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Jac Vinson, the inventor of the seat-extender for the Burgman, once told me that he hauled several heavy items in the trunk of his 650 Burg only to be nicely surprised....Jac added that the extra weight in the trunk provided a more smooth ride and general better ride.

I recently tried adding two 10 lbs. sand bags (the sort you wear at a sports club with velocro) to the trunk. I shifted them forward in front of the rear axle. Well, now during heavy cross-winds and highway speeds, I experience much less buffeting with my Givi XXL, although most people will notice an added benefit of having them in the trunk.

The manual suggests having no more than 22 pounds in the trunk. The sand bags are flat and take up little space, so you have plenty of space to store other items.

Red
 

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Red,

I wonder how much actual difference they make. 20 pounds isn't really that much weigh compared to the bike and rider. If it's just compressing the rear shock, couldn't you get the same effect by changing the pre-load setting?
 

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billmeek said:
Red,

I wonder how much actual difference they make. 20 pounds isn't really that much weigh compared to the bike and rider.
It seems that way to me, too.

I don't know how much Red weighs, but in my case 607 pounds of bike plus 230 pounds of rider = 837 pounds.

Adding 20 pounds to the trunk would make it 857 pounds, or a difference of only 2.3%. I wonder if I could even tell the difference, or if I would just experience the plecebo effect (that which you think will work, you think works).
 

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I know just changing the preload dosen't do it. I noticed Riding 2-up with saddlebags, fully loaded, maxed out weight (1,000#), the ride is the best with a setting of 5 for touring. The ride is very smooth, and the handling is fine. Without the saddlebags (about 30#), we run a setting of 4. 20-30 lbs, can make a big difference.
Many others, as well as me, feel the rear suspension could be improved on for riding solo. Some have changed out the rear shocks and have gotten some improvement. I wonder if the springs are the culpret, being just a bit heavy. I guess It's set up perfect for someone that goes over 300#.
 

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There is no doubt the Burgman is definetely smoother with 2up. I ride with my shock setting @ 4 on solo trips and bump it up to 5 for 2 up.
 

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There were two times last year that I really was impressed with the nice ride quality of my AN650.

1. When I carried 3 cases of soda/pop home from the store in my underseat trunk.

2. When I carried a large watermelon home from the store in my underseat trunk.

Would I carry 20 lb sand bags as a regular thing? Absolutely not. The cumulative penalties in mileage & tire wear are not worth it. And although the scoot still handled fine at a relaxed pace on suburban streets, there would be a big penalty assessed at a brisker pace on curvy roads.
 

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Error on my last post :oops:

Preload Settings

Fully loaded setting of 5

2-up no saddlebags setting of 4

Solo setting of 3
 

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Jim said:
...20-30 lbs, can make a big difference.
Many others, as well as me, feel the rear suspension could be improved on for riding solo....
I wonder if this accounts for my impression of the ride being better than what many others feel; since I weigh 230 I'm probably 20 - 30 pounds (or more) heavier than most other Burgman riders.
 

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I just realized something this morning while reading this post about weight and ride quality. Well people are noticing a difference with a measely 20lbs. Well in another post I refered to the new Pirelli tires that I just mounted to being more sensitive. Well I just realized that this winter I lost 25 lbs in body weight. I'm assuming that this loss of weight is what is partially responsible for the difference in ride quality.


Hmmmm I wonder. I think this calls for more riding ,testing and adjusting. Any reason to ride more :D
 

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So a fuller gas tank makes the ride better. Hmmm....

'Course that means it will get worse as you use up the gas.
Bigger tank?

Give free rides to any good looking girls...
Taxi service?

This could get to be an interesting thread. :wink:
 

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In my trunk: carry Tire repair kit, tire pump or cylinders, rain suit, extra helmet, tool kit, bike cover, cable lock, disc lock, extra jacket, the list goes on........Who needs sand bags? Can't repair anything with them anyways. Rusty
 

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rusty said:
In my trunk: carry Tire repair kit, tire pump or cylinders, rain suit, extra helmet, tool kit, bike cover, cable lock, disc lock, extra jacket, the list goes on........Who needs sand bags? Can't repair anything with them anyways. Rusty
You live in the great white north. They would be good for those freak snow storms you may encounter riding in the mountains.
 

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If you are trying to improve dynamic stability of your vehicle by simply adding weight, you must also consider where you add the weight. Total weight is not the primary determinate of stability. All else being equal, stability is improved by moving the center of gravity forward and decreased by moving the center of gravity rearward. In the example of 20 lb. weights, they would improve stability most if placed in the extreme forward part of the trunk.
Adding the same weight to the forward portion of the footboards would increase stability even more; hanging it from the rear fender would decrease stability.
Be aware that this process increases the vehicles resistance to changing direction (like trying to steer your shopping cart with your kid hanging on the front) through increased polar intertia. It also degrades the reaction capability of the vehicle when changing direction by a commensurate amount.
Displacing the center of gravity to the rear will allow increased ability to change direction quickly but reduce inherent stabilty and, in the extreme, cause inherent instability.
All this assumes no change in roll center, steering geometry, slip angle of the tires or aerodynamic factors.
 
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