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Discussion Starter #1
Well, the dealer literally just called and said my 05 650 just came in the door! It's decision time even as I type!

I've never ridden anything with two wheels except a bicycle, but have wanted a m/c for a long time. As an older new rider, I decided to go with the 650 for it's ease, storage and size. ( I'm 6'5", 240 lbs )

My question is..........

1) How well does the safety course prepare a newbie for handling a scooter ( I start my course in two weeks ) and

2) How crazy would I be to drive the scooter home and park it until the school starts? The dealer is about ten minutes from my house, with only suburban roads and no highways to run on. I have taken the written test and have my permit, but no license until after the school. Massachusetts allows solo, daylight operation on a permit.


Hmmm?????

Bill
 

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The 650 is a lot of bike for those that have Never ridden anything.

I would take the course 1st.

Use their bike, it has less power, which is good for starting out. Plus you may drop it. Better theirs than yours. They probably have a standard bike with a clutch, good thing to master anyway. Driving both has very simular mechanics. The real difference will be the clutch with gears. If you use their bike, don't drive yours it untill you are done with the course. You will get confused with the controls being different.
If you use your's, be very carefull when you drive your 650. Some have taken their new 650's for the course and did ok, but I don't recommend it.

Ideal'y, ride something smaller for a while 1st.
 

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Bill said:
2) How crazy would I be to drive the scooter home and park it until the school starts? The dealer is about ten minutes from my house, with only suburban roads and no highways to run on. I have taken the written test and have my permit, but no license until after the school. Massachusetts allows solo, daylight operation on a permit.
I was in exactly the same situation as you. I have my learners but my course doesn't start until June and I took delivery of my Burgman last week. Luckily, enough, my dealership offers free delivery anywhere in BC and they dropped it off to me no problem (they're only 10 min away).

I contemplated riding it back, but I'm glad I didn't. There's just too many "new" things to get used to, new helmet, new jacket, new environment, new vehicle--yes, the burg is really easy to ride (now that I've practiced a while) but that first day I think would have been too overwhelming. Why take the excitement of getting the Burgman and risk something bad happening, just for the sake of being excited about it?

Also, our insurance company voids all coverage if you aren't licenced properly and get into an accident. If anything happened, I would not be covered (for injuries or property) at all.
 

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Don't drive yours it untill you are done with the course. You will get confused with the controls being different.
I agree!
Although I'm pretty confident you would do fine is it really worth the risk? Even if nobody got hurt and you just dropped the 650 or ran it into a stop sign or whatever would you have major regrets afterwards? I would.
And if the worst happened and someone got hurt? I would much rather see you ride home a scooter than a m/c however, is it really worth the risk? You are sinking a lot of money into the bike. Be sure you protect yourself and others by being confident (safety course), safe (safety course), secure (insured for accidents/medical/liability/theft/etc.).
Best way you can be happy and ride your new 650 for a very long time is wait JUST A LITTLE longer and take the safety course! You are guarenteed to have fewer regrets.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Everyone's saying what I already figured, but sometimes you need to hear it from other folks! I think I will have it delivered to my house. I can spend my time memorizing control positions and learning the mechanical ins and outs of the machine.

If nothing else, after getting polished and staying un-ridden for two weeks...................it sure will be shiny when it does go on the road!!!!!


Thanks all!

Bill
 

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Good decision Bill!

Be patient - it will be difficult and you will be tempted. Good luck with the course!
 

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As Norman suggested in another thread, you'll have time to implement a fire control solution while you wait! Although I think I would go with the old forcefield bug-zapper myself as I think I'd get more use out of it.
 

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Tall

Did you say you were 6'5"? I'm 6'1" and if I were any taller my knees would be hitting the glove box. Make sure you test it out and see how well the fit is before you have it delivered.

I know there are some seat mods out there and the Burgy is worth the extra $$$ to make it fit, especially for a first time motorcycle rider.

