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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Figured out the photo uploading. More comments tomorrow and look forward to tips and hints from the forum :)

Balance stand.

Stick on wheel weights

Pulling the rear wheel down so I can change the front tire

Tire irons and mounting stand (plastic barrel) which worked much better on 17 inch wheels than the Burgman's 13 inchers
 

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I have the smaller bead breaker and irons like yours, however I use a lenght of 1/2-13 threaded rod to bolt the wheel down on my work bench. An old front axle clamped plumb in a bench vise is used to static balance the front wheel (stick on weights).

The pre '07 400 rear wheel is cantilever mounted with 3 lugs and has a large center hole; so I bring it to Tire Kingdom for dynamic balancing--they have never charged me!
 

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Balancing is easy. I've been doing it for years at home. Get some double backed tape on weights for balancing. Put your wheel/tire assembly with the axle suspended on a pair of jack stands. Turn the wheel/tire gently and let it turn until it stops. The heaviest part will be at the bottom. Mark the lightest side (top) and turn it so you can stick a small weight at that point on the wheel - don't glue it on permanently yet. Turn gently and let it settle again - adding another weight at the top - this should be the same place as the first weight - if it isn't split the difference and place both weights at the difference point. When it is balanced perfectly the wheel/tire will settle at random points when spun. Put the weights on permanently and you're set. I've always gotten good results doing it this way. Better than cycle shops - which use the same method but are less than patient - often with mixed results.
 

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I mounted my Michelin city grips and did not balance them, they run smooth as glass. :) I am Happy Happy Happy!
 

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Better than cycle shops - which use the same method but are less than patient - often with mixed results.
That's the best part of DIY anything, knowing it was done correctly--and if it wasn't then only you are to blame; just learn from that and do it again. No big deal...

A fellow I knew years ago, who had owned and run a speed shop for over 40 years, once told me that "Paying someone else to 'soup up' your car and then going around bragging about how fast it is, is the same thing as paying someone else to do your girl and then going around bragging about how good she is."
 

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I used beads, 2oz in rear...1oz in front...Bung tire in a 5 inch vice with wooden blocks to break bead.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks Gang! Great comments and advice for the DIY crowd.

I used to change my own tires at the race track when needed, thus the accumulation of tools. I didn't think they'd be used again for scooter/motorcycle tires since I retired from the track in 2004.

I usually hear that the static balance method isn't as good as the computer machine. My only comment is this is how the road race tire vendors balance the tires for the pros. Me, I always mounted and balanced my own tires for the beginning of the year race at Daytona. Four years running and no balance issues :)
 

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I have a No-Mar manual tire changer and static balancer that I've used for years. It works perfectly, even on smaller scooter wheels. The No-Mar changers require a little knowledge of the proper technique, but once you learn how (they have website videos), it's very easy to do. I buy stick on weights and a box will last me several years, even changing tires for my buddies.

I recommend these is anyone is interested. Here's a link to their website:
http://www.nomartirechanger.com/Default.asp
 

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I have been changing tires on my bikes since 1970.
Kudos to all of you that DIY too!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Rear Tire Balance

I went down a dead end the first go around on using my balance stand with the rear Burgman tire. After a little more thought I starting checking the O.D. of PVC pipe and found that a 1 1/2 inch Schedule 40 pipe is 1.9 inches and the Burgman rear wheel is a little more than 2 inches. I made the difference up with electrical tape :p

Here's a few pics of how I made it work. It might not be as perfect as the front wheel with axle but it's pretty close and the cut end caps snug the wheel up tight on the PVC pipe. Like others have mentioned the rear wheel is not balance from the factory (at least mine didn't have any weights).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Bag O beads would be easier me thinks.
Maybe? I'm old school on the balance. I like static balance because it uses gravity which never needs re-calibrating :p

Plus, this was cheaper out of pocket than the beads which also need the filtered valve cores if I read the website correctly. My only real cost was labor which was my own and I work cheap for myself :D Also, we don't watch cable TV anymore so the "extra" time on my hands goes into little projects like this.
 

