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Discussion Starter #1
You're in a curve going downhill and there's a stop sign up ahead.

How do you handle it?
 

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Finish the curve and then brake.
 

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on my 650 I give her just enough gas to keep the engine braking and prevent freewhelling. This will usually slow me to about 6-9 mph, I then straighten, put out my legs, and brake while lightly draging my feet (for increased stability) as I come to the full stop.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
billmeek said:
Finish the curve and then brake.
I guess I wasn't clear. I meant when you approach the stop sign you're still in the curve.
 

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I guess it really depends on the exact situation. I've never ran into a stop sign in a curve that was not posted before the curve or was in a curve so sharp that I felt unsafe applying brakes necessary to stop. During the MSF Basic Rider Course they did cover being in a curve and needing to brake. What we did was straighten up in the curve and brake hard (panic stop). It's one of the tasks we practiced on the riding couse.
 

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Assuming you're approaching at a reasonable speed, just gradually bring the bike up out of the lean as you apply both brakes and bring the bike to a stop with the bike in the upright position.
If you're "overcooking it" in the turn and suddenly you see the "STOP" sign coming up fast, quickly bring the bike up out of the lean into the upright position and THEN firmly apply both brakes without locking them up. (remember your MSF exercise on stopping quickly in a curve?). You don't want to get on the brakes hard with the bike leaned over.
Ideally, you don't turn while braking and don't brake while turning. :D
 

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DonRich90 said:
If you're "overcooking it" in the turn and suddenly you see the "STOP" sign coming up fast, quickly bring the bike up out of the lean into the upright position and THEN firmly apply both brakes without locking them up.
Exactly what I was talking about...but phrasedmuch better. Thanks.
 

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Always use a late apex on the street. Don't turn in to the apex until you can see around the corner and exit. You will always be all lined up for whatever might be in front of you. A stop sign in a corner is the same as a car stopped in the middle of a turn. Coming in to the turn late will allow you to take any exit line you need. If you hug the inside of a turn all the way around there are only two choices, hitting what's in your way or going into the other lane.
Practice by making extremely late and wide entries into the turn. Do that a few times and you will see how straight you can be as you exit the turn. Give it a try.

Thanx
Russ

P.S. The Burgman really likes this because it help with ground clearance issues. Yes, the Burgman drags hard on the ground when pushed.
 

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you can brake in a turn if you know what to expect. The Front will stand the bike up - the rear will bring it in tighter, but with less effect.

If you lock the front in a turn, you can still survive, but you will be way off your line. If you lock the rear (common in road racing) - you may step out the back a little.

I had a situation where a tight turn really caught me unawares, I was way too fast, I did not sqeeze the anchors, I just looked in the direction of the turn and hiked out -
 

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I would recommend to every rider that he/she practice braking while turning. It can be done, quite effectively, and without misadventures. I find that the Burgman (650 anyway) is especially adept at leaned-over braking, due to it's uncommon engine braking ability (which I happen to love, and use to it's greatest potential whenever possible).

Of course you won't brake as hard as you would if you were perpendicular to the roadway, but you can easily avoid most surprise obstacles with practice, and bring the bike to a complete stop in much less distance than you might expect.

The secret of course, is modulation. Learn how the brakes feel on every road surface you might encounter. (Start slow!) Yes, this means applying the brake (start with one wheel at a time - first the rear, then the front - then when you're comfortable, use both) until the tire begins to skid. (Again - start slow!) Then start practicing at relatively small angles.

The same holds for our wonderful engine braking. With proper throttle modulation, you won't even know it's there until you need it.

Honestly, I don't even think about what I'm doing when I brake anymore, unless it's a potential panic situation, and in those situations the most important thing is - don't panic. Practice = proficiency. Do it until it's mindless. 8)
 

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JohnnyDeath said:
I then straighten, put out my legs, and brake while lightly draging my feet (for increased stability) as I come to the full stop.
Hey Johnny, work on being able to stop without dragging your feet. Having your legs and feet sticking out as outriggers while moving will actually make the bike less stable. You also run the risk of snagging a foot on something on the road surface that could cause ya problems.
The only reason to put your feet on the ground should be to hold the bike up after you stop. Practice on balancing the bike while nearly stopped. With a little experience you can actually come to a momentary stop without taking your feet of the floorboards and then proceed if it's safe to do so. :D
Don
 

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Russ gives the right answer. If you are positioned correctly on the road, and your roadspeed matched to the curve - ie no faster than a speed from which you can stop if a solid object appeared in your path around the bend - then you dramatically lessen the chance of facing these problems. Road poistioning and travelling at the appropriate speed is everything.

Conversely, imagine that it's not stop sign that lies around the bend, but a queue of traffic waiting at that stop sign, and you've now got 20m to brake to a halt from 40mph, and you are leant over at 60 degrees not certain if your tyres can take both the g-force from the banking and from braking without sliding... Now you are in trouble, and it's going to hurt. However, if you were positioned correctly allowing clear vision through the bend at an appropriate speed, holding off acceleration until you could see around the bend, you would be simply cruising to a calm halt whilst continuing your conversation with your wife over the intercom system.

Good luck.
 
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