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2008 AN400
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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
The large GIVI shield looks like a good design and functional. Is it one piece? Is the top part of the shield an add on?
Yes, it's two parts, and the upper can adjust the airflow by sliding up or down.

AF266 - GIVI Airflow Sliding Windscreen for Suzuki Burgman 400 06-16, HxW max 81x67 cm, 12 cm sliding, fits oe
headlight fairing, fitting hardware included € 145,90

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This guy shows it from 0:36

 

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I use the same one. It works very well at keeping the weather off me and makes for a relaxed ride.
In very hot weather I take the adjustable section off completely to get some cooling air flow on me. It stores under the seat (without the full expedition gear)
 

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2008 AN400
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Discussion Starter · #45 · (Edited)
WOW! What an Excellent Adventure! The prep and the upcoming ride, all the best!
Thanks @BurgDanno - happy to share it with you all!

I'm taking it one step at a time, with each completed phase pushing me closer to departure date - exciting times :cool:

So far:

1. vehicle choice
2. mechanical check and baseline service
and just today: 3. first long ride!

Next phases, something like:

4. touring mods (including packing...)
5. long-distance test-runs (need to build up stamina, but also test all equipment)
6. bureaucratic docs (carnet, visas, insurance, medical, import upon arrival to EU, etc.)
7. route (flexible, but I do need a general idea LOL)
8. final service (got to give myself the best chance possible to avoid mechanical issues, especially before reaching EU)
9. Let's do it!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 · (Edited)
First ride went exceedingly well, and I'm now sure the Burgman can take me 10,000 km to EU!

I did my research, trusted the Burgman and maxi-scooter community reviews, but at time of purchase I could only sneak a ride down the street and back.. so it was a bit of a gamble - one that I now know will most probably pay off :cool:

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Consider that the other bike I'd short-listed for this trip was a late-90s BMW R1150GS, which is considered the grandpappy of overland touring!

But the Burgman won out... at least in my own decision-making.

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This morning, not too long a ride, as I wanted to get a feel for braking, cornering, acceleration, swerving, all those fun maneuvers, so important to build confidence with the new bike. Also, sharp eye on the engine temperature, vibrations, posture, comfort, air protection, etc.

Superb in all regards - what a great bike!!!

And I'm an experienced rider, carrying 40+ years of riding all sorts of bikes, with the most recent being a Ducati S2R 800.

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And although the Burg pros know all this already, this may be useful to people considering a Burgman 400.

Overall, I think the overall comfort is its best feature, though it's swingable and lots of fun in the corners, and also super-easy to ride - also fast enough, while not being scary.

Feet forward and leaning back while accelerating out of turns is a total hoot - grinning ear to ear!

But the Burgman seems to be in the zone everywhere.

Here's the road I took:

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I was wary of the smaller diameter tyres - not an issue. Super confident in curves. We'll see in wet conditions.

Pressed to find 'the best' feature, I'd probably say the various riding positions possible, behind that fantastic windshield!

What I learned: I found I was slipping forward on the seat, but it was because I was keeping my feet too far back, almost like a traditional motorcyce - all changed when I stretched out my legs forward. Also, I felt I needed quite hard pulling of the brakes, which fatigued my fingers; but I think it will improve when I lower the levers. They're set a bit high for me. Possibly it's also the absence of downshifting: and of course no foot lever for rear braking! Lastly, I missed leaning into the fuel tank, especially on longer turns, but leaning back fixed that!

All in all - superb first ride. Couldn't have gone better for someone wanting a long-distance road machine :cool:
 

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I'm 72 yo, 6', 270+/- lbs...scootin' around town yesterday, I decided the 400 fits me perfectly. It really is a fun, nimble, fast enough bike that suits my needs just fine. Not going to be doing any long trips, just fun cruising around town and some errands, maybe a ride up to Prescott would be my longest ride, there's a nice curvy route up through Yarnell, etc. After a while the seat feels a little hard, but maybe I'll get my butt used to it.
Ecoregion Map Slope Screenshot Event

It's about 1 1/2 hr ride from my house one-way.
 

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ride that route again and take a camera, I'm pretty sure you can get some snaps of yourself coming around the curve behind yourself or going around the curve in front of you, (be sure to blank out the license plate numbers)
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 · (Edited)
Bike looks great…..You might think about packing a spare rear tire or source one to be waiting for you at the 8.5k km mark.
Thanks - good advice.

I'll slap on new tyres before departure, and at the 8.5k km mark I should be in Greece, or thereabouts - over the Bosphorous Straight and on EU soil at any rate - and so finding new rubber should be OK (but pricier!).

Actually, perhaps last few days in Turkey may be a better place to shop for scooter tyres and parts... web says the Burgman 400 is available there, and in general Turkey produces many auto/moto parts, that are then sold in EU at hefty mark-up.

