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It's been so long I hardly remember. But I think most agree 2k is when its fully broken in. For the first 600 miles keep it under 60 mph, then get your first service. Add 10 mph for every 600 miles after that. I'm sure someone will write in with a more accurate schedule.

But most important is to blip the throttle to 4500 rpm at takeoff to get the clutch engaged. Then adjust you speed once its engaged. Doing slow starts will prematurely glaze and wear out the clutch. You want to get it fully engaged ASAP with every start.

Congratulations and welcome to BUSA!
 

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A couple months ago, I was sitting in my recliner doing searches on oil. Clicking links that lead me all over the place. Ended up at one written by an engineer whose field was engines. He said a modern engine is broken in during the first 50 miles. Modern manufacturing techniques do not leave the high ridges on the bore machining as in years past. It was those irregularities that required breaking in, to smooth out.
I don't think anyone on this forum who has ridden their new scooter normally out the box, without a break in period, has experienced any problems with reliability or oil use down the line. At the 600 mile check, throw in full synthetic if you like. Your engine will have turned more than 300,000 revolutions in the first 50 miles. If going slow makes you happy, then do it. Won't hurt, but won't help, either.
 

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Coulam, congrats on the bike. I'd use the book method of running in. Check your owners manual for details.

Yogurt, as an auto engineer I can tell you those ridges are put there for a reason, so the engine runs in properly. The ridges wear in a way that allows the rings and piston to fully seal in the cylinder. It's the ridges (or honing) that holds the oil on the cylinder bore to lubricate the piston and rings. What must happen during break in is the very high spots on those ridges should be worn off. Manufacturers use a variety of methods to finish their engines. Some will carryout a full hone with almost no 'Plato Honing' being present. This means you must follow the book method of running in religiously to avoid premature engine damage. Others will use 'Plato Honing' to some degree meaning the engine can be run faster during break in but running in must still happen. The other point to consider is the cylinder bore material and whether it has a coating. The 400 uses Nicasil. With the 400, too much throttle too soon on Nicasil coated bores wears off too much metal and will disproportionately wear the cylinder. This means the engine will age more quickly and will start to lose power and economy, plus use oil later in it's life. If you are really heavy during break in with the throttle you can glaze the bores (wear off the honing/ridges) so oil does not stick well to the cylinder bores. Conversely, if you go too easy with the throttle during break in you can also glaze the bores as you don't get the metal to metal contact needed to run the engine in. Thus the piston, rings etc never properly fit so you lose compression, lose power and economy, and the whole engine wears early due to oil contaminates. So it pays to follow the book method on the Burgman 400 IMHO. Also, running in is not just about the piston and rings. It's everything including the bottom end bearings and transmission. Roller ball and needle roller bearings as in the 400 don't like being loaded aggressively during the first few hundred miles due to the danger of compressive wear damage. Even these days, some of these bearings need to work harden before full throttle is used.
 

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Quantum,
Thanks for the explanation. You mentioned several of the items in the article I had forgotten, like the Plato honing. Nicasil is a frequent mention in the various motorcycle magazine reports. Enjoyed reading your response. Thanks for the heads up.
 
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