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Hello everyone have a quick question here I just got my 2011 Burgman 650 executive about a month ago and I'm trying to put an auxiliary power distribution fuse box that I purchased for all my toys.
I would like to put it close to the battery I think I found a spot to put it
but I'm looking for the closest place I can find a hot wire after the ignition switch to hook it up
I also purchase an auxilary grounding block just to be safe
I would like to keep it out of the glove boxes and that area I think it'll fit just fine on top of the battery box under the seat
If anybody knows a better way to do this please let me know I'm open for all suggestions.... by the way it's at OLS 10 Way fuse box
Happy scooting
Bob:laugh
 

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Bob, you just need a trigger to activate a relay? Find one of the rear tail light wires and use a watertight tap. The taillights are turned off with the key. I do not know what color the wires are on a 2011, sorry.
 
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I put a smaller 5 fuse box in where the fuse panel is to the left of the glovebox. I ran a relay to switch the power to them switched by the feed to the power outlet.
 

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I used the heated seat fuse from the fuse box :)

Greg
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I connected a 40 amp circuit beaker and ran #8 copper wire from it and the battery neg up to under the front panel, landed them in a couple of big box lugs. Tap off to some smaller circuit breakers for the air horn, extra power plug in the glove box, ect. I have no power problems at all.
 

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And don't forget a main fuse if it's not close to battery like shown above.
 

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I have my Main Fuse (40 Amp Circuit Breaker) next to the battery + terminal. At the box lugs under the front panel, I can put relays, branch circuit breakers, fuse blocks, grounding blocks, whatever I want. It's the perfect set up.
 

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Hello everyone have a quick question here I just got my 2011 Burgman 650 executive about a month ago and I'm trying to put an auxiliary power distribution fuse box that I purchased for all my toys.
I would like to put it close to the battery I think I found a spot to put it
but I'm looking for the closest place I can find a hot wire after the ignition switch to hook it up
I also purchase an auxilary grounding block just to be safe
I would like to keep it out of the glove boxes and that area I think it'll fit just fine on top of the battery box under the seat
If anybody knows a better way to do this please let me know I'm open for all suggestions.... by the way it's at OLS 10 Way fuse box
Happy scooting
Bob:laugh
Location:

I can understand your desire to leave the dash-area cubbies intact, available for normal use. However, I think it's a mistake.

My suggestion, on any bike to which a fuse panel is being added, is to locate it in the vicinity of most of the action, such that the wire runs to the panel/block/whatever-you-call-it are short, minimizing: length; complexity; passing by heat; crossing the steering neck (not so much an issue on the Burger, with its frame-mounted fairing); and so forth.

I acquired a 2008 Exec last year, and recently added a fuse panel to it. I started a thread on this last month:

http://burgmanusa.com/forums/15-burgman-650/145897-switch-outlets-voltmeter-added-front-dash.html

For the panel, I now have power to five devices. Four of them are right in or about the dash, and the fifth are lights on the front calipers:

- Running-lights mod;
- Voltmeter
- Dash cigarette-lighter-style outlet
- Dash USB outlet
- Motolights

I envision adding another up-front device to be powered by the panel, a replacement horn.

On the rear of the bike, I have two additions: AdMore lighting in a Givi topcase, and a CustomLED break-light flasher (for the AdMore LED strip). Both of these are low-power, and receive that power from the existing tail/brake light circuits, so there was no need to involve a fuse panel.

Wire Gauge:

Certainly no harm in going heavier than required -- see @E.D.'s post -- but 10- or 12-gauge should do the trick.

If you Google something like 12 volt wire amp charts, you'll see all sorts of charts, from many diverse sources, that give minimum-size gauges for runs of so-many-amps for so-many-feet. Here are just a couple:

https://www.tessco.com/yts/industry/products/itm/automotive/get_wired.html
http://www.offroaders.com/technical/12-volt-wiring-tech-gauge-to-amps/

It would be highly unusual to go beyond 30 or 40 amps. The most important thing here is to make sure the hot side is fused just as it departs the battery.

