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Discussion Starter #1
I tore a bunch of tupperware off to run some wiring for a new horn, battery tender harness, and do a better job zip tying the headlight modulator under the cowl. Then I came inside for a beer and found ONE screw in my pocket!!!! R-A-T-S!

I guess tomorrow I tear everything apart again and try an figure out what I missed reassembling all that plastic. And, of course, it will be the last thing I tear off! That's why I like working on my trials bike. Frame, motor, handlebars, wheels, suspension, and ONE piece of plastic that pretends it's a seat.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Been there done that too many times. :oops:;)
If I dropped it in my pocket, I was probably standing, so I suspect it belongs up high on the bike. I just don't remember any silver screws up high. :sad2:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I lucked out. I pulled the dash cover 1st and BINGO. Total time less than 1 minute. Sometimes I luck out.
 

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Been there done that too many times. :oops:;)
Likewise. It haunts me, keeps me awake at 3am wondering where the damned thing belongs. Is my bike going to crash? Or just the CVT! OMG, I gotta find out tomorrow! Maybe now!

Things I learned the hard way:

1. When disassembling a bike, whenever possible put the screw back in the hole that it came from. That way it won't be lost or forgotten.

2. If that's not possible, use baggies. Use a baggie for each major assembly (side panel screws, back wheel parts, etc.) and label each baggie with a felt pen. I know people who actually tape the baggies on the appropriate panel. Again, that way you know where all the screws are for each task, and none of them get lost or forgotten.

3. If you have a smart phone, take pictures as you go along. It's easy and it's free.

4. A service manual is really, really, really useful. So are LeDude's guides. (Thank you, LeDude, for your generous contributions. You've bailed me out more than once!)

5. Don't get lazy. I have two Burgmans and service them myself. I've had them both apart many times. A few weeks ago one was apart for its 25,000 mile overhaul, with all the tupperware off as far back as the seat to service, add dual horns and a power block to the inside the front panel, with appropriate wiring run from the battery.

I got lazy. The bike sat apart for a week waiting on parts, I had all the screws from the LH lower side panel in a metal dish and I kicked it over. It took hours of knee-grinding pain crawling over the concrete floor before I finally found them all. I put the LH tupperware back together the next morning without incident and put the rest of the bike back together the next day. Now I'm damned if I don't have an extra screw...

Regards
Scott Fraser
Calgary
 

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Discussion Starter #7
2. If that's not possible, use baggies. Use a baggie for each major assembly (side panel screws, back wheel parts, etc.) and label each baggie with a felt pen. I know people who actually tape the baggies on the appropriate panel. Again, that way you know where all the screws are for each task, and none of them get lost or forgotten.

YUP! Did that today when I went in to add a horn. Plus I jotted a note on what and where it went. I make a lot of mistakes, but I try to make each one only once.:p
 

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An old(er) muffin pan works great. If you can find the twelve muffin pan you'll have enough for just about any job.
If you glue a magnet at the botton it will hold anything steel and just drop a small piece of paper in the hole with what/where these came from and your good to go!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
An old(er) muffin pan works great. If you can find the twelve muffin pan you'll have enough for just about any job.
If you glue a magnet at the botton it will hold anything steel and just drop a small piece of paper in the hole with what/where these came from and your good to go!
Great idea. Thanks. I'll try it. I have a 12 cup muffin tin that I'm not using.
 

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I like to use old egg cartons, you can close the lid and try to keep everything from jumping out and heading for freedom. I also use the camera and sometimes I will draw out the part on cardboard and screw the screws into the cardboard according to where they belong on the piece.
 

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I like to use old egg cartons, you can close the lid and try to keep everything from jumping out and heading for freedom. I also use the camera and sometimes I will draw out the part on cardboard and screw the screws into the cardboard according to where they belong on the piece.
Never thought of that. That's a very good idea. Kudos.

Regards
Scott Fraser
 

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I guess I am a little more relaxed than most of you. If I have an extra screw left after working on my bike, it goes into one of several little bins I have on the bottom part of my roll around toolbox. That way it will be easily found if I discover I need it. If I am missing a screw or bolt when I go to put my bike together, the toolbox is the first place I look. If the needed screw/bolt isn't there, I make a run to my local Diamond Screw dealer to get another. If it is a speciality screw/bolt then I place an order with my dealer. Helps to keep my blood pressure down and I have never had a failure on a motorcycle after putting one back together. But then again, I only work on my own bikes.

Namaste'
Doug in Kentucky
 
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