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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Went to the dentist today for the normal checkup and cleaning. On the way home a truck in front of me changed lanes and at the same time dropped some trash. Some of that trash was rebar pieces. Well one of those rebar chunks bounced and I hit it. I got stopped at a red light and the truck did not and turned off a few blocks up. I could not find it when I turned down that street so I went home. I started to smell antifreeze as I was pulling into my driveway. Yep, smashed radiator. Man was I steamed. I took it out and dug out my 2003 650's radiator and man o man, their the same. :thumbup: The first pic is of the 2008 radiator with my 2003 screen on it. The 2008 screen is also trashed.

Both were caked in mud from the front wheel. I need a mud flap.

[attachment=2:3ilmx1ir]Pin hole.jpg[/attachment:3ilmx1ir][attachment=1:3ilmx1ir]Side by side.jpg[/attachment:3ilmx1ir][attachment=0:3ilmx1ir]Mud Cake.jpg[/attachment:3ilmx1ir]
 

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Discussion Starter #2
And YES while I had this radiator out I did put in some Iridium plugs. The plugs I took out have 36,000 miles and the only thing I see wrong is the gap was at about 0.041" and the spec's are 0.028" to 0.031". The Iridium's are gapped at 0.030".
 

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Dave_J said:
Went to the dentist today for the normal checkup and cleaning. On the way home a truck in front of me changed lanes and at the same time dropped some trash. Some of that trash was rebar pieces. Well one of those rebar chunks bounced and I hit it. I got stopped at a red light and the truck did not and turned off a few blocks up. I could not find it when I turned down that street so I went home. I started to smell antifreeze as I was pulling into my driveway. Yep, smashed radiator. Man was I steamed. I took it out and dug out my 2003 650's radiator and man o man, their the same. :thumbup: The first pic is of the 2008 radiator with my 2003 screen on it. The 2008 screen is also trashed.

Both were caked in mud from the front wheel. I need a mud flap.

[attachment=2:2os4b43p]Pin hole.jpg[/attachment:2os4b43p][attachment=1:2os4b43p]Side by side.jpg[/attachment:2os4b43p][attachment=0:2os4b43p]Mud Cake.jpg[/attachment:2os4b43p]
OMG.........Better that it was only the radiator ....AND.....not you!!!! Rebar could have done a lot of damage to your face.....!!! Parts can always be replaced.!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm going to clean up the 08 radiator and see if the local Community Collage can TIG weld up the hole. I could if I had a TIG machine. I can not MIG weld small aluminum stuff.

I'm not cheap, just frugal.
 

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Too bad about that radiator Dave. Good thing you had a spare. As for the clown that could not manage to secure his load - well - Karma is a bitch.

Glad to hear the only casualty was your radiator. It could have been worse. Rebar can do so much more damage - like to the body or cause a wreck.
 

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Rebar is short for re-enforcement bar - steel rods used to re-enforce concrete.

When I see your 2003 radiator I'm glad I have a mudflap on my front fender.

Dave, do you think a radiator shop would be able to do a re-core on a Burgman radiator?
 

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Steve D UK said:
What is 'Rebar'?
Steve.sorry about the long posting....BUT......you did ask.....!!!!!!!!

Rebar is common steel reinforcing bar, an important component of reinforced concrete and reinforced masonry structures. It is usually formed from mild steel, and is given ridges for better frictional adhesion to the concrete.

Concrete is a material that is very strong in compression, but virtually without strength in tension. To compensate for this imbalance in concrete's behavior, rebar is formed into it to carry the tensile loads.

Masonry structures and the mortar holding them together have similar properties to concrete and also have a limited ability to carry tensile loads. Some standard masonry units like blocks and bricks are made with strategically placed voids to accommodate rebar, which is then secured in place with grout. This combination is known as reinforced masonry.

While any material with sufficient tensile strength could conceivably be used to reinforce concrete, steel and concrete have similar coefficients of thermal expansion: a concrete structural member reinforced with steel will experience minimal stress as a result of differential expansions of the two interconnected materials caused by temperature changes.

