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Discussion Starter · #101 · (Edited)
No need sorry, @DarisPakar, all very useful info for me, and much appreciated.

Once I'm underway, it'll be too late!

You'd asked a good question about cell phone coverage in another thread, I'll paste my thoughts here as the reply was a bit too wordy... 😜

Cell phone coverage will be a top priority - that's how I can get help, if needed, know which way to go, and connect to my family and friends, and send pics to you guys 😎

All countries I'm passing thru have tourist SIM options (actually, prolly all countries, period), so that'll be the first thing I buy as I cross the border, aiming for the biggest data package possible, with rechargeable scratchy-card if it runs out - packages with minutes for local calls won't be my interest, I just need 2-3-more GB GSM Internet.

Plus, my phone has dual SIM capacity, so I'll have my regular number on roaming as back-up, but the charges will be $$$. Those would be emergency calls, if necessary. To the local services - though honestly, better I figure I'm on my own for that - and for any real serious situation, to the embassy. They'll scramble in support, and I have great trust in them. Stories you may hear of embassies not helping usually have a sub-story we don't know - for a law-abiding citizen, not involved in any monkey business, they'll have your back.

Cell coverage won't be 100%, especially in between towns, but it's not too bad, and on my estimation a satellite phone is not required. I'm not crossing the Pacific solo on a sailboat, and almost all places, like even the most remote grocery store, staffed by one smiley old guy, his one tooth, and his donkey, will have wifi and phone charging service. Even a video-gaming computer for hourly hire for the area's youths to reduce their brain cells! So everywhere is very much digital and connected.

I'll have multiple chargers, both on the Burgman and for wall sockets, and also a solar charger/battery in case really stranded up the the proverbial creek without a running engine or hotel room.

And I'll have a back-up device, too, also with dual SIM and with in-built GPS, in case my phone disappears or calls it quits. If both are taken or lost, I'll buy a cheap phone first chance I get.

In the end, after all this layer upon layer of redundancy for self-sufficiency, almost everyone I'll meet will have a phone on them, and I would be super-surprised if they wouldn't let a nice white-bearded foreign guy make a call if he asked... Plus almost every cafe or restaurant will have some sort of wifi, and again I'd be really surprised if they wouldn't share the password with a stranger in need who asked sincerely to connect to his loved ones.

Travelling the unknowns can be challenging, but even in pre-internet times we managed, oftentimes with the help of big-hearted strangers; and nowadays the risks of getting lost or the time lapse in between comms are astounding in their brilliance. I remember having to mail stuff ahead to a post office someplace in the future, c/o poste restante, and then somehow finding my parcel there waiting for me LOL and my poor Mom would not hear from me for months, until I'd mail a letter, and receive one back after another month or so!
 

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Embassy help is always there, contrary to Hollywood movies. In my travels around Europe I have had to call them a couple times for minor "Status of Forces" issues when caught without a passport when my Military ID card was my passport.

When I volunteered to ride a Harley 1200 from the Seattle area to Panama City Panama I got stopped by a local Mexican cop for going 28 MPH in a 25 MPH zone. I refused to pay the 50 Paso's fine to him. 50 Paso's was a LOT of money back in 1979

I was required by my cousin to check in each night and also to call with any issues along the way. He had my route mapped out too. When I did not check in that night he started calling Police stations along my route. At about 4 AM when he found a Police station that said they had an American in jail for a serious infraction he just called the US Embassy in Mexico. At 5 AM I was woke, allowed to shower and brought over to a house where I had a huge breakfast. The Harley had been washed and full of gas too. It had about 150 more miles on it from the night before too.

May have been helpful that my Cousin was a Captain in the US Marines stationed in Panama at the US Embassy..... 🤪
 

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Discussion Starter · #104 ·
Another little step forward: added a homemade front fender extender.

Wheel Tire Automotive tail & brake light Automotive lighting Vehicle


While I had the front wheel off... just cut out a plastic cover of a document folder I had. It was the right color LOOL

"If possible, use what you already have," is my anti-consumerism war cry - usually followed by "but I really need that..." 😂

Automotive parking light Tire Wheel Automotive tire Car


Just gave the old fender a good scrub, then alcohol rub, and applied two-sided velcro adhesive, heated it up.

We'll see if it holds. If not, next we'll use rivets or some sort of metal fasteners.
 

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I used 3 alumimn "Binder" buttons to secure mine. I just filed then down shorter to make them fit.

These are $30 USD for 100 each. But you may have a stationary store that may carry some cheaper.
 