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My experience with Dynabeads is that they do work, but only if one is the sort that is not too picky about tire balance.

With them, once the tire and beads have reached their critical rpm, the nastiest imbalances will be dealt with; however you will not get that silky smooth ride that is possible with "real" balancing. I find this to be especially true at highway speeds where wind buffeting and the road surface mask the poor balance--at such speeds the difference between beads and proper balancing is quite noticeable.

I have also found that after 10 to 12k miles some beads will disintegrate and turn to a fine powder that no longer behaves as do the intact beads, negatively impacting the dynamic balancing process. More miles makes this worse. Dismount a "beaded" tire with 15k on it and you can see this.

As to which is "easier" it is of course using the beads. However proper balancing is not that arduous a task and generally in life the "easiest" way of doing anything is often not the best way...
 

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I am new to the forum but I have many years in motorcycling. I made a small pair of devices many years ago from 4 roller blade bearings and some aluminium angle...(yes I am in the uk and its pronounced aluminium here). Anyway it balances any size motorcycle wheel easily and quickly by placing the wheel and spindle on it on some axle stands and spinning the wheel a little and then letting it stop by itself so the heaviest part settles at the bottom, the top is them marked with a marker pen and a little weight is added and spun again...if it then stops in the same position a little more weight is added until it stops in any random place. If it then stops all the time with the weights at the very bottom you have added too much weight, so remove a little...easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I am new to the forum but I have many years in motorcycling. I made a small pair of devices many years ago from 4 roller blade bearings and some aluminium angle...(yes I am in the uk and its pronounced aluminium here). Anyway it balances any size motorcycle wheel easily and quickly by placing the wheel and spindle on it on some axle stands and spinning the wheel a little and then letting it stop by itself so the heaviest part settles at the bottom, the top is them marked with a marker pen and a little weight is added and spun again...if it then stops in the same position a little more weight is added until it stops in any random place. If it then stops all the time with the weights at the very bottom you have added too much weight, so remove a little...easy.
Hey JoeBoy! Welcome to the forum.

The roller blades turned into a balance stand is a great idea! I understand how it works on the front wheel using the spindle (axle) but what are you doing for the rear wheel? The rear is the one that gave me problems because it has no bearing (in the wheel) or removable spindle (axle).
 

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Do not know how the pre '07 rear wheel is attached.

I just did a car tire installation (after removal of OEM tire of course) on the after '07 model (a 2011) and have a complete post on the effort (pictures) under After 2007 link.

I had a lot of problems doing it, mostly due to my inexperience (not knowing how hard to pull on the hand tools). Then thee is the usual difficulties with a Car Tire (getting iit on the rim and to bead up).

I am using a Tire Changing Stand that I bought ( I think it was a little over $110 - better than the oens at Harbor Freight) at a so called Discount Tool Place here in Sevierville, TN (near knife works on Hwy 66 in case you are local). I mounted that stand to Plywood (4x8 cut to 4x4) and stacked (left room for the bolts to recede in the bottom piece to attach to the top piece, so I can drag it around and store it out of the way (not drill holes in the concrete).

As far a s balancing -- In the past I just set my NINJA and Burgman 650 on center stand and used axle as pivot.

Cannot do that on the Burgman 400 Wheel (after 2007) as the Hub has spline gears inside and the Axle does also. Ended up having a friend balance it on his Spin Balance Machine. Very little weigh required.
 

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Hey JoeBoy! Welcome to the forum.

The roller blades turned into a balance stand is a great idea! I understand how it works on the front wheel using the spindle (axle) but what are you doing for the rear wheel? The rear is the one that gave me problems because it has no bearing (in the wheel) or removable spindle (axle).
Yeah you have me on the back wheel one...I would have to find a bit of bar the right size or wrap some tape over a slightly smaller one so it fits snug in the center and try that.
 
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