Scooters are also popular in Iran, where there is also a Suzuki dealer, though it doesn't offer the Burgman nor motorcycles over 250cc - tyre size might be a problem. Or, it could be an opportunity to cross over to the darkside! There would be no debate about pros and cons of installing a car tyre, and I wouldn't hesitate one instant if it would keep me going.

In any case, DHL and other couriers deliver to all major cities along the route , so if I really had to spring for a new tyre, I'd do that. I'm pretty sure there will always be a truck driver ready to load me into the back to get to the next city. I'd like to see someone try this with the Burg!!! LOL


It's an important point, BTW, and it extends to other Burgman parts, too. For general punctures, I'll have a repair kit, spare valves, and irons with me, and there will certainly be plenty of tyre shops all along the way, so the issue would have to be total tyre failure or just devastating wear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Godspeed prossett, I’ll be following you for the duration of your journey !

P.S. If you Crowd Source Fund this adventure I’ll buy you a shot of Ouzo
and a beer to wash it down.
Cheers! If you're crazy enough to fly out to Greece at the opportune time, I'd gladly share thoughts and a bottle with you.

Meanwhile, 2nd mod completed 😎

Ejector seat wire - thanks to BurgmanUSA for the advice!

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Cheers! If you're crazy enough to fly out to Greece at the opportune time, I'd gladly share thoughts and a bottle with you.
When I turned legal age to drink I’d go to my local pub and sit with the old timers and I remember a WW2 vet tell me this joke ….

If Russia attacked Turkey from behind do you think Greece would help ?

I would bust out laughing watching him laugh ….

You be careful and try to find a Canadian Flag Patch 🇨🇦 to velcro to your jacket and if anyone asks tell ‘em your from Toronto.😁
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
When I turned legal age to drink I’d go to my local pub and sit with the old timers and I remember a WW2 vet tell me this joke ….

If Russia attacked Turkey from behind do you think Greece would help ?

I would bust out laughing watching him laugh ….

You be careful and try to find a Canadian Flag Patch 🇨🇦 to velcro to your jacket and if anyone asks tell ‘em your from Toronto.😁
😍 funny thing, I was born in Toronto 🇨🇦
 

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2006 Burgman 400 - Silver - 8600 miles - and climbing !
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Yes Godspeed Prossett, keep you safe & sound and enjoying such a great ride adventure.

I like your new Givi AF266 -
Transforms the ride I bet !

I'm looking at a D258ST myself.

You're going 6,000 miles (is that 1 way ?)
Taking tent camping gear ?

My proposed upcoming trip to SoCal will be 1650m each way.

I think I'm crazy....then see your trip and go....maybe NOT so crazy !

Warm Regards - David in Texas

PS: Just test drove after my Dr Pulley 21g Solder + ContraSpring + new belt upgrade.
NOW with the relaxed revs & powerband sweat spot, she finally feels like a Touring mile muncher
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 · (Edited)
Thanks - I read somewhere, but it stuck with me: "Crazy is estimating how long you have left, and doing nothing about it."

Everybody flies - I'm gonna ride!!! :cool:

The GIVI AF266 - superb! It blocks wind to the helmet (I'm 180 cm / 5.9") but somewhow allows for gentle airflow to pass thru my jacket! it's hot here, summer mesh jacket, so airflow is important. Lowering the top screen lets air into the face - great at lower speeds. Overall, super happy. I was worried the tall acrylic might distort vision, or make me miss road details - not at all, no issue whatsoever.

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Yes, one way - I plan to import my Burg into EU upon arrival, and enjoy it in my retirement!

I'm thinking 2 nights camping in between hotels, but if it doesn't feel right I'll just skip the camping. We'll see. In this part of the world, free wild camping is normal and accepted - and totally safe - but you'll have friendly people stop by for the Where you from, Where you going routine, so I'll see how easy I can find secluded off-the-road but not off-road sites to string up a hammock without disturbing or being disturbed. I mean, they mean well, it's not a fear of thievery on my part, it's a reluctance to deal with kind people inviting you to come into their homes "for breakfast", when honestly they really have not much to share. Their hospitality towards visitors is incredible and a real credit to their culture; it's me that is an old grumpy solitary bear, and I'd rather avoid their insistence. Seriously, they invite you in, but it then becomes 1-2 hours of stilted politeness and poor communication over a few dates and sickly sweets, which I don't want to eat in the first place. Though, sometimes they really go all out, and ask their women to prepare a meal, or even butcher a goat and show that they're well-off, or order in a mountain of food. And that will be 3-6-8 hours! And you can't just take a few nibbles and scoot, it's like visiting grandma, except you don't know anybody LOL Still, it's a lovely cultural tradition from an era where traveling was tough, and so guests who made perilous journeys were treated like royalty, so I don't intend to sound unappreciative. On the contrary, I wish I had more time, and could take a year, and travel by camel and donkey. But no, I'm on a metal combustion-engine beast, and speeding through! :)