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Discussion Starter · #107 · (Edited)
3-hour testride today: packing is basically done.

Underseat plus a soft bag sticking out the sides, with also side protection benefit if the bike is dropped at a stop or low speeds, one single bag easy to remove and cover for rain, and especially it doesn't signal "rich world motorcycle tourer".

Simple, effective, and using what I already have - very happy.

My neighbor remarked that with all that space I could add another sack and trade carpets from village to village along the way to pay for my petrol 😂😂😂

Wheel Tire Sky Vehicle Plant


Tire Plant Bicycle tire Bicycle frame Bicycle handlebar


Wheel Tire Sky Plant Vehicle


On a less happy note, I tested on rough tarmac - cracks, potholes, and layers of repairs, none of them any good - and the Burgman suffered. This is where you need the long-travel suspension and 17-18" wheels of the adventure bikes. I'm going to have go slow, and get shaken not stirred... Also, ride height is so low that clearance on the bigger bumps could be an issue. I didn't bottom out this testride, but I'll need to see what the limits are on another ride.

Lastly, I tested the El cheapo throttle lock, and it works perfectly fine - so that stays 😎

Tire Bicycle tire Wheel Bicycle Automotive tire


Easy adjustment with my finger, and it holds just like it's supposed to. No worries at all on deceleration. Yes, rpm drops uphill, but a flick of the finger on approach solves that. Another little step forward!
 

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Discussion Starter · #108 · (Edited)
Another step forward, another green light - had my first overnight Burg camp-out as part of testing and preparations, and full marks, everything hunky-dory :LOL: love that! Haven't said hunky-dory in ages!!! I guess it's the "Burgman effect!" LOOL

Branch Wood Twig Trunk Gesture


Last time I checked, I'm quite sure I had two legs, with a foot at the end of each one...

Anyways, 300 km trip, smooth as silk, no baboon bottom - found a couple of willing trees out behind a construction site on the outskirts, undisturbed sleep with construction site guard looking over me: lovely chap, from the Punjab, shared a grotty-looking but tasty pancakey-samosa left-over thing with me in the morning - he prolly thought I was worse off than him to be sleeping off my scooter... then straight to the sea for a morning swim! Followed by breakfast at Tim Horton's - yes, indeed civilization has reached us even out here in the sands of eternal time :cool:

Water Sky People on beach Azure Natural environment


My yellow helmet enjoyed the beach, too :)

All good, and my little notebook which I'd prepared to write down issues I need to address remained empty. Majority is my regular camping kit anyways, so I know it well. A note that taking a full cover for the Burg was a good idea - keeping that. It takes the focus right off the shiny bike, and it looks like something half-abandoned. Also hides my bags. I'll have to get a steel net so I can do that in countries that don't chop off hands - there's not space in the hammock as there is in a tent, so I was curious as to how the cover would work. Also it cuts reflections and blends the bike into the darkness when parked next to the trees and hammock: no mirrors, reflectors, lights, etc.

Mexican and weird Margarita with upside-down cerveza for lunch, and back home.

Food Tableware Ingredient Recipe Dishware


Food Bottle Cocktail Ingredient Tableware


So, cargo-carrying capacity and camping efficiency are both five stars on the Burgman 400. On with the next phase!
 

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Discussion Starter · #110 ·
Did the hammock test come after that lunch ? 😁
😁 my mpg sure suffered on the way back after lunch!

BTW, app shows mpg of 66.18 average (3.55L/100km), 82.79 highway (2.84), and 55.12 city (4.27) - that's about right?

Fully loaded, minus non-riding clothes, so I'm happy with that, too.

That would mean an estimated 355 liters of petrol for the trip to EU (assuming 10,000 km) - that's 6,200 miles with 94 US gallons / 78 imperial.

Let's say average of 1.1 euro / 1.1 USD per liter (cheaper for the first 5k km, then up to 1.5 once in EU) that would put my fuel cost at 400 euros/ US dollars... not bad at all!
 

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Discussion Starter · #112 ·
It's called a Coronarita... 😁 🤙 🍹
Ah cool :love:

I almost sent it back - I'd asked for the bartender to choose my drink (same with the wait staff, just to try new stuff, and they know what's good) but when it came I thought he was taking the mickey - but, no, they assured me it was bona fide.

It was good, actually - the Corona plays well with lime, and so was at home in the Margarita :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #113 ·
Just a quick update :) All good my end, and now considering the first major bureaucratic decision - perhaps you can help weigh in:

The Burgman is registered and running UAE plates, and I'm the legal owner, so that's all in the clear. The issue is once it leaves the country. There are two options, one for people who want to tour internationally and then return to origin; and the other for people who want a one-way trip. I'm unsure at this stage and would like to keep my options open.

