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Discussion Starter #1
After many years of usage and a lot of swapping between my summer sport shield and the Clearview, I apparently managed to over-tighten one of the well nuts. You know the story... hit a bump at 70 mph... instant 2 inch crack.

I've already drilled a hole at the end of the crack, now I just want to glue the crack back together.
 

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You could try taking a woodburning tool to the crack ( a soldering iron works better) and melting the plastic together. Use the tool to push the plastic pieces back against each other. I have used that on the plastic of my Cavalcade with good results. Not sure if it will work on all types of plastic.
 

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I would leave it alone. The more you mess with it, the worse it will look. The drill hole should solve the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Although I am not interested in melting the crack back together because of how it would look, I most certainly do want to glue it. The amount of wind pressure exerted on this barn door is huge when getting buffeting from trucks at 80mph. I want to glue it for the sake of structure integrity.
 

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I would call or email Clearview and ask what they recommend.
There are specific solvents that will weld the crack completely but you need to know the material.
 

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I would call or email Clearview and ask what they recommend.
There are specific solvents that will weld the crack completely but you need to know the material.
When my Clearview broke with about a 2" crack from one of its mounting holes, I called them and they said the only thing that may work would be to drill a small hole to stop the crack. I drilled it but it wasn't long before it fully broke at 75 MPH and went flying. I fixed the problem with a Givi.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If CV won't give an answer, it would appear the options are wide open for what to use. :mad:
 

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Assuming the windshield is either acrylic or polycarbonate, the best gluing method would be a solvent glue like IPS Weld-On #3 or #4. It is water thin, similar to many cyanoacrylates, and needs to be applied to the edge and allowed to wick into the joint. Basically melts the pieces together. You probably cannot use the low VOC type products (syrupy consistency often sold in tubes) to get any kind of joint strength.

small cans of the solvent glue and applicators can bo found at most any plastic supply house or you can order it here
 

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I've been there, done that - I had a cracked ClearView XXL as well. Clearview will NOT, repeat, NOT recommend any 'glue' or repair on the windshield due to liability issues. SO do not bother asking them. I guarantee you they will tell you that.

If you search, I had documented my problems with my ClearView. I searched, spent the money, got the acrylic glue, taped, drilled and glued the crack (the crack started by the bottom left hold and traveled up and inboard.

The glue did not work, though I specifically and carefully followed the instructions. The windsheld flex was too much. It continued to crack and finally at 70 mph it let loose. I had to immed slow and grab the shield to keep it from flying off.

I did not try the soldering iron thing on the acrylic. I am pretty convinced that the best way to go is to just eat the loss and get another windshield. Lucky for me, another member up the road a few miles offered to loan me his spare OEM windshield until I can get mine here (Canal Winchester, OH) from AZ.

Repairing a windshield with a large crack is just too dangerous and not worth the risk. I actually rode my 650 around for several weeks sans windshield and enjoyed it (full face helmet). The helmet (Scorpion EXO 700) is actually quieter in full wind than with OEM windshield and turbulence over the top of it.
 

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^ Voice of experience. Probably worth listening to.

You won't ever achieve the original strength or toughness. When you consider possible outcomes, replacing the screen doesn't seem unrealistic.
 

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What I would do:

Determine shield material.
Remove shield from bike to relieve all mechanical stress from shield.
Apply suitable low viscosity solvent to crack (concave shape up) with a needle type applicator. It will be sucked in by capillary action.
Fabricate a form fitting mending bar(s) from copper, drill through bar and shield and use SS nuts & bolts to secure.
You can split open a copper water pipe, anneal it, pound it flat, cut and use to fabricate mending bars.
Mount shield on bike.
Research new replacement shield just in case.
 

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Certain glues cause 'crazing' on plastics, meaning, they may have a chemical reaction and spyder crack out of control. (This is from aviation)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sigh thanks.

Well, since I got this screen 6 years ago USED, it isn't tall enough for my liking, the vent has cracked and broken in 2 places, and it was meant for a standard and not an Exec so the masking didn't match up, it looks like I have enough justification to get a new windshield. I'm going to go with Givi since it's the tallest and cheapest, although I will miss the vent.

I wonder if I can repair the crack good enough for it to be cut down and used as another summer sport shield...
 

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Just stop drilling the crack may do it for you. I stop drilled a crack of about 1 1/2 inch in my Clearview around 2 years ago and it has shown no further inclination to crack.
 

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Do what I used to do for fixing cracks in structure on airplanes - put a doubler on it. A clear epoxy glue applied to the patch and placed over the affected area should do the trick. The new patch will carry the stress loads that the windshield can no longer carry.
 

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Do what I used to do for fixing cracks in structure on airplanes - put a doubler on it. A clear epoxy glue applied to the patch and placed over the affected area should do the trick. The new patch will carry the stress loads that the windshield can no longer carry.
^ That ^, until you can get another.
 

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Yea, get a new one. I am keeping the vent off my CleareView XXL and will use it on another one (prob an XL as they don't make the XXL and I'm glad they dont). The XXL is just a bit to tall and really takes a lot of stress.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Do what I used to do for fixing cracks in structure on airplanes - put a doubler on it. A clear epoxy glue applied to the patch and placed over the affected area should do the trick.

Not a bad idea. Only, perfectly matching the curvature would be a limiting factor for me.

I realize now how much I would like to have a different sized windshield, so my enthusiasm for repair isn't there. The only reason why I haven't ordered the Givi is obtaining congressional-like approval from the wife. Even though I worked my butt off on multiple side jobs this year to cover it.
 

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awww stick with the Clearview....much better screen IMNSHO and I've had both.
Sold the Givi right quick - adore the CV.

Look at the blems on CV...good deals.
 
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