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As a rule I have an emergency tire repair canister in both my car and the Burgman. I do not ride the Burgman without one. I also ride a road bike (bicycle) and you may know, cyclists always have a pump and a patch kit with them. Some ride with a Co2 cartridges. These cartridges (25g) can hold 850 Psi. They are used in soda stream and paintball guns. Unfortunately that 850 Psi is just pressure and not much air. On the road bike it will inflate a skinny tire to around 7 bar, which is enough (race road bikes can handle that type of pressure). However it will not inflate your car or motorcycle tire even enough to continue your trip. But about four 25g Co2 cartridges, I believe, will inflate your Burgman to around 40 Psi which is where you want it, more or less.

So I tried this and it works. I let my rear down to 30 Psi and then I inflated it with one 25g cartridge and pressure went up to 42 Psi, which means that 4 cartridges will be enough to go from flat to about 40 Psi. The canisters of tire goo will not inflate to 40 Psi and you always have to ride slowly to the nearest garage and inflate further. Well no more. Just fix the flat with the tire goo and inflate further with a few Co2 cartridges.

These two pictures show the applicator and a 25g cartridge. You can buy both from any bicycle shop. The copper side of the applicator goes on the valve and the cartridge into the other end. There is a sharp tip that will pierce through the protector on the cartridge. I had to use a short tube valve and cut the bottom tip of as it would be too long to go into the copper side. The reason why I inserted the valve is because there is nothing inside the applicator that will press against the tip in your Burgman valve to let air in, as these applicators are designed for Presta bicycle valves whilst your Burgman and car has a Shrader type valve . In the picture you can see the inserted valve. So then I proceeded to screw the copper side onto the bike valve with the turn knob tightly in closed position. I then screwed the cartridge into the other side and slowly, as I didn't know what to expect, and within about two seconds the cartridge emptied itself, and like I said, pushed the pressure from 30 to just over 40 Psi.

I am sure four of these 25g cartridges will go from completely flat to 40 Psi, because the Burgman's air capacity is not that big (based on one going from 30 to 40, so I think 1 cartridge for 0 to 10, another for 10 to 20, 20 to 30 and the fourth from 30 to 40 unless my understanding of air volume and pressure is wrong in that there could be a distinct difference between . 30 and 40 Psi and say 0 to 20 Psi). Your car tire might need 10 cartridges. I have not tried that but I think it will go that way. It's fuss less and I didn't even get my hands dirty.

Bottle Drinkware Tool Bottle cap Wood

Fluid Liquid Gas Tints and shades Automotive tire
 

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I travel with an Air “Pistachio” (name changed to protect the protected).

 

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@Kobus:

Good info, and always nice to read the results of someone's actually testing something.

BTW, although it's been more than half a century since I was in a physics class, I think you're correct about your proportional assumption of cartridge filling (given how I understand Gay-Lussac's law -- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay-Lussac%27s_law -- for instance).

Motorcycle.com had an article some time ago (I just dug it up, to refresh my memory), summarizing some kits with cartridges, as you recommend:


Ari Henning (of Revzilla, assorted print and, now, on-line moto mag fame, i.e., a very experienced guy) has some videos on making up a tool kit, and he talks about tire pluggers in those. In this one, from 10 months ago, he includes cartridges:


In this one, from six months ago -- geared more for longer trips -- he says that when he's "on a big trip" he carries an electric pump:


Me, I carry the Stop N Go plug stuff that he mentions in the first video above, along with a pump that he mentions in the second one. In fact, I have the combo kit that Stop & Go sells:


While the pics on that page are large, the physical size is remarkably compact. And I think we scooter riders are fortunate to have more storage than is found on many bikes, so I think there's almost always room for that sort of combo. But that's me.

One other thing anyone slogging through those videos may have noticed: Ari recommends some practice. And I've done that, and agree that it's a good idea: going back 20-something years now, I had the mushroom plugs* from Stop & Go for my bike at the time (and that early product included an inserter that was similar to and almost as large as a caulking gun). When I was about to get new car tires because they were close to going bald, I took a drill and a bit (I forget the size), and drilled a hole in a front tire (and was surprised at how quickly the car settled down). So, with the tire still on the car, I used the Stop & Go products to patch it, just to give me practice. I got to ride around in the car for a couple of weeks, until I had my appointment at a tire shop.

* (Note the word "plugs." What I did with mushroom products back in college, in the 60s, is another matter entirely.)
 

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one thing i do not hear mentioned, using a plug/sticky worm is physically DIFFICULT! If you do it while on black asphalt in florida summer full sunlight, you WILL use a badword, and require rehydration!
 