Option 1. The Burg stays on UAE plates and remains registered in UAE, and I get a "Trip Ticket" (aka Carnet de Passage) which is like a passport for vehicles, gets stamped at the borders upon both entry and exit, and requires a hefty cash deposit to guarantee that the vehicle will in fact exit the countries, and which is refunded upon return to the country of origin. If it doesn't return to origin, as intended, some documents need to be submitted with the request for refund - a bit unclear at this stage.

Option 2. The Burg is de-registered in UAE and export plates are applied, and I carry an Export Certificate which proves I am the owner. At each border I'm let through, hopefully, but it's unclear whether a Trip Ticket / Carnet is also required (most countries have dropped the Carnet requirement) and it's also unclear how long the vehicle can stay in each country along the way, since the intention is to cross directly to the destination country, where the vehicle should be imported. This could very well be what I end up doing, since I'm not too sure about reaching EU, turning around and riding another 10k km all the way back!

I'm trying to connect with someone official who knows, within the police, Ministry of Interior, vehicle licensing dept, etc. but so far no luck. The UAE Automobile Club, which normally handles the Carnet, apparently is no longer involved.

Anyone here have any experience or advice?
 

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Discussion Starter · #115 ·
I can’t answer your question but I’m glad your back.

I was afraid you rear-ended a camel, 🙀
Much better than getting rear-ended by a camel! :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

No real news: Burgman chugging along strong, all kit is ready, have a few preventative repairs on the to-do-list, but now time to figure out the bureaucratic details for the scooter, and inquire about insurances. My own visas prolly a month before, not too early.
 

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Just a quick update :) All good my end, and now considering the first major bureaucratic decision - perhaps you can help weigh in:

The Burgman is registered and running UAE plates, and I'm the legal owner, so that's all in the clear. The issue is once it leaves the country. There are two options, one for people who want to tour internationally and then return to origin; and the other for people who want a one-way trip. I'm unsure at this stage and would like to keep my options open.

Option 1. The Burg stays on UAE plates and remains registered in UAE, and I get a "Trip Ticket" (aka Carnet de Passage) which is like a passport for vehicles, gets stamped at the borders upon both entry and exit, and requires a hefty cash deposit to guarantee that the vehicle will in fact exit the countries, and which is refunded upon return to the country of origin. If it doesn't return to origin, as intended, some documents need to be submitted with the request for refund - a bit unclear at this stage.

Option 2. The Burg is de-registered in UAE and export plates are applied, and I carry an Export Certificate which proves I am the owner. At each border I'm let through, hopefully, but it's unclear whether a Trip Ticket / Carnet is also required (most countries have dropped the Carnet requirement) and it's also unclear how long the vehicle can stay in each country along the way, since the intention is to cross directly to the destination country, where the vehicle should be imported. This could very well be what I end up doing, since I'm not too sure about reaching EU, turning around and riding another 10k km all the way back!

I'm trying to connect with someone official who knows, within the police, Ministry of Interior, vehicle licensing dept, etc. but so far no luck. The UAE Automobile Club, which normally handles the Carnet, apparently is no longer involved.

Anyone here have any experience or advice?
is there a time limit on leaving it regirstered ? like maybe go , decide you don't want to ride back yoet, fly home for a spell fly back and get the burgy and ride back?
 

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Discussion Starter · #118 ·
is there a time limit on leaving it regirstered ? like maybe go , decide you don't want to ride back yoet, fly home for a spell fly back and get the burgy and ride back?
Web mostly says one can ride on foreign plates in EU for 6 months, so that's a pretty good window. Can't ride back in summer, though.
 

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that would probably cover getting stuck waiting for parts somewhere too,, I gotta trhink, after I completed my journey, riding back wouldn't be as much fun or adventure and I might lose motivation (unless there were a few :devilish: motivating factors on the ride back.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #120 ·
that would probably cover getting stuck waiting for parts somewhere too,, I gotta trhink, after I completed my journey, riding back wouldn't be as much fun or adventure and I might lose motivation (unless there were a few :devilish: motivating factors on the ride back.)
Yes, just what I'm thinking.

If it were a round-trip, it might be worth the double time and cost, and if my butt isn't sore enough, too! LOL

But just to turn around and basically retrace my route - nope.

Tomorrow it seems I get to meet "the captain who knows" here at the vehicle licensing Dept - let's see what he advises.
 
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