The Run:

I have a series of pics (of my formerly owned 2007 Exec) that show the run from the battery, to the front, starting with this image/caption in my gallery:

http://www.billanddot.com/burgman/#9

Heavy wire, fused, and surrounded by a split-plastic sheath. I pulled essentially the same stunt with my 2008 Exec a month or so ago.

The Trigger:

On both bikes, I used hot side of the stock glovebox outlet for the trigger (for those circuits in a fuse panel that are to be hot only when the ignition's on). Nothing magic about that -- it was convenient, is all. Certainly, if the fuse panel is not up front for some reason, a tail-light hot wire is another good choice.
 
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Location:

I can understand your desire to leave the dash-area cubbies intact, available for normal use. However, I think it's a mistake.

My suggestion, on any bike to which a fuse panel is being added, is to locate it in the vicinity of most of the action, such that the wire runs to the panel/block/whatever-you-call-it are short, minimizing: length; complexity; passing by heat; crossing the steering neck (not so much an issue on the Burger, with its frame-mounted fairing); and so forth.

I acquired a 2008 Exec last year, and recently added a fuse panel to it. I started a thread on this last month:

http://burgmanusa.com/forums/15-burgman-650/145897-switch-outlets-voltmeter-added-front-dash.html

For the panel, I now have power to five devices. Four of them are right in or about the dash, and the fifth are lights on the front calipers:

- Running-lights mod;
- Voltmeter
- Dash cigarette-lighter-style outlet
- Dash USB outlet
- Motolights

I envision adding another up-front device to be powered by the panel, a replacement horn.

On the rear of the bike, I have two additions: AdMore lighting in a Givi topcase, and a CustomLED break-light flasher (for the AdMore LED strip). Both of these are low-power, and receive that power from the existing tail/brake light circuits, so there was no need to involve a fuse panel.

Wire Gauge:

Certainly no harm in going heavier than required -- see @E.D. 's post -- but 10- or 12-gauge should do the trick.

If you Google something like 12 volt wire amp charts, you'll see all sorts of charts, from many diverse sources, that give minimum-size gauges for runs of so-many-amps for so-many-feet. Here are just a couple:

https://www.tessco.com/yts/industry/products/itm/automotive/get_wired.html
http://www.offroaders.com/technical/12-volt-wiring-tech-gauge-to-amps/

It would be highly unusual to go beyond 30 or 40 amps. The most important thing here is to make sure the hot side is fused just as it departs the battery.

The Run:

I have a series of pics (of my formerly owned 2007 Exec) that show the run from the battery, to the front, starting with this image/caption in my gallery:

http://www.billanddot.com/burgman/#9

Heavy wire, fused, and surrounded by a split-plastic sheath. I pulled essentially the same stunt with my 2008 Exec a month or so ago.

The Trigger:

On both bikes, I used hot side of the stock glovebox outlet for the trigger (for those circuits in a fuse panel that are to be hot only when the ignition's on). Nothing magic about that -- it was convenient, is all. Certainly, if the fuse panel is not up front for some reason, a tail-light hot wire is another good choice.
Back in 1973, my Drill Sergeant told us KISS
Keep It Simple $hithead
 

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Back in 1973, my Drill Sergeant told us KISS
Keep It Simple $hithead
Yep. Basic Training for me was 1968 (Ft. Dix, NJ).
 

