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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I spent this afternoon changing the engine oil and filter, transmission oil, and final drive oil. I also changed out the air filter.
I don't have a video recording device other than my smart phone and don't have an easy way to post videos so I'll just stick to photos.
I did remember to take photos of the removal of panels bit but I figure once that is done you all can figure out how what it looks like to reinstall those panels.
I found that you really DON'T need to remove the left side leg shield (front white panel on mine). At least not completely. I was able to remove the left rear lower foot board and under center cover (one piece really) by simply removing one screw at the rear of the left side leg shield and it would flex out plenty far to remove the rear panel, after all the fasteners for that panel were removed of course. So it wasn't as bad as having to remove the entire set of panels from under the headlight all the way back to the final drive.

So here goes...
No need for comments about how dirty the scoot is. I know. I was wanting to get this maintenance done first before I washed it so the photos will all show a REALLY dirty bike.

I started by removing the rear floor mat and remove the 3 screws that hold the lower foot board, then remove the plastic rivet at the very rear end underside of the lower foot board. Then I removed the 2 larger bolts along the bottom of the under center cover, the large plastic rivet under the center just in front of the center stand, and the large plastic rivet just next to the side stand. Then I removed only the rear half of the forward floor mat and removed one screw holding the rear end of the leg shield. All indicated in the first 6 photos.

The under center cover and left rear lower foot board as well as the rear end of the left side leg shield will now be loose.
Starting at the rear end of it all carefully pull the left rear lower foot board panel out to the side being especially careful of the hooks at the front of the rear foot board. The under center cover will catch on the center stand but it will flex around this with your help. As you gently pull the panel out away from the scoot the front part will start to pull away. Take care again around the joint where the under center black panel connects to the white (mine) left lower leg shield. Carefully separate these 2 panels. I left my side stand down during this and as the forward panel separated from the rear panel the under center cover (rear panel) can slip down the side stand to remove it completely from the scooter. The start of this is shown in photos 7 and 8. You can actually see where I already had the panels separated in photo 5 as well. I did note that the center part of the last plastic lock-tab between the white panel and the black panel is broken and this may have assisted me doing this in the first place. I don't know for sure.

Photo 9 shows everything exposed that needs to be to do the transmission oil change and final drive oil change. I've already removed the final drive cover here. No photo since that is rather obvious to those who would do this. 4 bolts hold it on. The only 4 bolts in the cover. Remove those and the cover comes off. I tapped the cover on the floor to get the dust out and also brushed off the final drive housing before I replaced the cover after it was done.

Since there is a file limit for attached files/photos I am continuing in my next post on this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Continued from post 1.

In photo 1 of this post I am pointing to the engine oil drain bolt.
In photos 2 and 3 I am pointing to the transmission oil fill bolt (long stem sticking out to make it easier to get to) and the transmission oil level bolt.
In photo 4 I point to the transmission oil drain bolt. It is a rounded head Allen head socket type.
In photo 5 I point to the final drive drain bolt.
In photo 6 I point to the final drive fill/level port (bolt is already removed in this photo). This port is both fill and level for the final drive.

I also removed the maintenance cover on the left side of the engine hump to access the engine oil fill cap.
If the ambient air temp is very warm you may choose not to run the engine to heat up the oil. Or is you do run the engine let it cool some before doing any of this since oil can be hot. It hurts when it's hot since it sticks and burns deeper in the skin before you can get it off you.

First remove the engine oil fill cap. With your oil catch pan under the engine oil drain bolt AND also under the oil filter if possible (some drain pans are smaller than others).
Then remove the engine oil drain bolt to start the oil draining.
While the engine oil is draining remove the oil filter (if you are replacing the filter this time). I replace my oil filter at every oil change.
Use some of the drained oil to lube the gasket of the new oil filter and install the new filter. The manual calls for turning the filter 2 times after first contact of the gasket but I was only able to get just over 1.75 turns of the filter even with a special oil filter pliers that I usually use to remove filters. I do have the special filter tool cap but that would not stay on the official Suzuki oil filter I was installing for more than 1.5 turns so I used my pliers tool to get a little more turn on the filter.
Install the oil drain bolt with a new crush washer and apply 16.5 lb/ft torque. It has been mentioned in other threads/posts to use anti-seizing compound on threads. Good idea.

Now add oil at the oil fill port until it shows in the oil inspection glass. Don't pass the full mark. Replace the oil fill cap.

Next I removed the transmission inspection and level bolts. I did remove both since my oil pump works better putting oil into the fill port as it fills the opening. I found when I removed the level bolt a whole lot of oil drained out as if the dealer where I bought the scooter had not taken that bolt out to fill it and simply added oil all the way up to the fill port! I really don't think that much oil migrated from the clutch into the transmission gear case and the site glass never showed any loss of oil from the engine.
Then removed the transmission oil drain bolt to finish draining that oil.

Reinserted the transmission oil drain bolt (15 lb/ft torque) and proceeded to fill until oil just starts spilling out the level opening. I use a oil pump to get the oil into the transmission. Reinstalled the remaining 2 bolts and torqued (15 lb/ft for the level bolt and 16.5 lb/ft for the fill bolt). Done with the transmission oil change.

Now for the final drive oil change.
Put your oil catch pan under the end of the final drive.
Remove the oil level plug (photo 6) and then remove the oil drain plug.
When oil is done draining replace the oil drain plug and torque to 24 lb/ft.
I flushed my oil pump of the engine oil and then used it to fill the final drive with proper oil.
When the oil just begins to flow out of the fill/level port I then replace the level/fill plug and torque to 24 lb/ft.
All done with the final drive oil change.

