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Discussion Starter #1
The AN400 is unavailable in Oz, instead we get the AN250, which appears to be identical to the AN400 but with 150cc's less. Suzuki, go figure.

My Big Burger had it's 1000km service yesterday, and the shop provided me with a loan of an AN250 for the day - the difference is absolutely chalk and cheese. The only advantage the 250 had over it's big brother was the comparative ease with which I could put the bike onto and off the centre stand. In all other respects, acceleration, wind protection, smoothness, the 650 had it all.

The AN250 felt strained under acceleration, with the tacho bouncing off 4000rpm for any sort of meaningful getaway (could be the size of the rider - oops), and the wind - clearly the Givi Touring screen I've fitted to the 650 is providing more protection than I give it credit for.

Also it may have also been just that bike, but at 100kmh (60mph) it seemed to shimmy a bit if I moved the handlebars a touch. I didn't feel comfortable to take it any faster.

There were similarities - underseat luggage space, the general feel of the bike, but after 2 months on the Burger King, I'm afraid I'm spoilt for anything less. I love my 650 - and I'd be reluctant to ride anything else.

Cheers,
 

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Hey Scooterbob,

First time riding a 250, eh? :thumbleft: The AN250 is the main seller in the AN range in the largest scoter market in the world - Japan. The AN400 has no changes apart fro a bored out motor, and ussroundig parts. The seat height, plastics, wheels, suspension are all the same. Why do they both exist? Because the liciense catagories in Japan (250/400/unlimited) demand that bikes of these specific engine capacities (250/400) are available for punters to buy. The 650 is a totally different machine to the 250/400.

I think that the advantages that the AN250 have over the 650 are numerous, depending on you intended use.
For dense city riders - cost of tyres, brakes, fuel economy, engine maintenance, ease of riding in dense cities, general ease of riding.
For those on a budget - cos of ownership (extremely low)
For those that want a fun and 'young machine' - easy to ride, and fun.
For those that ride in wet wather a lot - combined brakes make it brake very securely in the wet, without the expense of the Executive and its ABS.
It must be noted that the AN400 as a simple bore up shares all thee attributes, too.

Benefits of the 650?
To the highway cruiser, tandem rider, long tourer, drag racer: obvious - power, wind protection, stability, more brakes, motorycle frame, etc. Totally different machines for different uses.

Naturally, being a 250 single it will feel somewhat more breatheless than a 650cc parallel twin... :?: :roll: As you know, CVT linked engines are tuned for torque, so the AN250's CVT anchors the engine in the 4,000rpm torque zone to give it decent shove (for a 170kg 250 single) when you turn the throttle. The 650's CVT anchors the engine in a similar one to give us instant access to 50ft lbs of torque. In this way, they are actually remarkably similar...

Handling wise, I'd be confident to say that one you are used to the quick steering set-up you would give yourself a hiding on your 650 on tight bends below 50mph - the AN250, Relfex 250 and Majesty 250 handle so well at these speeds that little can get past them. Although the 650 is amazingly stable and a devstating fast tourer, on a downhill mountain pass the rear biased, combined brake systemed, light and quick turning AN250/Reflex 250 are without doubt faster.

Next time you get a chance to ride one, find the twistiest downhill road you can and the fastest looking full race leathered race rep rider - after a couple of downhill runs he'll wish that he had never met you... :wink:

Lycheed
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Lycheed,

I'm sure there is a ready market for the AN250, and don't get me wrong, for a 250 it was quite capable - I guess it's horses for courses.

I'm closing up on 40 and chose the 650 for cruising to work (50 mile round trip and cars are frankly boring), ease of parking in secure underground carpark at work (and not having to pay for parking the car) and two up riding with my favourite girl on those glorious sunny weekends.

If I were a city dweller and wanted a capable, capacious machine for getting around town - it'd be the 250 (although I'd like to have had ride of the 400 - my comment concerning Suzuki was more exasperation at their reasons for limiting the types of machines here in Australia (we don't get the Executive, you can have any colour you want as long as it's silver (shades of Henry Ford) and its either the 250 or the 650 when clearly Suzuki manufacture the 400 (and as you say, its just a matter of boring the cylinder - not hard....) I for one, while I'm happy with silver would like to have had the choice of the blue at least)).

Overall, as has been said before in many fora - the concept of the Burgman (and okay, I'm just a little biased) especially the AN650 is the future of motorcycling. There are no gears to concern oneself with, there is bags of luggage space (even more if Suzuki looked at the space in front of the seat and perhaps did away with the lockable box, maybe replacing it with a 25 or 30 litre stowage compartment that would sit where a fuel tank normally sits on a conventional (read last old fashioned) motorcycle so you could dig your knees into....hmmm now where have I seen that before....that's right, Honda have it as a concept bike), and the ability to change modes and gears is outstanding.

250, 400 or 650 - Burgman's the go. If Suzuki released a 1000cc version, I'm sure Highway Patrol's the world over would jump at them, all that space to carry equipment (radar, laser, breath testing kit, paperwork, maybe even a little laptop for licence and warrant checks...) and a vehicle which would nail 200kmh and be quick at it. (I've heard reports the AN650 has been clocked at 180kmh, actual speed, not indicated).

Cheers,
 
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