Although rebar has ridges that bind it mechanically to the concrete with friction, it can still be pulled out of the concrete under high stresses, an occurrence that often precedes a larger-scale collapse of the structure. To prevent such a failure, rebar is either deeply embedded into adjacent structural members, or bent and hooked at the ends to lock it around the concrete and other rebars. This first approach increases the friction locking the bar into place while the second makes use of the high compressive strength of concrete.

Common rebar is made of unfinished steel, making it susceptible to rusting. As rust takes up greater volume than the iron or steel from which it was formed, it causes severe internal pressure on the surrounding concrete, leading to cracking, spalling, and ultimately, structural failure. This is a particular problem where the concrete is exposed to salt water, as in bridges built in areas where salt is applied to roadways in winter, or in marine applications. Epoxy-coated rebar or stainless steel rebar may be employed in these situations at greater initial expense, but significantly lower expense over the service life of the project. Fiber-reinforced polymer rebar is now also being used in high-corrosion environments.

Most grades of steel used in rebar cannot accept welding; such as, to adjacent steel plates or as means to bind single pieces of rebar together. However, special grades of rebar steel and welding rods make welding by expert welders possible.

To prevent workers from accidentally impaling themselves, the protruding ends of steel rebar are often bent over or covered with special plastic "mushroom" caps.
 

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Glad you're OK, Like someone said above it could have been much worse.


Is it my eyes or is the 08 bigger than the 03 radiator?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This incident was not that bad. I was doing about 35 MPH in a 45 MPH zone. I knew the light was going to change. The traffic was slowing down when the truck had to swerve left and punch it thru the amber light. I seen the trash scattering and did not think too much about it till the cardboard box broke open and rebar in lengths of 2 to 12 inches was bouncing all over.

What caused the pin hole was most likely the radiators shield when it got bent back.

And THANKS Gbjbany, I ordered one of those. $40 is a lot for such a small part but how much is a new radiator??? Coming from Spain.
 

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Dave, Costco's moss killer comes in a black gallon container. It works perfectly to cut down to make a mudflap with. And I can't believe you have no moss in your yard, even though you live south of me.

I attached my "mud flap" with double sided tape and added some black duct tape to reinforce it. 25,000 miles later and it is still working great.

Chris
 

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I installed one of those carbon fiber "Fenda Extenda's" last summer and am very pleased with it. It truly IS made of carbon fiber and weighs next to nothing but with a good number of gravel road miles behind me it has held up well and does a good job. Installation is a lot easier if you take off the front fender and that also gives you the chance to clean the surface of your plastic fender entirely. I used JB Weld on mine and then sealed the cracks around the fender where it meets the extender with silicone so that it doesn't hold water between the surfaces. I did not need to use any screws and the extender looks like it was made for the bike...perfect fit. Now I know that a chunk of gravel won't damage my radiator and it keeps road junk off the bottom of the bike and radiator too. I'm sure that a piece of rebar would crack it but I'd rather replace a mud shield than a radiator any day.

Ordering and delivery is fast and hassle free...took about 5 days from Spain to Missouri. Paid with PayPal. Maybe a little pricey but worth every penny.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Daboo said:
Dave, Costco's moss killer comes in a black gallon container. It works perfectly to cut down to make a mudflap with. And I can't believe you have NO moss in your yard, even though you live south of me.

I attached my "mud flap" with double sided tape and added some black duct tape to reinforce it. 25,000 miles later and it is still working great.

Chris
Chris, If I could kill the GRASS I have a perfectly green back yard. :D Remember, I live out in the sticks. My moss has a moss problem. :lol: Whats the Spanish word, NO MOSS. :twisted:
 

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Is it glued into place ?
 

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Not exactly purty, but excellent rad protection........cut from the side of a plastic oil bottle and held on with 2 sided 3M automotive tape.



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