Before I button up everything and replace the plastic that was removed I run the engine until the engine warms up and then turn it off and let it sit for about 5 minutes.
Then I recheck the engine oil level in the site glass. I can guarantee the oil level will have gone down a little. The filter needed to be filled and some oil needed to be pushed over to the clutch.
I add a little oil to at least the middle of the site glass, or half way between center and the full mark. Don't over fill the engine oil.

Then I count is as done and proceed with reinstalling the plastics in reverse order of removal. Important to remember to start at the front for the left leg shield connecting to the under center cover/rear lower foot board. Carefully guide the cover over the side stand and mesh the tabs between the 2 panels. Then work from the front and carefully snap the tabs and hooks back together onto the scooter.
It is best to install all the plastic rivets first before inserting the screws since there is still some movement with the plastic rivets in place and no movement once the screws are tightened.
After all fasteners are reinserted reinstall the foot board mats. Then the maintenance panel on the side of the engine hump.

All done.
Go riding.

I do recheck engine oil level for a while after riding and check for oil drips under the scoot just to make sure it's not leaking oil someplace.

BTW- During this maintenance I also replaced the air filter. I did buy a replacement air filter so I can simply swap them out and then wash the one that is out so it is ready to go back in at the right time.
 

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rjs987, THANK YOU !

You obviously put numerous hours in this complete exposé and step by step guide to help your fellow 650 owners with 2013 - 2018 bikes, the 2 posts here with the explanations and photos are unquestionably extremely time consuming.

I will try this as you have presented and hopefully will not break a tab. :grin

Once again thank you for your undertaking and time. :smile :smile

.
 

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Dave_J can you make this a sticky under 2013 - 2018 2nd generation Burgman 650 series and should be part of the knowledge base as well however I have no idea how to proceed with that.
.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Unforgivable dirt on your bike.
I'll send you my bike so you can clean it as punishment. :grin

Thank you very much for your time and for sharing it with us.
I consider it a badge of honor and proof that I actually RIDE my scoot at times others wimp out and enclose themselves in a cage to get around.
Actually there are times I cage it too... when I need to carry more than will fit on the scoot. I can only carry 13 chicken cages on the pillion and/or 3 of my grand kids (that's why I use Rox straps since they've figured out how to unhook regular bungee cords) :grin
I have been known to strap on a new set of tires to take to the dealer to install. That's the only real purpose I have for the passenger backrest.


One of these days I'll remove that and maybe sell it here. I'd install the Suzuki official top case mounting plate in it's place either with or without the top case (mostly without unless traveling LD).

.
 

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I can ask Motorcycle,Com's Admin to add another sub forum page but they do not give us moderators that power.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Dave_J can you make this a sticky under 2013 - 2018 2nd generation Burgman 650 series and should be part of the knowledge base as well however I have no idea how to proceed with that.
.
I can ask Motorcycle,Com's Admin to add another sub forum page but they do not give us moderators that power.
I think for now is would be sufficient to simply make it a sticky in the current Burgman 650 forum if that is desired. Up to the mods on that.
 

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welp, I did an oil and filter change only on my 15 today and was agoing to do a blow by blow on it, if anyone thinks it would be a good idea , shoot me a line and I will go ahead and do it, I will add, get a k&n oil filter for next time, the size 15 metric nut on the end makes a whole lotta easy, on both installation and removal. the air filter is so easy except for getting the correct part ordered it is hardly worth writing about, however it is still difficult enough to celebraate with a refarshing beverage when you are finished .
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Just a note of caution about filters that have the nut on the end. Really really bad idea to install the filter using that nut. K&N had a recall a little while ago because people were doing that and the filter would fail at the nut from the strain of installation on the filter can. It's great for removing the filter but dangerous to install using it. Personally I have a band/strap wrench that I use to both install and remove a filter. I also have the official "tool" made for doing that but prefer the strap wrench.

The I have is similar to this dual handle set but mine is much much older (have had it for over 20 years).

Craftsman 2 Piece rubber strap wrench
 

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A few years ago I was removing my Burgman's K&N oil filter. That nut is tack welded on and the weld broke. Oil was leaking at the tack weld. I had installed it hand tight and the last turn was with both hands so it was on real good but less than the amount that K&N said, they say like 1/4 turn.
 

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agreed, the nut is for removal of a hot slippery filter, road grime and such, I install by hand and have never had a leak or problem, but then I do have a very strong grip due to some extra curricular activities .
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Changed the engine/transmission(reduction gear set) and final drive oils and oil filter today. Over the last week and a half I've been riding (most days) to my son's house to work on framing a bedroom and bathroom in the basement of their new house. About 46 miles round trip, 278 miles altogether during that time. That put the odometer just over 14550 and the service interval was at 14500. I also checked the rear brakes today but still have pad left for a another 500 miles. I had to remove the caliper to check the pads since I needed to clean off the brake dust just to see the little notch showing when to replace. It was coated so I couldn't see it. I'll have to simply note the thickness on the new pads as they wear (after I get around to installing them) since they don't have that wear notch. I did find I will need to replace one of the pad pins soon. the socket is rounded out inside so that one will be a bear to remove. I'll replace both at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just a note about the oil level indicated in the sight glass...
After I reinserted the oil drain plug (to proper torque), and the oil filter, I added enough oil initially to fill the sight glass to the very top of the glass. I initially could not see the top level of oil but knew it was just at the top of the sight glass. After inserting the fill plug and started the engine to let it warm up and circulate new oil around and through the clutch and filter. WHILE the engine was running there was NO oil showing in the sight glass. This is normal. After running the engine for about 6-7 minutes I then shut off the engine and let it sit for about 5 minutes (while I went to get the mail). When I checked the sight glass just after that the oil level was just below the top "F" line, at almost 2/3 of the sight glass. I called it good for now. I'll check it again each time after the next few rides and add more if needed but I don't think, from past experience, it will be needed. We'll see.
 
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