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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know how many watts the 650's alternator puts out -- and at what RPMs?

Thanks!
 

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Generator output (no load -cold) . 55V and more @5,000 r/min

Max, output (approx.) 375 W @5,000 r/min.

Regulated voltage 14.0 - 15.5 V @ 5,000 r/min.

Page 9-43 Service manual ( Burgman 400 )
 

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Lapine Rider said:
And thank you as well! I'm planning on gloves, liner, and maybe pants.
I've looked at the pants, and they are sure nice. I am not sure what that would do as far as electrical draw goes though. I decided that I really don't need them for now. I just wear a pair of longjohns underneath my jeans - works well enough when the temperature is in the 20's. Any colder than that, and the snow, salt & sand usually ends my riding anyway.

Be sure to get a thermostat control. You don't need that gear turned all the way up most of the time. Actually, I never have mine turned all the way up. That will help with electrical draw too, because you will only be useing as much power as you need to be comfortable.
 

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I have the Gerbings Jacket and gloves and my 650 handles the load with no problem. I read somewhere that the 650 has 120 watts available for accessories. But, like Paul said, get the thermostat (mine is the electronic with separate controls for the jacket and gloves).
It's usually very comfortable to ride with the controls set on the low to medium side when the temps are in the mid-30s and up.
Don
 

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This almost oughta be a new thread...

I originally bought gloves and a jacket liner because a) I had just bought a Termoscud Leg Warmer (product review coming as soon as I find time) and b) I thought my much-beloved riding jacket was fairly waterproof. However, the leg warmer has not worked out for me for a variety of reasons (though I think it might be a damned good product for other people) and yesterday I found out that my jacket isn't very waterproof at all by being caught 50 miles from home by a totally unpredicted soaker.

A very _cold_ soaker, I might add. When I got home, I wrung out my shirt...

Anyway, this has caused me to totally re-evaluate my riding gear plans, and I'm not at all sure what I'm going to do. I originally bought the Burgman for long trips, so I _need_ good foul weather gear. On the same token, I also need stuff that won't take up too much space when not in use. Also, since I often ride to work (in a factory, where I will be hot and have to bend and twist and get covered with nasty clothes-eating oil) I need something that I can wear easily over my work clothes and take off in a few seconds at most. (I hate arriving at work any earlier than I absolutely have to.)

Ideally, I'd like an everyday riding jacket that is also waterproof and suitable for use with my liner. And, I'd like some kind of waterproof and windproof outer pants, as well. But I wear a size 4XL in most things; for example, I just bought a pair of the biggest riding chaps on the market, and they are a bit too small.

I don't seek to ride below about 40 degrees, so electric pants are overkill. However, I keep finding myself looking at Gerbing's Ultimate Suit and wondering if it's the best answer. On the one hand, I plan to do most of my travelling in summer, when (here in the South) it's hard enough just to force one's self to keep the jacket on, much less wear armored pants. Where would I store these big, bulky armored pants on trips in the summer? And, I also ask myself, just how waterproof are these things, anyhow? Can they _truly_ serve as a replacement for a rainsuit?

What if I drop nearly a grand, and then find out they _can't_?

Right now, I'm considering going ahead and buying the Ultimate pants (or perhaps the lesser Union Ridge model) and wearing them with my current jacket for one more summer, accepting that I'm going to get very wet in the rain, and then buying an Ultimate jacket when there's money available in the Fall. Again, though, this feels like overkill. And, it's one heck of a lot of money. Or, I could buy a rainsuit-- I found one by Frog Togs that I _think_ will fit me, so long as I take my regular jacket off and ride without it-- and wear the rainpants when things are chilly to break the wind. As I said, I'll be satisfied if I can simply be truly comfortable down to forty degrees.

Any thoughts?

And, while I'm on the subject...

My regular riding gloves are Aerostitch Ropers; plain, uninsulated elkskin. They are also not waterproof. I like these gloves a lot, so much that I hate to give them up. Yet, clearly, I either need to find something more waterproof, or else find big, neoprene dish-type gloves to wear over the Ropers when it's wet out. (I am using the Gerbing's gloves for foul weather now, without plugging them in. However, they will be too hot in summer.)

And, yes, I have a variable heat controller on back-order. Gerbing's is currently out of stock, they tell me. So, for the nonce I'm using an on/off switch they gave me for free. (In my opinion, said on/off switch is worth only very slightly more than I paid.)

Thanks for any suggestions!
 

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The accessories manager at my local dealership says that Gerbing does not call their pants waterproof. The do refer to them as "water resistant". The reason is that the side zippers are designed for convenience, and do not have a velcro flap to seal over them. He pointed me toward First Gear pants, if "waterproof" was a requirement. I'm sure that there are other alternatives too. Aerostitch owners usually seem pretty enthusiastic about their gear. Pricey, but well thought of.

Frog Toggs helped me out nicely. I am very tall, and I needed different sizes in pants and jacket. They figured out the combination that would work for me, and they seem to fit fine. I'd say give them a call and discuss your needs. I found them to be good to work with. I do not think the Frogg Toggs would be 100% waterproof in a downpour though, because the pass through pocket openings just snap shut. Some water could seep in there I think. I have not had the opportunity to test my theory - and I'm not complaining about that either. :wink:

But the reason I bought Frogg Toggs is that they could come up with a fit for me. Two other brands I sent inquiries to could not.
 

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LaspineRider: Suggest you contact this fellow - Mile Vlahos - at http://www.heatedclothing4you.com/productsframe.html .
Mike is Gerbings #1 dealer (that's all he sells). I bought my gear from him last Fall. I'm sure he will give you a straight answer on the waterproof questions. Also, I'd bet he has the thermostats in stock
Don
 

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Lapine Rider said:
...yesterday I found out that my jacket isn't very waterproof at all by being caught 50 miles from home by a totally unpredicted soaker.

A very _cold_ soaker, I might add. When I got home, I wrung out my shirt...

Anyway, this has caused me to totally re-evaluate my riding gear plans, and I'm not at all sure what I'm going to do. I originally bought the Burgman for long trips, so I _need_ good foul weather gear. On the same token, I also need stuff that won't take up too much space when not in use.
I have a two-piece Nelson-Rigg rain suit. No insulation of any kind, it's designed to be worn over other clothing. The pieces fold very flat, and I keep them in my trunk at all times.

I try to avoid riding in wet weather, and keeping up with the Weather Channel has been mostly successful; but I deliberatly took one week-end ride in the rain just for the experience. The Nelson-Rigg gear kept me dry as a bone. Being rubberized cloth, they're noisy and somewhat stuffy, but they keep out every drop of water even when riding for hours on the freeway in a downpour (I went from Seattle to Corvalis, Oregon one night and returned the next, and it rained continuously for both legs).
 

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I lot of times you will find that if you can keep the cold air from hitting your body it helps more then extra warmth. A good rain suit or light (tight nit) nylon jacket will work lot of times.
Remember you are fighting the "Wind Chill Factor" all the time, not necessarily the cold.
If it were 20 deg. out and I was going for a walk it would not be to much problem to dress warm enough to walk around or stand still in a dear blind (pun intended).
But get on a bike dressed like that and you would freeze .
Just 2 cents worth from Sunny Warm South Texas :D
 
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