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hi my thoughts on this would be to get something smaller that is very light and ride it as much as you want . there is no need in getting something that you might have trouble with later . i myself besides having my 650 burger also have 3 -1982 honda passports and a whizzer and enjoy riding them around town as much as the burger . just get something that your enjoy and ride .
 

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To my way of thinking the question is- "do you want to exist longer or do you want to LIVE longer"? If you don't do things that make you happy what's the point in prolonging your existance? The docotrs just have to cover their collective asses in our litiginous society so of course they are discouraging you. To hell with them all. Do what makes you happy. Just my $.02 worth (Canadian)
 

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I am inclined to go along with the first two posts but first I have to ask myself who else gets hurt if I go down ?
If I had no responsibility to family and If I wanted it enough then I guess I would.
On the other hand maybe a compromise, a Burgman three wheeler to keep everyone happy :wink:
 

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Never had one but as I get closer to 70 I think about them more & more (wonder why) . :?
I understand from reading and talking to a few owners that once you get the "hang" of riding them there a lot of fun and far more stable then I would have thought . :D
 

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Randy said:
Never had one but as I get closer to 70 I think about them more & more (wonder why) . :?
I understand from reading and talking to a few owners that once you get the "hang" of riding them there a lot of fun and far more stable then I would have thought . :D
Trikes are every bit as dangerous as two wheels. Same road hazards, traffic, and dumb crivers. Fast and even moderate turns are problematic on trikes, and you might make the argument that bikes are better and safer in turns.
 

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Any Transplant Recipients? Opinions wanted...

I think you are really asking two questions- first, whether to ride at all, and second, what possible complications would there be in the event of an accident.
I've chosen to ride, and as a two knee replacement man, I sought medical advice. The answer I got was that repairing an existing repair probably wouldn't be any worse than reconstructing "new" damage. I also have spinal stenosis (bone spurs, etc. pressing on the spinal cord) which is actually improved temporarily after a ride.
While bungee jumping and alligator wrestling are probably bad ideas, a "siege" mentality is infinately worse. Go for it...
 

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Just joined and I have a similiar problem. Had 2 hip replacements, cervical fusion of a couple of discs in my neck and lower back surgery, all in the last 10 years. Have not rode seriously in about 15 years. My wife got a Virago the first of the year and was disappointed that I had some difficulity riding her bike. She wants me to ride with her. Tried different bikes and biggest problem is throwing my leg over and handling weight over about 400 lbs.Went to the Suzuki dealer about 2 weeks ago and talked about my physical problem. He showed me the Burg 400 and I was impressed and it felt like it fit me. :lol: I know my doctors would have a cat if they knew,but I am going to ride again.
 

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Trikes are every bit as dangerous as two wheels. Same road hazards, traffic, and dumb crivers. Fast and even moderate turns are problematic on trikes, and you might make the argument that bikes are better and safer in turns.
All of what you say is true. But that's not the point. What do you do if you love to ride except holding a bike up not only becomes hard but also pain full. . So long as I am not a danger to anyone I want to ride. :)
 

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Hi there,

I can't speak as a transplant recipient but can as a kidney cancer survivor, with only one kidney and adrenal gland. I had similar fears when considering the bike. But Lynn put things in perspective for me: she lost a beautiful, healthy 17-year-old neice in a freak one-car accident 15 years ago on a sunny day. She was only 3 doors from her home. So things happen. In contrast, think of the older (more experienced!) riders we have among us--they've been riding for decades without a problem, many of them.

So I do ride, I take all the precautions I can, don't ride if I feel too tired, but I do ride. It's added so much to my life, including great stress reduction, in the month we've had our 400.

Hope this helps...

Bryna
 

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Wow. Some of you have been through a lot. At 56 (almost 57), my body doesn't work as well as it did as few years ago, and I do have some arthritis, but that is minor compared to the issues some of you are dealing with.

I'll say this though. If you took away my motorcycle and scooter, and parked me in front of a TV set, I'd age very quickly. Riding always makes me feel younger. And I think everyone needs something in their life that is truly exciting and exhilarating. Riding is that for me.

There is an old motorcyclist saying: "Ride to Live, Live to Ride". I wish you all many more happy miles, whether it is on two wheels or three.
 

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My Friend Jim is 83. Every morning he gets up before sunup, makes a cup of coffee, and, at first light, rides out on his BMW F650.

He rides, with noticeable grace and smoothness, through the hills to Tombstone, stops alongside the park, takes out a cigar and smokes it for ten minutes, then rides back home to his ranch on the Mexican border. It's a 65 mile round trip.

My sense of it is that he believes that as long as he can do that, he's not old.

A few years ago, riding through a dried-out creek bed (same bike) he got his foot caught in a deep crack in the mud and broke his ankle. As soon as he got the cast off he got right back on the F650 and began riding.

He's my role model.
 

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Randy said:
Trikes are every bit as dangerous as two wheels. Same road hazards, traffic, and dumb crivers. Fast and even moderate turns are problematic on trikes, and you might make the argument that bikes are better and safer in turns.
All of what you say is true. But that's not the point. What do you do if you love to ride except holding a bike up not only becomes hard but also pain full. . So long as I am not a danger to anyone I want to ride. :)

I have considered holding up a bike being painfull and if it gets to be a problem, thought about adding a Voyager kit. I know they make them for Silverwings not sure about Burgmans. Only concern with the kit is having to back the bike up. Most of my problems have been peg location on most bikes, not able to ride for more than hour without getting off and walking around. I'm 6ft. and the 400 still felt alright. Wished someone nearby had one to ride for awhile.
 

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live life to the fullest but be careful

I'm a nurse. I don't work on the clinical side anymore, but I did critical care nursing for over 7 years.

I've seen both types of people: Those who are incredibly health conscious and careful, but get sick/hurt anyway; and those who really don't care and are even reckless at times.

I think somewhere in the middle is where someone should live. Noone should tell you, Stormsteed, what to do.

Do a careful examination of what "value" riding a bike will add to your life - fantastically fun enjoyment and great transportation.

Consider who (besides yourself) will deal with the consequences of a bad wreck, and remember that many things are worse than death - paralysis, etc.

And lastly, make a decision and don't give a **** what others think about the decision - that includes if you decide to not ride a bike. There are many other ways to add fun to life besides riding a bike, many much safer. But in the end, it's entirely your decision.

Just my opinion. Scares me when I sound so much like my 83 year old father - who, by the way, does not care for the fact that I ride a bike when I have a wife and 3 kids under age 5 at home! Yet he doesn't push me on it and I don't really give a **** if he did.

Flint
 

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I know how hard it can be just stewing about options. I do this waaay too much myself :wink:

There is no concrete "Answer" in the Western culture sense of the word for a question with so many ambiguities. Listen to some great music, or absorb whatever art form moves you. Humanity and perspective can be found in the arts :idea:

Stop thinking about the answer directly & overtly & rationally, you have done enough of that already. It’s time to let the answer come to you :thumbup:
 

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Add me to the list of those who continue to ride regardless of physical setbacks. Cervical disc removed and bone fusion 2 years ago. Knee joint replaced 14 months ago. Lumbar lamenectomy of 2 vertabrae 5 months ago. Still riding and will be 76 in October.

Sure, I have aches and pains and stiffness but what is the alternative? Sit in a chair and read or watch TV for whatever years I have remaining? I have been too active and done too many things to accept the sedentary lifestyle now. I enjoy life too much to sit and think about what I might have done, but didn't.
 

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donwas said:
I enjoy life too much to sit and think about what I might have done, but didn't.
You are a smart man :)
 
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