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Despite the title of the article... it had some good things to say about the 400.

"Suzuki Burgman AN-400: Hello Kitty, Goodbye Dignity"
www.onewheeldrive.net
 

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GREAT artice! Thanks for sharing. Kevin's comment (on page 5) is priceless. :sign5:
 

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Thanks for the link. A fun read.

The writer is skilled and amusing. It may have been better if the had more than an hour on the machine - or if an experienced Burger rider had given him the inside track on a few operating procedures.

But positive and fun all the same. :)
 

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Hey, anyone know where those pictures are from? The one from the bridge reminds me of a bridge here in Vancouver. Looks like Burrard Bridge.

PS I haven't read through the whole article yet; I got to that picture and then skipped through to look at the other pictures, and then write this comment. Back to reading the rest of the article now.

Okay... read further on and it mentions the Sea-To-Sky Highway... so the those pictures are from around Vancouver.
 

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Made for a good read.. Articles like that will help the growing scooter world here in the U S . :)
Thanks for posting the link.
 

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Thanks, good read. I wish the mainstream bike magazines would do more reviewing the maxi scooters. :lol:
 

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NormanB said:
Thanks for the link. A fun read.

The writer is skilled and amusing. It may have been better if the had more than an hour on the machine - or if an experienced Burger rider had given him the inside track on a few operating procedures.

But positive and fun all the same. :)
Norman,
Actually we got to spend a week with the Burgman, admittedly it wasn't enough for my tastes. I really didn't to expect to like the 400, and it was one of the few bikes that I really would like to have around long term.

A few points on the operating procedures would have been cool, but there's something to be said for finding the spirit of a machine on one's own ;)

Glad folks enjoyed the read.
 

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Good article and at the end it even links the Burgmanusa site.
 

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ZenOfZoom said:
Norman,
Actually we got to spend a week with the Burgman, admittedly it wasn't enough for my tastes. I really didn't to expect to like the 400, and it was one of the few bikes that I really would like to have around long term.

A few points on the operating procedures would have been cool, but there's something to be said for finding the spirit of a machine on one's own ;)

Glad folks enjoyed the read.
WOW DOUBLE FEEDBACK -

Me on the author and him on me (and across a freakin big pond too!) Whooohooo!!!! :blob:

Thanks for that!

Well I would like to talk off line or PM you on a few of the finer points -without 'hanging out the washing in public' - which do you prefer - or do you wish to disengage?

PS: WELCOME to the forum - stick around and enjoy the ride buddy :wave:
 

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BobG said:
Norman,
It's not dirty laundry - why not hang it out?
Well because journo pieces normally get editorialised to death prior to publication, I just thought offering to go off line was a bit more empathetic. :)
 

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I sent Neil (the author of the article) an email this morning to tell him I thought it was a great review of the 400. I also informed him where I found the link and invited him to come to the forums if he had any questions or comments. I'm glad to see he accepted my invite and added a link back to the BurgmanUSA site!

Thanks Neil (aka ZenOfZoom).
 

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I think it is a fair assessment of the sport and non-sport abilities of the 400.

Funny, my experience with the brakes is different from the reviewer. I find the left brake (linked front & rear) wimpy and the right (front) brake the one that I can depend on to bring me to a stop quickly.

I plan to make more use of the "deployable high-speed aerodynamic stabilizers" in the future.
 

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30MuleTeam said:
[snipped]
Funny, my experience with the brakes is different from the reviewer. I find the left brake (linked front & rear) wimpy and the right (front) brake the one that I can depend on to bring me to a stop quickly.
[snipped].
Now then - thats one of the points I was going to raise!

If you were riding a conventional bike and you used the rear brake to stop the bike from lets say, 30 mph - how would you describe the stopping performance? Wimpy and hardly effective I guess.

The left hand lever combination brake is effectively the same EXCEPT the same hydraulic pressure value that is operating the rear brake circuit also acts on 2 teensy weeny pistons in the front brake assembly (about half the diameter of the main ones operated by the right had lever) - what these do is to shift the weight of the bike onto the front wheel and get the bike balanced for efficient braking - then by applying the front brake you get amazingly effective stopping power.

The Owners Manual actually states:

'Stopping and Braking:

1.Twist the throttle grip away from yourself to close the throttle completely.
2. Apply the front and combination brakes evenly and at the same time.'

I disagree with this except in emergency braking. In normal planned braking I apply the left (combination brake) and then when I sense the weight transfer, apply the right hand (front) and increase pressure evenly on both to set the rate I need.

A lot of people dis the combination brake but also do not know how to use it to maximum effect. I love it! If the 400 had ABS too - it would be the doggies doo dahs! :wink: :lol:
 

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Norman,

I've always applied the rear brake before the front one on any bike I've ridden. I brought this subject up in the MSF course and was told not to do that. I didn't argue with the instructors (on that topic) but still continue to use the method on my own.
 

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Bill

On a conventional bike braking system I was always taught (after rolling throttle shut).

1. Light front (to shift weight).
2 Front and back together
3. Clutch in.

The Combination system is well executed on the 400 so after rolling throttle shut:

1. Light left hand (shift weight).
2. Both together
3. Forget the clutch :lol:

In my opinion - this is the safest way, there is very little risk of lock up in wet weather/gravel with the left lever - those pistons are very small on the front circuit.

In emergency stops I have heaved on both simultaneously to the max and boy does it haul the bike to a halt (it was dry though). I practice occasionally when there is space or a quiet parking lot doing emergency stops from say 30 or 40mph - I think the brakes are absolutely superb.

I have never managed a stoppy though. :cry:
 

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I think the safest approach is using both brakes simultaneously 99% of the time, so in the event of an emergency stop you will have already developed the habit.
 
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