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I read some too. Found one I'm not sure is correct :

"When riding in a group it is far more important to put your most qualified/experienced/prepared rider in the drag position than it is to put that person in the lead. This person is, after all, the first person who will need to deal with an accident, is in the best position to observe the riding skills of the others and recommend changes to accommodate them if need be, and is the person that most often obtains that new lane for the group. That's plenty of activity and responsibility, and merits the best, not the worst of the group."

The ride lead is the one that determines the road ahead is safe. The lead also signals the group for the formations they need to make (single file, staggered). The ride lead is alos watching the riders, but doing it from the front. I'd rather have the most experienced trying THAT. The drag position is notmally filled by the second most experienced rider. I think that arrangement is logical.
 

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It is a good link and you find it is also listed in our Web Links
under the heading --Safety & Riding Link -- posted by jim :)
And always a good idea to introduce again :wink:
 

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billmeek said:
I read some too. Found one I'm not sure is correct :

"When riding in a group it is far more important to put your most qualified/experienced/prepared rider in the drag position than it is to put that person in the lead. This person is, after all, the first person who will need to deal with an accident, is in the best position to observe the riding skills of the others and recommend changes to accommodate them if need be, and is the person that most often obtains that new lane for the group. That's plenty of activity and responsibility, and merits the best, not the worst of the group."

The ride lead is the one that determines the road ahead is safe. The lead also signals the group for the formations they need to make (single file, staggered). The ride lead is alos watching the riders, but doing it from the front. I'd rather have the most experienced trying THAT. The drag position is notmally filled by the second most experienced rider. I think that arrangement is logical.
Oh Bill - this is an exercise in pedantry surely! :wink:

The point is you do not want a greenhorn at the back - the most experienced or the second or third most experienced YES put them at the back and rotate the lead among the experienced with the best comms.
 

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NormanB said:
Oh Bill - this is an exercise in pedantry surely! :wink:
I disagree. I think it's very appropriate to discuss items like this in the safety tips forum. i think it critical to make sure information we share is correct if possible.

NormanB said:
The point is you do not want a greenhorn at the back - the most experienced or the second or third most experienced YES put them at the back and rotate the lead among the experienced with the best comms.
Agreed. You don't want the riders with the least experience at the rear. They should be up at the front of the group behind the ride leader. My point is that the article stated the drag (or tail gunner) position is MUCH more importnat than the lead. I think that statement is incorrect.
 

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billmeek said:
The ride lead is the one that determines the road ahead is safe. The lead also signals the group for the formations they need to make (single file, staggered). The ride lead is alos watching the riders, but doing it from the front.
I will have to take the middle road on this one. I think that both the lead and "tailgunner" should be experienced riders with a good knowledge of group riding. Both positions have a major responsibility to the group.
I agree with Bill that the lead rider does determine if the road ahead is safe. But I would also add that it is still the responsibility of each rider in the group to determine for his/her self if the road ahead is safe for them. I've ridden in groups where many riders blindly follow the lead rider or the bike ahead into turns, over rises in the road, through intersections, etc. with the attitude "if he/she made it, so can I". That's a gamble, at best.
I also agree that the lead rider watches the group but usually it's for a "headlight count" to make sure everyone is accounted for and to pace the ride to keep the group together. It's the sweep rider who is in the best position to observe the groups riding habits to see if anyone needs help or be reminded of the rules. In the groups I ride with, we try to make sure that the first and last bikes can communicate with each other via CB or communicator.
I've been with groups (more than 3 - 4 riders) where the sole qualification for the leader is that they know where we are going and the last bike is the one that gets off the parking lot last. I always drop to the rear quickly and keep a safe distance because they always result in a "cluster_ _ _ _" :D
Don
 
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