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Discussion Starter #1
According the reviews of many long time rider's ala (iron butt) (touring associations)and middle aged folks etc etc...The perfect speed on "ANY' motorbike for long distance interstate cruising is 65 mph.

This is what i do also, and find the bike extremely economical and happy.
 

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The 400 loves it

My 400 loves doing 65 - 70 indicated. That seems to be the sweet spot that smooths everything out and feels like you could ride that way all day. I'm not a long time rider but I started in middle age, so I suppose that kinda counts.

Unfortunately, on the I-10 west of Phoenix, that speed leaves you sandwiched in with the semis. For anyone travelling at speeds less than 80MPH, the maximum one car-length following distance is strictly enforced by other motorists. The ones behind you tailgate and the ones in adjacent lanes move into any following distance you have established between you and the vehicle in front of you. At such times I tend to say heck with it, twist the throttle and get around the pack. Fortunately that's something the 400 is usually quite capable of.
 

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Mostly I avoid Interstates and stick to the 2 lanes. Only time I will hit the Interstate is on a long trip if I just need to get there as soon as possible.

How fast I run depends on which bike I am on and which interstate. In Texas some of the Interstates have 75 mph speed limits and out in west Texas some are 80 mph.

If I am on the 400 I stick to about 65 as that seems to be it's sweet spot. That is unless I am on one of the faster speed limit roads then I kick it up to 70 or more if traffic is heavy.

On the 650 I just run what ever the speed limit is. It cruses at 80 as well as it does 65 or 70.
 

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I haven't done much interstate riding. When I do I keep it at 70 (75+ indicated). I don't mind the cars passing me, but I don't feel comfortable with the semi's passing me. At 70, I stay ahead of most of the trucks.

John
 

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I have the tall 185/60 HR 14 Car tire on and at 72-73 MPH indacated I am doing about 74-75 MPH and keeping up with traffic in a 60 MPH zone. I would have no problem setting my speedo at 110 MPH for hours if I could. 65 MPH is just over a mile a minuet and 90 is a mile and a half in that same minuet. Humm, go 130 miles in two hours or 220 miles in two hours and save 1 hour 20 minuets..... I still get about 45 MPG at 110 MPH and 51 MPG at 65.
 

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For me...62/63 MPH=6000 RPM is my 'comfort level'.
You wanna go faster...go ahead & go right around.
 

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I, um, ride faster.

I don't like cars passing me. It's too passive hoping that cars will just see me and drive around. I don't like hoping cagers are not distracted, drunk, texting or otherwise incapacitated from doing their primary function at the moment. I ride as if I'm invisible. I have trained myself to be comfortable at any speed the bike is capable of attaining, so I can accomplish this.

I'm NOT saying I recklessly speed or anything, just that I have the capacity to ride comfortably at any speed the situation dictates to keep myself safe and out of the way of pending danger. I like riding in the "holes" between traffic buildups on the highway when possible.

I see them. I pass them. It's my decision, not theirs.

I think one does a disservice to themselves when not using, or at least having, every tool that is available. Speed and maneuverability are prime advantages of riding a bike. Why not use them in a safe and responsible manner when necessary?
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
That's very well said Liamjs. I suppose I was speaking of myself out here on the open Plaines where a man can cruise quite comfortably in his own pace without too much harassment. That being said ,I do understand what it's like riding in a bigger city, you always get pushed off the road, honked at and birded it if you don't run 80mph.

I cruise at 65 but I sometimes run up to 90 as maneuverability requires.

Back to my original topic: the big boy riders say that 65 mile-per-hour and 12 hours is less tiring than 80 mph and 10 hours... Canyon carvers fall short of cruisers on touring runs due to speed exhaustion.
 

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I cruise at 65 but I sometimes run up to 90 as maneuverability requires.
I love cruising at 65 also, when given the chance.

I do agree that 65 is a huge sweet spot for both Burgmans. They just purr at that speed. Very little wind, even with the stock screens. Just a slight little hum from the engine. Life is good when one can do that.

Off topic...

I told my wife once that the Burgmans have such good wind protection, I can smell my farts at 60 mph. Lol. That's quite an accomplishment for a MC. :D
 

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Back to my original topic: the big boy riders say that 65 mile-per-hour and 12 hours is less tiring than 80 mph and 10 hours... Canyon carvers fall short of cruisers on touring runs due to speed exhaustion.
You know, I haven't tested it, but I can see where that is true. Higher speeds translates to more punishment on the body from wind buffeting, bumpier riding and such. Over an extended period, it could prove more tiring than a longer ride. Save maybe the rear end.
 

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Although I ride a Swing now, I too ride at 65....smoooooth
 

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<<<SNIP>>>
Back to my original topic: the big boy riders say that 65 mile-per-hour and 12 hours is less tiring than 80 mph and 10 hours... Canyon carvers fall short of cruisers on touring runs due to speed exhaustion.
IMHO, I have found that it is just the opposite.

