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Discussion Starter #1
Here is a follow up video that gives much more detail on trauma first aide.
Shawn is a great friend to have and ride with!

http://youtu.be/T5zD3LVX6J8
 

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There is some good information here. What I came away with was this: I am totally not qualified or trained to do much as a first responder. It punctuated the need for me to take a course for first responder first aid or self aid.

Good job and thanks for the video and Scootereno for posting it.
 

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Army Medic has his act together in a serious way. This is a guy I would be glad to have at my side at any trauma scene or even in the trauma room at the ER. Guys, this stuff is the "right stuff." Pay attention, you can learn stuff from Army Medic.

Namaste'
Doug from Kentucky
 

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Being a Combat Lifesaver, I am no where near being a Medic. But I am someone you would like to have around you when all he11 hits the fan. Those are very good Vids with loads of well thought out info.

Something as simple as on a hot summer ride and a rider goes down, do you move the rider? If the rider is laying on hot pavement, you had better isolate the rider from the blistering heat or the burns will compound things. Pavement can be over 150 Degrees on a hot summer day. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7486363
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great tip Dave! Thanks. ;)
It's those things you never think about until after the fact.
 

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we should compile the list of things he recommends in the video.
 

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Being a Combat Lifesaver, I am no where near being a Medic. But I am someone you would like to have around you when all he11 hits the fan. Those are very good Vids with loads of well thought out info.

Something as simple as on a hot summer ride and a rider goes down, do you move the rider? If the rider is laying on hot pavement, you had better isolate the rider from the blistering heat or the burns will compound things. Pavement can be over 150 Degrees on a hot summer day. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7486363
This is one of the reasons I wear my mesh jacket when the weather gets hot here. I don't want to compound any injuries I might have with burns received from the pavement if I am in an accident. As an experiment this summer when it gets hot and you are tempted to ride in shirt sleeves, go out and touch the pavement before you decide to ride without your jacket. As hot as things are, you will find that you don't want to have your skin in contact with that hot pavement.

Namaste'
Doug from Kentucky
 

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And you're in Kentucky, Doug. Imagine what it's like here in Florida! :blob6:
 

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Even in the great NorthWet, the pavement gets hot in the summer.
 

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And you're in Kentucky, Doug. Imagine what it's like here in Florida! :blob6:
I lived for a year in Yuma Arizona when I was in my early 20's. During the summer there, the pavement is so hot that our jets (I was in the USMC, in aviation) couldn't get enough lift to get off of the runways in the afternoons. And that was even with the runways watered down to cool them so the jets could get a little more lift. To work on the jets during the day, we had to bring them into the air conditioned hanger and give them 1 hour before anyone touched them with bare hands. Hot, HOT, HOT!

So, no thanks to southern Florida. I will just stay here in Kentucky where it is only 104 degrees with 100% humidity during the Dog Days of summer.

Namaste'
Doug from Kentucky
 

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The difference between "up north" and "down south" is that down here it doesn't actually cool off at night. Once the summer gets here, we''ll go six or eight or ten weeks when the temp doesn't drop below 70 even in that hour before dawn - and often it'll be in the mid-upper 80s at that point. Add the 100% humidity to that and it feels like every time you step out the door you're being hit in the face by a warm wet towel.

And it's like that most of the time from late April until early November.
 
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