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Yep. Basic Training for me was 1968 (Ft. Dix, NJ).
Yep, Basic Training for me was 1966 Fort Benning, Ga.

wspollack: About the Wire Size, I recommend going by the wire sizes as specified by the USA's National National Electrical Code. I am a career master electrician and electrical engineer, and these standards provide the greatest margin of safety. These standards are for Building Construction, but should apply equally as well to automotive and motorcycle use. I chose the #8 copper wire because it is being fed with a 40 amp circuit breaker. #10 may work, but the #8 will run cooler and give less voltage drop.
Typical amp rating guidelines for copper wire per N.E.C. in general:
#14 copper = 15 amps
#12 copper = 20 amps
#10 copper = 30 amps
#8 copper = 40 amps
But you can use whatever you want, it's your bike.
I decided to use a 40 amp automatic circuit so that I would not ever have to worry about having enough power again. The circuit breaker is a common generic part at most auto parts stores Problem solved!
I put the automatic 40 map circuit breaker very close to the battery under the seat, then the #8 RED +, and the #8 BLACK -, Standard THWN Building Wire from a Building Supply Store, run under the footboard cover next to the engine on the left side, and then the wires come up into the space under the front panel. They are securely tie wrapped along the way to keep them secure and out of the way of the steering. There is plenty of space under the Front Panel for all kinds of stuff, terminal blocks, relays, fuse blocks, Stebel Air Horn, whatever. And this space is easily accessable, more than you might think, it you haven't pulled that cover off before. To remove the front panel cover, it's just 3 screws on each side, a couple in the middle under the meter panel and one on each side at the rear (10 screws), and give it a GOOD yank to the rear and off it comes. Lots of space under there. You can feed all your power stuff from there. I think it is an excellent location for the power center on the 650.
Hope this helps.
Cheers!
 

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I may have skimmed over it but if placing a fusebox under the seat is where you want it I believe the wire for the license plate lamp runs under the battery pan across the top of the fuel tank just in fron of the trunk box if memory serves. Haven't done any additions in that area for awhile so take it with a grain of sand, or salt, or whichever condiment of choice you prefer ;).
 

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I may have skimmed over it but if placing a fusebox under the seat is where you want it I believe the wire for the license plate lamp runs under the battery pan across the top of the fuel tank just in fron of the trunk box if memory serves. Haven't done any additions in that area for awhile so take it with a grain of sand, or salt, or whichever condiment of choice you prefer ;).


All the wires for the rear run up the tube behind the under seat fuses.
 

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FWIW, I used wire sizes based on a fuse panel capable of a total simultaneous load of 30 amps. This is a common max output for many fuse panels, and is therefore also a common value for the fuse itself on the hot side power to the panel.

For instance, a long-time popular and oft-used panel -- at least from my reading of assorted motorcycle forums for about 20 years now -- is the FZ-1 from Fuzeblocks. That can handle a total of 30 amps; see http://www.fuzeblocks.com/

Another popular device is the PC-8 from Eastern Beaver; see http://easternbeaver.com/Main/Wiring_Kits/Fuseboxes/PC-8/pc-8.html . This, too, has a total max of 30 amps, and is the device I added to my '08 Exec. Eastern Beaver optionally supplies battery-connection looms for the PC-8, for which it uses 12 AWG.

On my other bike, a Victory bagger, I use Powerlet's Termin-8; see http://www.powerlet.com/product/termin8-easier-than-fuseblock/409 . This is basically a battery-terminal extender, fused, for neatly adding four more connections. Powerlet uses 12-gauge wire to construct the Termin-8, which it states is rated at 30 amps.

Last, if you look at the stock wires used by bike manufacturers, they tend not to get extravagant. For instance, I believe the glovebox outlet on the 650 is fused at 10 amp, and the wires going into it are pretty small, maybe 18 or even 20 gauge. Similarly, on my Victory a dash outlet is fused at 20 amps, and uses similarly sized wire.

The NEC standards that I looked at seem to deal with "0 - 2000 volts." On the automotive or bike side of the world, using 12 - 16 V, I think smaller gauges will be fine ... although, as I stated earlier in the thread, there's certainly no harm in going with fatter wires.

So, based on a typical upper limit of 30 amps, a run of no more than, say, five feet, what actual bike manufacturers use, what well-established aftermarket vendors use (and they certainly don't want to face product-liability issues), I feel very comfortable in using 10- or even 12-gauge supply lines to a fuse panel. That's me, just sharing some additional information, particularly about what professional bike power-supply vendors use.
 
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