Once into EU, totally different - wild camping is illegal and nobody invites you in LOOOOL So there I'll be aiming to ask private property owners pretty please if they don't mind me stringing up a hammock with my bike near the outer fence for the night, and I'll be off first thing in the morning. With my white beard and obviously loaded Burgman, I think they'll see I'm just who I say I am, and hopefully they'll agree. Again, we'll see. I can do all motels/hotels/airbnbs if needed. Actually, Europeans are just as kind, just they've been hardened by nasty news and bad experiences with strangers. In the morning, they'll come out with coffee, milk, bread, butter and jams (if you don't attack them in the night, or run off with their daughters). It's when you travel in peace that you find out just how nice people really are.

Anyways, all to be confirmed once I'm actually there. They might all set their dogs on me!

As for the actual camping, I favor a hammock but no cooking: one side tied to the bike so I just need one tree or support - it's faster, less hassle, easy to set up for daytime naps as well, off the ground, more comfortable, and nobody can pinch your bike without waking you up LOOL

Something like this (pic off Google):

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Prossett,

You're a gifted writer and had me laughing my head off your entire post....the descriptions of Middle Eastern hospitality are epic & hilarious.
Ive seen a Vlog last year TOTALLY confirming what you laid out.
To me it's charming & anchoring to know that Traditions based in Universal Values + Philanthropy (Love for others) lives on as a mainstay of many cultures & tribes, even Nations.
That such an encouraging Cultural feature could end up being, in a weird sense, a trap is even more surprising.
With such a grasp ahead of time, you're prepared, clearly.
Thx for the Hammock idea I've been tempted to try it.
Have you done it enough to compare its benefits with a traditional Tent / Air mattress / sleeping bag ?
My main impression is it's for uber Temperate weather only.
Also I'd be one more thing to pack besides tent.

I'd guess speed of deployment is high ?

I was thinking that on my larger SoCal Tour especially, having my quick fill backpacking air mattress & pillow handy I could place on vacant picnic table at rest area for a 60-90 minute recharge, in case of road fatigue.

This is all untested theory to me now.

Any thoughts ?

Cheers - David
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 · (Edited)
Thx for the Hammock idea I've been tempted to try it.
Have you done it enough to compare its benefits with a traditional Tent / Air mattress / sleeping bag ?
My main impression is it's for uber Temperate weather only.
Also I'd be one more thing to pack besides tent.

I'd guess speed of deployment is high ?
Thanks for your kind words :) I do enjoy writing.

I'm a hammock fan, tried and tested, and I sleep wonderfully. So many pros:

  • you're off the ground
  • once you have your straps (tie-downs are perfect) and a good eye for the angle of hang and distance, set up is 30 seconds. Also excellent for a quick getaway: step out, roll it, and you're off!
  • you get in and out elegantly, not crawling on your hands and knees as with a tent
  • much lighter and packs smaller
  • actually, here's a better read: https://wheretheroadforks.com/hammock-vs-tent-camping-pros-and-cons/

But, you raise a good point: I've only done hot and dry weather hammocking... I'm a bit wary of the cold or wet. I'll need to test. I do sometimes string up a tarp over, on its own line, so in theory it should keep me dry. Nice big tarp that you can peg down low (tarp actually is for impromptu privacy, so's camouflaged bird-watchers can't take TikToks of your behind while you're struggling to pull yourself out of a full squat, if you get my drift...)

For cold, they say you place a vapor barrier under you, and it's cozy, but I have my doubts. Hammocks were designed and used in tropical climes - no one's ever heard an Inuit call out to his wife: "Hey A'akukuujjusi, come chill in the hammock with me!" LOOOOL

And you need at least one tree or telephone pole or fence post, plus the backside of a motorcycle 8) Burg looks perfect for the job: big hefty centerstand, and handy grab rail. Some adaptation is required for a low hang. As you'll learn, starting the hammock tie low down, like the height of the Burgman grab rail, you won't get much sag, so there won't be enough height for the tarp to go above - hence I'll need a second tie-point 40-80 cm above the grab rail tie point to tie the ridgeline if rain is expected. I'm thinking the top of the packed stuff on the back of the bike. I'll take some pics when I start testing the Burg on overnight trips.

Here's how a tarp would go over the hammock normally, but note they're tying it up high to start off with. We'd be much lower, if using the grab rail. The ridgeline is also important to hang the bug net, many hammocks come with one. When you don't need it, you just flip the hammock and there's no net anymore. Lastly, consider a big, 2-person hammock, because it will give you space to lie a bit across rather than straight with your back shaped like a banana, and that makes all the difference in comfort. You'll see a hammock pro right away by how they lie slightly off-center 8)

Anyways, it ain't rocket science LOL

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