I have ridden Harleys for many 1,000's of miles in my early biking life. I rode a 1968 1200 Shovel Head from Portland OR to Panama City, Panama for a Marine Captain friend of my family. It was loud, clunky and I was very tired after a days ride of 300 to 400 miles. On that trip my very top sustained speed was about 65 MPH. Took 11 days. Ate a lot of chicken and fish tacos. :D Stiff suspension and Loud pipes kill endurance/stamina.

I have done many runs at speeds of 75-100 MPH for hours on a sport bike with the only breaks being for gas and food. I could do 1200 to 1500 miles a day, stop for the evening and drink beer to 11PM and start again at 6 AM. I was a Drill Instructor and 4-5 times a year I was given a week or two off in between training cycles so I would go from Georgia to Washington St and back on my Suzuki GS750.
 

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Dave J, isn't that a bit of comparing apples to oranges?

A '68 Shovel Head really is no comparison to any modern bike at any speed. You would need to compare the exact same bike at both 65 mph and at a higher speed to get a true comparison.

Just sayin'...
 

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Dave J, isn't that a bit of comparing apples to oranges?

A '68 Shovel Head really is no comparison to any modern bike at any speed. You would need to compare the exact same bike at both 65 mph and at a higher speed to get a true comparison.

Just sayin'...
Chappy said the Big Boy riders, I take that as Harley riders and Canyon Carvers I take as sport bikers......

One group of low and slow vs a group of purched up with your knees behind your arm pits.

Oh, IMHO a 68 1200 is not too far removed from the 2000 EVO and up. Still 1930's Tractor tech.
 

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Chappy said the Big Boy riders, I take that as Harley riders and Canyon Carvers I take as sport bikers......
Even a modern Harley has little to do with a '68 model.

I took Big Boy to mean modern GWs, BMWs and other large touring bikes. Harley's are no longer the only big engined bikes. Triumph has a 2300cc model. My car only has a 2.2L engine.
 

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If I go over 65 mph, oil starts to burn. I was cruising at 70 to 75 towards Mount Baker in a country road where the speed limit was 70 and when I got back home and check the oil level it was pretty low so I try not to go over 65 mph. I use fully synthetic oil with lube guard engine oil protectant and it's still burned oil. I can't imagine how much more oil it would've consumed if I did not use the best oil and oil additives. The thought of a seized engine at only 11,000 miles on the interstate does not appeal to me.
 

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If I go over 65 mph, oil starts to burn. I was cruising at 70 to 75 towards Mount Baker in a country road where the speed limit was 70 and when I got back home and check the oil level it was pretty low so I try not to go over 65 mph. I use fully synthetic oil with lube guard engine oil protectant and it's still burned oil. I can't imagine how much more oil it would've consumed if I did not use the best oil and oil additives. The thought of a seized engine at only 11,000 miles on the interstate does not appeal to me.
Because of the reason the early model 400s use oil at higher rpms I don't think it really matters whether you are using the most expensive super duper high tech oil or just standard grade oil. They don't use oil for the normal reasons engines burn oil. They suck it up through the crankcase breather system into the air filter housing. Your "fully synthetic oil with lube guard engine oil protectant" is not going to stop that.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
All great replies...Sorry men i wasen't very clear with my statement...'Big boy', i mean't big tourer's goldwing's etc...It seems to be the consensus that a steady 65 mph down the interstate (a bit like granny in town from stop light to stop light who passes you every 30 seconds going a consistant speed) is a more relaxed mile eater than a sport bike going 80-90mph...

The human behind it gets tired quicker, as the brain has to process danger at a much higher speed...They push this at all motorcycle school's and classes and even road test's.

If you go 85mph for a 100 miles and stop for a quick break and readjust the brain to atmostpheric pressure, a 65 mph rider could pass you when you are shattered and bug eyed, and he's still cruising for another 200 miles.

Dave is probably an exception to the rules of average, being a drill instructor i'd imagine he was very fit and hard bodied, most of us arent like that! ha ha
 

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I guess I am one of those that would rather take a 12 hour ride on a 45 mph hour road than 6 hours on a 90 mph one. No so 40-45 years ago when whatever the speed limit was I doubled it if I could. Geeeeeeeeze. How did I live though those times? Still got some old road rash scars and never to go away screws in some bones but now- ah, now! The pleasures of riding somewhere just for the riding. Getting home with you and your bike looking (except a bit more dirty) just like it did when you left.

You guys that want to drive fast, well, may God watch out for you as well as he did and is still doing for me. But if I am riding with someone that wants to hot dog and ride everywhere well over the limit I just tell them to go on ahead and I will catch up to them later.

And if later comes, fine. If not, fine. I'm taking my own sweet time now and by jingo, I deserve it.

The roses are a lot easier to smell at 30 mph than they are at 90.
 
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