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Ralph, I had a somewhat similar timeline. Around 3,000 miles I started getting some shudder. So I started researching, gathering tools, etc, to prepare to clean out the whole transmission, then noticed by about 5,000 that the shudder had pretty much gone away. shrug :?:
 

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Yep I have no idea what as happened but it's been as smooth as silk for the last 200 miles,
been leaving it on the side stand but today put it on the main I really cant see it being anything
to do with it or how it could be but we will see, it as to come to bits for the transmission oil
check in about 800 miles so will give it a good dose of looking at.
 

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FWIW, and may or may not be relevant, I have had just about no clutch shudder/engagement issues since I beveled the leading edge of the shoes back at a 30° or so included angle--"beveled" meaning that I angled the leading edge right down to the backing plate--as opposed to a chamfer.
You mean bevel like cant this area or more? :scratch:


photo: courtesy of Quantum Mech :D
 

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This is how mine is, it's only chamfer back a bit but seems to work,
the cuts were intended to move dust away from the friction area.
Like you would with noisy brake shoes.




cant remember when it last made any noise.
 

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Mine doesn't make much noise, but vibrates quite strongly when cold. Have sanded shoes and cleaned the bell, but after some highway miles it's back. Time to try someth else
 

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A little update -- chamfering and grooving certainly works, but unfortunately not for a very long time. After some 1000 miles glazing is back, so a relatively early remake was required. I feel like i will soon be able to overhaul this part in less than 20 minutes. :laughing6:

Almost sure it's caused by hwy and hill prolonged driving, so likely engine loses some ponies due to clutch slip. HiT conception seems to be right, dunno about implementation though, read some folks had problems with it also.
 

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Well Looking at these posts i see a number of obvious things that can cause problems with the hit clutch which i have used for some years now first on my majesty 300 and now on my burgman 400
1. weight can cause problems requiring the changing of the main springs also the installing of the springs need to be correct as it can cause a twist in the shoes.
2.the other problem that can go un noticed is that the clearance of the clutch to the shaft is different between the original and the hit so when the hit is torqued up the clutch is not fully against the flange on shaft its only a few thousands of an inch but enough to cause a problem as you run the bike.
need to undercut a few thou at the end of the threads near the shaft end ie the clutch is not bottoming out on the flange where threaded portion meets the main shaft. this appears to have been overlooked by all who have had problems. my 400 is an 08 model.
hope this help.
On my Yamaha i found that components were sourced from a number of suppliers and varied a few thou in tolerance that where i first saw it re clutch. and found it also on my burgy.
Hope this helps put to bed the thoughts of this clutch being a bad product. in fact it has better tolerances than the original and better material specs.
 

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Didn't think it's a bad product and when i heard about it here first time, even recommended not having it myself because liked the idea pretty much.
 

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The photo above shows what I did to my clutch pads at around 4k. It worked fine for 1500 miles, then some judder returned. It's not bad and some days it's smooth as silk once warmed up. In an effort to put that to bed, I'm going to take Cliffy's advice and try a heavier bevel and round it right off so wear doesn't degrade the bevel.

Also, everyone with a judder should check the clutch needle roller bearing for wear. Take hold of the clutch unit while it's on the shaft and check for wear in the way you would check for play in the wheel bearings. If that bearing is wearing, it will produce some judder at take off. It's easy and cheap to replace that bearing. Judder also hammers that bearing and wears it faster.
 

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Only other thing I have done was to put a small drop of oil on each of the pin's
that the shoes pivot on, it's been fine for about 4000 miles.
 

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And just a very small thing Ralph didn't tell is that he's running the HiT clutch :D
Just kidding, good idea.
 

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And just a very small thing Ralph didn't tell is that he's running the HiT clutch :D
Just kidding, good idea.

To be honest I have never been tempted with the Hit clutch, I used to be a engineer on machinery were they used a clutch very like the one Suzuki fit and they gave very little trouble, I am convinced the main problem is dust, and though no one believes me I find parking the scooter on the side stand makes a noticeable difference, only reason I can think of for this is it allows any dust to settle away from the area of the linings.
 
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