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I have a 2008 Burgman 650, and was wondering if new pipes And air filter really help performance. Can anybody help?
 

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I agree with LeDude one of our resident experts here . I've seen a lot of muffler drilling , air box hacking , carburation hacking etc etc on scooters over the years . What 99.99% of it accomplished was ruined or badly messed up scooters . That said some scooters like the Honda Big Ruckus needed larger jets in the carb , Honda stuck smaller than needed jets in them to get them by California's air quality regs . Also there is nothing wrong with beefing up things like your suspension to suit your needs . But messing with fuel intake and exhaust for performance can be a real can of worms . The 650 Burg has enough problems without an owner adding to them . Want a race bike ? Then buy a race bike . That's my 2 cents .

TheReaper!
 

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It's called the sport mode button.
 

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An exhaust and air filter will get you a little better performance at higher speed/rpm's but you'll give up some at the lower end/starting off. I did the carbon fiber Yoshi exhaust more for looks and sound rather than performance. If I really wanted to improve performance I'd loose 100 lbs. :D
 

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The first thing to understand is the AN650 is NOT aerodynamic. So many things dirtying up the air flow. The front finder could use a reshaping, right behind that is a huge parachute of a radiator intake. The windshild, another parachute. The mirrors, sidestand, exhaust pipes, centerstand are all hanging out in the airstream. Then there's the rider.

Tuck all that above into a form fitting "Dust-Bin" fairing with a tapered tail and I bet the same bike gains 20 MPH and 15 MPG.

Maybe have Delta Cams in Tacoma WA grind some hotter cams. Then the cone type cold air intake. Aftermarket pipes. Add a Power Commander to adjust fuel. A NOS kit.

Bigger rims and tires. Better suspension.

Whats this all add up to?
 

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Somewhere in there you will have to throw in reprogramming the controller for the CVT. The reason is that most tactics to increase the power of the engine will end up changing the torque curve. The controller for the CVT is programmed to take advantage of the existing power curve. If you alter that power curve you will have to alter the shifting pattern of the CVT to take advantage of it. Otherwise you waste a lot of money.

The only way to get around it is to shift the bike manually so you can match it to the new power curve. Of course doing that negates much of the advantage of a CVT as you trade an unlimited number of ratios for just the six pre-programmed ones that manual mode allows.
 
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