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I have the stop n go. EXCELLENT! saved me every single time. I will suggest u use some extra silicone grease with them and that you carry a small vise grip to hold the inner part while you turn cause you need a gorilla grip otherwise.

I dont want to run a compressor so I use a small manual hand pump for bicycles. will take me eons to fill the tire but its tiny and I carry enough extras under the seat for any repairs I might need. it does its job. takes a few minutes of pumping. easier then doing a bicycle tire though.
 

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I have carried a Stop & Go 1001 with CO2 canisters https://www.stopngo.com/productsb/7823
in all my bikes for approx. 25 yrs, I added 2 additional CO2 canisters (6 total) to handle bigger tires or JIC, add a small regular pliers and a small but good quality diagonal cutter.
I have never used plugs on my bikes, but helped/fixed up several others, very easy to use, just follow instructions. Even though I picked up a few nails, screws, staples, etc. I always managed the slow leak shooting a cartridge into tire and/or filling at gas stations with free air (Wawa) on the way home, I never pulled a nail/staple, just cut it flush with cutters.
Interestingly I had a flat on my car on Thursday/Turkey day/morning, after several failed attempts to get my tire fixed locally at different tire stores on Friday(story for another thread :rolleyes:), I fixed myself with my Stop & Go kit, driven close to 100 miles since, no issues, no air leaks/loss of pressure (y)
I finally got to use a plug on my own vehicle. I still have 9 of original 15 mushroom plugs left, I did have to replenish canisters over the years, about 2 dozen, I get them slightly cheaper on eBay+ free shipping.

Great investment (y):cool:
 

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On the gas laws and calculation -
The law would be the Ideal Gas Law, but it won’t work out exactly from a flat tyre.

The tyre changes volume when going from flat to inflated so one of your constants from the law isn’t constant. So most of your first cylinder or two changes the volume and does very little to the pressure, the later ones change the pressure but have less effect on volume.

I’m sure you aren’t far off but the maths is more complex, allow for a bit extra
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Thanks Bluebottle, I guess the only way to see if 4 cartridges will inflate to 40 is to let all air out and do a proper test. I do have a suspicion that the first cartridge and even the second one will not have the same effect as the one I used going from 30 to 40 Psi. Perhaps much more air is used to get to the point where a little more air has more effect compared to when the tire is flat. I guess the best scenario is that something like tire-weld will stop the leak and the cartridge or two is used to reach optimum pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So I did a bit of Google research. I found this and I quote:
"Most of these kits use disposable CO2 cartridges to inflate the tire once you've repaired the puncture. How much do you need? According to our tests, it takes six 12-gram canisters to inflate a 180/55-17 rear tire to 20 psi, while a similar number of 16-gram charges will get it to 23 psi"

So I think four 25g cartridges will inflate the tire to around 40Psi. However Carbon Dioxide is more dense than air which means that your tire will loose pressure quicker than if filled with air. With nitrogen it will maintain pressure better. The other aspect to remember is that if you are concerned about the environment then maybe just use air instead of carbon dioxide.
 

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One other thing to remember when using CO2 carts: CO2 can and does seep through the rubber of the tire within a day or so, even if all leaks have been repaired. So, the carts (I carry 6 in my kit, with the brass-tip plugs and tools and whatnot) will get you home or back to civilization, but bleed it out and refill with air as soon as practical.
 

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The other thing to remember is that roadside plug, rope, mushroom repairs are considered temporary “get you home” measures only and a proper repair should be made as soon as practical. This can only be done from the inside.

This is because you need to check for injury to the inside, if the location suitable for a repair and most importantly, to add an internal patch to stop air under pressure in the chamber from being forced into the tyre structure forcing the various layers apart, known as “delaminating”, and causing the tyre to fail.
Also to seal the cut edges between layer interfaces in the hole for the same reason.

DIY repair kits drop the speed rating of the tyre too, ratings are usually 40-65 mph max and up to 500 miles max.
 

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Has anyone ever tried puncture seal or similar in their tyres ?
If you are referring to products installed inside tire, like "Ride-On" balancer/sealer or just sealers like Goop, for life of tire on Burgman's, YES. Most temporary/emergency (AKA, Fix-A-Flat) spray can sealers, should be removed/cleaned from tire ASAP if tire is repairable, some have aggressive chemicals. A search on this site will show different opinions/results.
 

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Yes that’s the stuff.
I saw a demonstration at a bike show a few years ago where the guy stabbed a bradawl into the tyre and he hit it with a mallet a few times ( to simulate road contact) and spun it and the blue gunk seeped out of the hole and permanently sealed the puncture.
Apparently it’s used in our mail vans and aircraft tyres over here.
I have often thought about putting some in my tyres.
 
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