instructions with this engine. It is not a good engine to run in using the 'Motoman' fast racing technique due to the damage that can occur to bearings, piston and cylinder. Once you have 500 miles on the clock you can take her to 6,500rpm, easing her up a little at a time for longer periods each time, until you have 1000 miles on the clock. Then you ease her up a little at a time towards to 8,500rpm + area over the next 500 miles if you need to. But don't go in the red. Remember, the engine doesn't magically become run in at 1500 miles, but you can treat it much more normally. It should give it's best performance and fuel economy after around 5-6k miles when all the main conforming should be over.
 

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I tend to agree with the above but would also remind you to at least get the bike up to speed quickly and have the clutch fully engaged. Most of the clutch squealing and glazing comes from people babying the 400 to much and not having the clutch fully engaged from stop lights.
 

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As JohnK stated big thing with the 400's to is don't baby it off the line even if new. Open the throttle to 5000 rpm to take of & then adjust for desired speed. As with any new engine big thing is to very the rpm's when breaking them in. I wouldn't be concerned to take it up to 6000 for a couple of miles than drop down to 5500 for a couple more than back to 5000 rpm. If you do that you will find that 500 miles will go buy very quickly. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This means NO HIGHWAY RIDING for the fist 1000 miles as the Burg 400 requires over 7,000 RPM for major interstates in the USA. For me I need at least 7500-8000 PRM for highway riding.
 

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my advice, just ride it as you will normally do, dont take trips longer than 1 hour and dont go red on RPMs and update your profile it shows you got a 2012, or did you get it 0 miles?
 

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Maniac, it requires 2-3 days to break in the bike till the first service. You could do it in one long weekend if you get to it. Find some mountains and make a trip there. Do normal riding, not hurrying not lugging. Make a couple of 30-45 min stops to let the engine cool off. You can take pictures during these breaks ;)

Mountain roads will do the rest for ya.
 

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Hence, my break-in period is taking months and not weeks in order to stay below 5000 RPM.
I think I racked up 600 miles in the first week going at 5k rpm. You're in Florida and can ride this time of year. Find a buddy and hit the open road for a nice, leisurely ride to Miami or something. I've had a couple of siblings live there, its a beautiful state. Surely you can find some roads to cruise 55 for 600 miles.

Have a good time. You're gonna love the bike!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I purchased a leftover 2012 Burgman 400 brand new. Zero miles on the odometer.

Once I get over 500 miles can I safely go up to 75 mph indicated for short bursts? Also, at 1,000 miles can I go up to 8000 rpm for short burst?
 

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No more than 6200 rpm before the 1000 milestone. Short bursts only if they short :D
 

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Rpm are not really important, "LOAD" is what counts and thats a matter of feel rathner than instrumentation.

Geoff.
 

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I put a mark on the twist grip at 1/4 throttle and use up to that fo the first 250 miles
then 1/3 for the next and so on, don't bother to much about revs but do close the throttle often, never had a bad engine yet.
 

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You can go to 6,500 rpm once you have 500 miles on the clock. That should give an indicated 70 mph on a newer bike with standard variator rollers. As Ralph says, close the throttle often to suck oil up the barrel to wash and cool the piston and rings. That's important on our 400's since they use Nicasil on the inside of the cylinder. It's very soft to allow conforming to happen easily.
 

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I did a little checking today.

I don't know how everyone else's scoot will be, but for me (at around 245 pounds), if I stay at 4,000 RPM after I'm started, I can get to around 30 mph. That's basically below the speed limits around here unless you're in a school zone.

I just can't fathom riding 500 miles at up to 30 miles per hour.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I did a little checking today.

I don't know how everyone else's scoot will be, but for me (at around 245 pounds), if I stay at 4,000 RPM after I'm started, I can get to around 30 mph. That's basically below the speed limits around here unless you're in a school zone.

I just can't fathom riding 500 miles at up to 30 miles per hour.

The reason it is taking me so long to get over 500 miles is the 5,000 RPM limit. Once I get to 500 miles (a few weeks more) I'll open her up to 6500 or so. Then, the Burgman becomes more useful to me. At 1,000 miles on the odometer I'll finally be able to hit the highway at 8000 RPM. This bike needs RPMs to generate any kind of real speed.
 

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I would ride it like you would normally ride the bike. Breakin periods are more affected by the heating and cooling cycle than speed. Just ride your bike normally.
 

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The reason it is taking me so long to get over 500 miles is the 5,000 RPM limit. Once I get to 500 miles (a few weeks more) I'll open her up to 6500 or so. Then, the Burgman becomes more useful to me. At 1,000 miles on the odometer I'll finally be able to hit the highway at 8000 RPM. This bike needs RPMs to generate any kind of real speed.
Seriously this will do more harm than good. A new motor needs to be worked progressively. You won't actually wreck a modern engine by what you are doing any more than screwing in straight out of the box but what you will most certainly do is fail to release its full potential.

Geoff.
 

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I did a little checking today.

I don't know how everyone else's scoot will be, but for me (at around 245 pounds), if I stay at 4,000 RPM after I'm started, I can get to around 30 mph. That's basically below the speed limits around here unless you're in a school zone.

I just can't fathom riding 500 miles at up to 30 miles per hour.
Not even certain mine will actually get to 30 but even if it does the clock is fast so your likely only doing 27 mph at best, wonder if anyone at Suzuki ever actually ran one at 4000 rpm, or just pinched the lump about running in from another manual as I suspect they did, my SV 650 would do over 70 at 4000 rpm
 

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As Ralph M theorized, I would agree.

I'd be interested to hear from some 650 riders as to how fast they are going (per speedo) at 4,000 RPM.

I'm sure a Goldwing is really hoofing it down the road at that speed.

As I said, I tend to agree with Ralph M's idea - Suzuki probably doesn't bother to do a lot model specific stuff in certain areas of their owner's manuals.
 

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I would ride it like you would normally ride the bike. Breakin periods are more affected by the heating and cooling cycle than speed. Just ride your bike normally.
Bingo! That is the same advice I've been give on EVERY new motorcycle or scooter I've ever bought. Haven't had a dud in any of them.
Don't "ride it like you stole it", but don't "baby" it too much either.
Heating and cooling cycles are the main thing.
 
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