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Discussion Starter #1
On the weekends I usually take a 150-200 mile ride to wherever, as long as I can get a cold drink and some fuel it doesn't matter where I go or where I turnaround at. I live in a very sparsely populated area of SW Georgia, my town has about 75k but I can leave my house and in 5 minutes be 'lost in the country'.

I had a phone call from a friend of mine who is now a manager for the US Park Service and they are in charge of a seldom visited park that's off the beaten path. I usually go there 1-2 times a year when they update displays but it's always a somber visit. I drove up there today, a wonderful day for a ride, The National Prisoner of War museum is located in Andersonville, GA about an hour north of where I live. The Andersonville Civil War Prison is there though there isn't much left but a field, monuments erected by northern states, a national cemetery, and the museum.

The museum is one of the smallest in the park service but is very moving to visit. Displays begin with the revolutionary war and there are displays from every era. It's emotional to see the recreation of a Viet Cong prison cell from the Hanoi Hilton and this is coming from someone who was never in the military.

I tried to enter the military in the late 70's after high school but broke my leg before induction. At that time there wasn't much demand for soldiers so I was passed on by every branch after I healed. I've worked multiple contracts overseas for the military at a variety of bases for the Army and the Air Force and have a deep respect for those were served, whether they were in harms way or not, they served our nation.

My friend who works there has always wondered why so few people visit the museum, it's out in the middle of nowhere but a beautiful drive from I-75. If you have a chance to visit and are passing through the area. Give it a visit, it is both informational and emotional to do so.
 

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Any Civil War buff would know about the Andersonville prisoner of war camp and how harsh the conditions were during the war. Not much better in the Northern camps either. The Union would not authorize a prisoner exchange with the south so cramp conditions and lack of food available due to fighting caused overcrowding, disease and starvation. Neither side had a plan to deal with the huge amount of prisoners over the length of the war. People originally signed up for 90 days when the war started thinking it would not last that long.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Any Civil War buff would know about the Andersonville prisoner of war camp and how harsh the conditions were during the war. Not much better in the Northern camps either. The Union would not authorize a prisoner exchange with the south so cramp conditions and lack of food available due to fighting caused overcrowding, disease and starvation. Nether side had a plan to deal with the huge amount of prisoners over the length of the war. People originally signed up for 90 days when the war started thinking it would not last that long.
You nailed it, I'm a amateur military historian and know a lot but many people who LIVE here don't even know what it's about. Fascinating historical site. Thank you for commenting.
 

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I was fortunate enough to be in Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon) in 2018 (wife is VN - born just after the war and it was her 25th annual HS reunion). While I was there, I went to the Vietnamese War Museum. This covers the war with the perspective from the Vietnamese side. Though, curiously, nearly all combat and support equipment on display (and there was a lot) was American. They also had examples of the captivity accommodations from both perspectives - those managed by North Vietnam and those used by the US. Also a somber / sobering place to visit.
Thanks for enlightening me to the existence of your museum - if I'm in the area....
 
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I was fortunate enough to be in Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon) in 2018 (wife is VN - born just after the war and it was her 25th annual HS reunion). While I was there, I went to the Vietnamese War Museum. This covers the war with the perspective from the Vietnamese side. Though, curiously, nearly all combat and support equipment on display (and there was a lot) was American. They also had examples of the captivity accommodations from both perspectives - those managed by North Vietnam and those used by the US. Also a somber / sobering place to visit.
Thanks for enlightening me to the existence of your museum - if I'm in the area....
I've worked overseas a lot of my professional career and was able to visit Vietnam also. I was able to speak to many who fought for the then, North Vietnamese. Every single one of them said they had absolutely no hate against the US or the American soldiers who were there, they just wanted to be left alone by the French and Americans and live their lives. So as usual, it was the old men on both sides who had little to lose making decisions while the boys who had yet to live their lives, being the ones who bled and died...So sad for both sides...
 

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Just to say that your boys over here are still remembered. I have visited the American Airmen's Cemetary in Cambridge, and it overwhelmed me. Even tho' I knew not one of them.

On a different level, the village of Aldbourne still has memories of your 101st Airbourne. I have the books "Band Of Brothers" (Steven Ambrose), and Richard Winter's sequal. The Post Office where he was billeted is still there, but now offers Teas. The Crown pub has a room dedicated to the 101st, done with respect, no commercialism. (The boys used to enjoy a beverage there).
Cambridge American Airmen's Cemetary.jpg Aldbourne Post Office.jpg The Crown Aldbourne.jpg Beyond band Of Brothers.jpg Easy Company Picture.jpg
 

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Although I was AF, as a member of the air support operation (TACP/ALO) I had the privilege to wear the 101st Division's Screaming Eagle while stationed with, and assigned to them at Fort Campbell. Even graduated from Air Assault school and earned my Bullwinkle Badge.

A special place in my heart for the Division. Nice to know they're still remembered fondly.
 
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