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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
This is my first post, after lurking on the site for about a month.

First off, I want to thank everyone for providing so much useful information on the Burgman(s)!

I am taking the MSF course at the end of August, and I’ve been considering picking up a Burgie 400. I have a question about how the 400 handles over rough pavement though. We have terrible roads here in SE Michigan, and I’m concerned about the stability of the B400 going over good sized bumps and potholes. The only scooter time I’ve had was on a Honda 70 scooter years ago. The thing I remember about the Honda was the disconcerting way my butt would lift off the seat, and the way my feet would jump on the floorboards while going over large bumps. I also remember how it was difficult it was to transfer my weight off the seat to the floorboards quickly, since my feet weren't centered under my body on foot pegs like a MC.

I know the Burgman is light years ahead of that old Honda, but every time I go over 3+ inch high mounds of buckled pavement in my car, I wonder how the Burgman would handle it?

I am looking at the Suzi DRZ-400S or the SV650 as well (but the Burgie seems much better suited to commuting to me). Is anyone who switched over from a MC bothered by the absence of a fuel tank to balance against?

Thanks,
BryanG
 

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Bryan,

Welcome to BurgmanUSA. I don't think those rough roads will cause any stability problems, but they do get irritating sometimes. I have the same issue where I live. There are some things you can do though. I did a long ride today with my new AirHawk seat cushion. It does absorb some of those sharp little bumps (like frost heave ridges and uneven cement slab portions of roadway).

I switched over from a motorcycle (actually from a long history of riding motorcycles). Maybe the first week or two you'll feel funny without the gas tank there. After that, you won't miss it. I actually think it is safer not having the gas tank and engine between your legs if you go down. Of course, we all try NOT to crash, but you have to acknowlege that it could happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info, Pauljo.

I've only sat on the B400 so far, and I liked the feeling of the center of mass of the bike being so low. I rocked side to side and it didn't seem too difficult to keep it upright (standing still) for a 400+ pound bike.

My only complaint was the leg room seemed a bit short for me, I will probably remove the backrest at some point...

So now I just have to find a used B400 for a good price in my area. :wink:

Thanks Again,
BryanG
 

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I have the 400S and I can't deny you will feel the lumps, speedbumps and potholes. But although it can be teeth-rattling, it does not unsettle the bike - and I'm only 129 pounds, so I don't really add much to the downforce. I've only been riding for about 4 weeks now - and I love the balance of the Burgman. From admittedly poor planning (on my part) I didn't realize a route I chose was undergoing major construction and a 5 minute trip took 20 minutes of stop and go, weaving and needle threading through chunks of asphalt on the road - and I think I had to put my feet down once during that time. Now my last ride was a bicycle - lol - so maybe I'm just used to unconsciously correcting for bumps and potholes and feeling the road doesn't bother me - but if there is an option in my lane of not going over a pothole, I just don't.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies.

Thanks for the info Patty, from what I've read on the forum, that seems to be the concensus - it can be a bumpy ride, but not an unstable one.

I assume Russ does not think it is an unsafe "buckboard", since he is not willing to give up his!

BryanG
 

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I'd much rather have gravel or washboard clay than sugar soft beach sand. That stuff is tricky. :? Nope but the burg will tip-toe down a gravel or clay rutted road OK but however don't expect to be safe at speeds over 15 or 30ish mph. If you're in the beach parking lot or on a beach frontage road you might as well get ready to "outrigger" your boots and slip between grab and no grab on the cvt - ie sloooow.

Or REALLY fast - depending on how you attack it. 8)
 

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I'd like to add that you alternative choices may not be the best.
The DRZ 400S is a good bike no doubt, but it is tall and has virtually no carrying capacity. The seat is rather skinny and sure to be uncomfortable in no time.

The SV650 while a great bike is a sport bike that has the requisite suspension and ergonomics and would not be too much fun on rough roads. The seats are notoriously flat and hard. You lose carrying capacity as well. One good point is that Givi hard luggage can be fitted no problem.

A better choice from my point of view is the V-Strom 650. An all around excellent bike that has comfortable ergonomics and can be fitted with either Suzuki or 3rd party hard cases. There is a ton of after market parts and accessories for the V-Strom as well as a couple of good forums.

However, all three leave you exposed to the elements and lack the comfort and carrying capacity of the Burgman. Being behind the body work and windshield as on a Burgman you can enjoy riding in far cooler temperatures and wetter weather than most exposed riders are willing to brave. Another big plus in my eyes is the fact that the Burgmans and other big scooters are very easy to keep clean. Most of the nasty little nooks and crannies are covered by the body work which makes clean up a snap! You'll always look good and spend more time riding while your budddies are scrubbing away in the garage or driveway. And finally let's not forget the BurgmanUSA store. You can show off how proud you are by wearing some very cool Burgman gear.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yep, both my other choices need upgrades. The DR seat is like a fence rail, the stock fuel tank is tiny and it has no carrying capacity - so I will have to add maybe 500 beans in aftermarket stuff to get it where the B400 is already.

The SV is a little better, but still not where the Burgie is a commuter/tourer - but ****, I love the looks of that bike! And yes, Ive read a lot of complaints about the seat too.

I never really looked into the V-Strom, it's seems a good option...tho it's not near as pretty as the SV.. and you make good points about all three choices VS the Burgman.

Thanks for the input.
BryanG
 

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I had a V-Strom (DL1000) along with the Burgman 650 for just over a year. Very good motorcycle, great engine. I think that in it's category (adventure touring) it looks at least as good as the competition. You can't legitimately compare an SUV to a sports car for looks...

I sold the V-Strom this year and kept the Burgman. But if I lived 3 miles from pavement, I'd probably have kept the Strom. I did have the factory hard luggage on mine.
 

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BryanG,

Using the technique (they will show you in MSF course) for riding over a bump (ie: 2x4) in the road (raising your butt off the seat a bit) you will find the bump more tolerable and far less like a bucking bronco. In fact, the same technique may even work on a bucking bronco! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the advice all, I think I've made my mind up and decided on the Burgman 400, in silver (used) if I can find one in my area.

I take my MSF course in the end of August, maybe I will be able to find one before the snow flies!
 

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Burgman 400 rider in Ann Arbor

Hi,

I took the safety course about two weeks ago and it's very much worth the extra cash. I learned so much that I just wouldn't have considered otherwise. We had many people who had never ridden a motorcycle in their lives and they asked so many questions that I probably wouldn't have asked. It was a great experience. I rode my 400 to the last class in Brighton and the entire Harley sales force and most of the service crew went out to have a look. They were impressed. That was pretty cool!

About the bumpiness of the ride...I only have about 150 miles on mine thus far but I've traveled those kinds of roads you speak of and the scoot seems to handle them well. I'm 175, 5'11" and I assume the suspension, (when they adjusted at the dealership for me) was the right thing to do because my 400 handles them fine. I use the technique they taight us in big bumps, but even when one comes along that I don't catch in time, I've never felt out of control.

I can see that I may do something with the back rest so that I have more leg room, but I am scared to mess things up.

I'm telling you, there hasn't been a day that's gone by that I haven't wanted to get on the scoot and go. It is a really thrilling and relaxing feeling. I love it.

When you get your 400, give me a holler and we'll go riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
mrm,
Thanks for the info, I'm really looking foward to my MSF course at the end of the month.

I'm 5' 11" too, and the leg room on the B400 is just a bit short for me as well.

And thanks for the kind offer, I'll probably spend a bit of time puttering around the hood before I will be up for any road trips :p I'll let you know.
 
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