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I see two distinct threads here so I'm just gonna talk about the FD. The metal on the magnet will not "wash out" as you are making more as you ride. You have a failed bearing somewhere that is disintegrating. You can tear it down now and save being stuck somewhere or wait until it really tears stuff up. Worse case is actually the rear wheel locking up at speed and you fishtailing your unwitting happy tail into the ambulance. I base my opinion on almost fifty years as a millwright and heavy equipment mechanic seeing more and varied gearboxes and how they fail than most people can imagine. Happy Motoring.
 

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The vacuum tubing holds it pretty snug in the original holes with very little flexing and it's due to the radius of the tubing.
 
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I took the butt-bumper off and have rode around some. I can't say that I like it too much more than with it on. I'm use to my knees being close from small cars. And it looks mo' bettuh with the bumper on.
Funny that’s odd.....I’m a coupe inches shy of 6’ and I found removing the Butt Block night and day different for rear end real estate. No harm no foul slide it back in.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Daris, my proportions are a bit out of whack. I'm longer in the back than I am in the legs. It's why I don't have leg room issues, but do have HORRIBLE wind noise issues. And is why I ordered the barn door front windshield.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I see two distinct threads here so I'm just gonna talk about the FD. The metal on the magnet will not "wash out" as you are making more as you ride. You have a failed bearing somewhere that is disintegrating. You can tear it down now and save being stuck somewhere or wait until it really tears stuff up. Worse case is actually the rear wheel locking up at speed and you fishtailing your unwitting happy tail into the ambulance. I base my opinion on almost fifty years as a millwright and heavy equipment mechanic seeing more and varied gearboxes and how they fail than most people can imagine. Happy Motoring.
bcalan: I don't mind my threads getting torn off in different directions. Your post was perfect. And I'm tending to believe what you say. I also heard Dave when he talked about the rear axle bearing being exposed to FD lubrication, and it could be the problem. I hate to tear it down because it means no riding (although I could ride the mighty Rebel). And a project like that, might take me a long time. It rides good enough, and the noise I hear sounds just like what I expect from straight cut gears. I guess I'm going to have to go search through LeDude's videos to see what kind of project I'm looking at.
 

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Thanks. Let me be clear about a rear wheel lockup. It will suddenly stop turning and skid pretty much out of control. In a straight line you will come to tire howling, flat spotting stop. The driver behind you will have no brake light warning him and may run you over. In a corner when you are leaned over the bike with the rear wheel locked will stand up straight and go in a rather straight line off the road, or worse high side you off like a rag doll, or even worse in a right hander will put you into oncoming traffic. The lesser evil is the bearing will seize and the whole thing will rotate in the housing it's mounted in. This may ruin the transmission case or wheel itself. When the rollers or balls in the bearing wear small enough one may come out of its race and jam into the gear teeth. The thought in your head that "Ahhh, it'll be all right" is called complacency. Complacency is that happy feeling you get just before you realize that everything is not all right.
Nuf Sed on this topic. Happy Motoring.
 

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bcalan ,

Your warning reminded me of a song....

 

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Discussion Starter #28
bcalan - I'm well aware of what rear wheel lockup is, what it does, and how it would effect a ride. I roadraced motorcycles back in the late 90's. I personally have experienced, low sides, high sides, rear wheel wheelies, "backing it in" to corners, sliding on asphalt at over 100 mph, leaning from left to right (and vice-versa) with the front wheel off the ground at near 150 mph as measured by a speed camera at Road Atlanta, tumbling across asphalt out of control, being knocked unconscious from crashing (at St. Louis International Raceway), and of course braking a bone or two. I'm well versed. I looked back in this thread and did not see anywhere that I wrote "Ahhh, it'll be all right." I don't remember thinking that either. And last I heard, it was impossible for you to be able to know the thoughts that go through others heads.

Seems like I remember saying, "I'm going to have to go search through LeDude's videos to see what kind of project I'm looking at." I'm not sure what made you imply I said or thought, "Ahh, it'll be all right." I'm also aware of what complacency is. It's kind of the opposite of considering taking action to rectify a problem before it gets worse, as stated in the quoted sentence just prior.

And if anyone else may have any comments, questions, suggestions or concerns on this topic, MORE POWER TO YA! I welcome anything you have to say!

Keep the rubber side down!
 

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I guess I misunderstood.... I'll go "help" someone else now. I hope you're riding more carefully these days. ;0
 

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Discussion Starter #30
I don't have a service manual. Perhaps I will invest in one soon. And I've been looking for instructions on getting up under the FD cover and have not had any luck.

I'm wondering, can I take the plastic cover off, drain the FD, then just start removing the FD cover bolts and remove it? Or is there more to it? I just want to inspect and see what I might find looking bad up under there. Maybe it would be obvious why I'm getting the mushroom heads of metal.
 

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After you take the plastic cover off there are a lot of bolts to remove, 17 of them. The axle must come out too.

Final drive gears.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter #32
If there are not obvious indications of wear on the gear teeth, then I'm not likely to notice anything unless I pull those gears out. Those gears look like they will just slide out, except the left most, it has a c-clip. And I have a c-clip tool. Question is: Do those gears just slide out once the outer housing is removed as shown in the picture?
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I'm back on the backrest project for now. I have found some Aluminum 6061-T6 tubing, 5/8" o.d. by 3/8" i.d. A foot of it for $10. I don't know if I'll need two 1 foot pieces or not.

I'll need to drill it open a skosh but that should be easy enough. I only need to remove about 0.020. I'll drill it out to a 13/32 drill bit size. And then I think I could insert the seat rods and tach weld them in. Then paint the seat rods and tubes black. Uncle Fester's idea to bend the headrest rods with a jack handle is a good idea.
 

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You can not weld steel to alumumn but JB Weld will.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
I've got the aluminum tubing now. 1 foot seems to be perfect, to cut in half and use on each side. And the fit of the tube up into the seat holes is P-E-R-F-E-C-T. I'm going to bring the aluminum tube to work and open the I.D. up ever so slightly. I should be able to open it to 0.010" greater than the Isuzu headrest stays. That's a 0.005" gap all around. Sounds really good. And even though aluminum and steel ain't posa weld together, I think I will arc to the steel and let steel weld material ooze over onto the aluminum, just to see what I get. Might be nothing. Might be ugly.

But it's probably best to JB Weld it first, as I know Dave, you are right. And if I had to, I could drill a really cute little hole through both the tube and rod, then whomp a roll pin through said holes. After that I will paint and stain.

My problem is this: I don't know where to start the bends on the Isuzu headrest stays. The Warden helped me with the angle last night. Seems pretty straight forward.

But as far as starting the bends, ideally I want the backrest up as high as possible. But with too little intrusion of the bar into the tube, it might feel shackley (which is a redneck term my mother would use in place of cheap, unsturdy, low quality, etc). And excessive intrusion will have the backrest sitting lower than I'd prefer.

Dave - you have one of these jewels. Is it possible to measure from the bottom surface of the headrest down the very first noticeable trace of bar bending? And if possible, from the free end of the headrest bar back to the first trace of bar bending (however, that free end might be permanently mounted inside a tube so you may not be able to measure from it).

Thanks!
 
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