Other than that, I think you will do fine learning on it. Like they said, take the course, then just take it slow. Once you get a feel for it I'm sure you will adjust.

~Tom
 

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The problem of getting a bit mixed up on controls was mentioned above -- the whole deal with the clutch lever on a motorcycle being a brake on a scooter. But there's something else to consider. I took the MSF class before riding any motorcycle, and learned about the 'squeeze' and 'ease' of using the clutch. I got used to doing the slow-speed maneuvers while feathering the clutch. But when you switch to a scooter, I think you have to re-learn the slow speed maneuvers. I recently rode a B400 belonging to 'ekp' here on this board (thanks, Eric!) and found doing U-turns to be a bit tricky. I'm used to giving it just a little bit of gas and then feathering the clutch, but with a scooter I had to rev it up to 3000rpm before the automatic clutch engaged. This was a weird feeling coming from a motorcycle. Bottom line, it'd be best to do a bit of slow-speed tooling around before doing much riding on a new scoot.
 

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frugality wrote (snipped)
I got used to doing the slow-speed maneuvers while feathering the clutch. But when you switch to a scooter, I think you have to re-learn the slow speed maneuvers
Very true, You learn the "feel" of the bike, were to look, controlling your balance. But without that clutch to "feather" it does become a little different.
Most "old timers" will tell you give a little gas, hold it , and control your speed with the hand brake. Like anything else you need to learn how and practice. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Of course all this now begs the question...............should a new riders first purchase after completing a safety course be a m/c or a scooter???


Hmmmm?

Bill
 

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Bill said:
Of course all this now begs the question...............should a new riders first purchase after completing a safety course be a m/c or a scooter???


Hmmmm?

Bill
A scooter of course!

Geez. What kind of answer did you think you'd get on this forum? :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Tom.....

Luckily my height is in my torso. It's tight on a 400, but I have a 2-3 inches of knee room on the 650 and thats w/o removing the seat back.

Another quick question for the acknowledged masters of scootery ( is there such a word????) that reside at BurgmanUSA. If a Burgman is essentially in 'Neutral' at speeds below 7mph, what is required when a Burg is taking off from a standhill on an uphill grade ? If the Burg is accelerated on take-off does this result in a 'slamming' of the machine into its gear?

Please forgive in advance the potential of a stupid question on the part of a new rider. ( to be)


Bill
 

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No slam, Bill. Smooth as silk.

It'll be well worth the wait.

Steve

Gear up!
 

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Bill,

The transmission is not "out of gear". There is an automatic clutch ahead of the transmission. At 7 mph the clutch disengages. When you twist the throttle, the clutch engages. The engagement is smooth as silk like Steve said.
 

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You will notice the clutch starting to engage around 1800 rpms approximately. It is very smooth, no jerkiness.
 

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Bill said:
Tom.....

If a Burgman is essentially in 'Neutral' at speeds below 7mph, what is required when a Burg is taking off from a standhill on an uphill grade ?

Bill
It's not really in neutral but the transmission is at rest or disingaged untill it reaches a certain rpm's "hold the left brake lever in to keep it from rolling backwards and then accelerate with your right hand untill you feel the transmission trying to engage and then release the left brake lever and go. :lol:
 

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Bill said:
...Another quick question for the acknowledged masters of scootery...If a Burgman is essentially in 'Neutral' at speeds below 7mph, what is required when a Burg is taking off from a standhill on an uphill grade ? If the Burg is accelerated on take-off does this result in a 'slamming' of the machine into its gear?
Ditto what the others have said. Also, it's important to smoothly roll on the throttle. With a conventional M/C you can just crank the throttle up to a certain point, and use smooth clutch release to prevent lurching; on the Burgman it's all in the throttle.

Same with coming to a smooth stop; plan ahead, and roll off the throttle gradually, using the engine braking (very pronounced on AN650s) until down to slow speed and then apply brakes for the final stop.

HTH.
 

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Re: Tall

kcburgman said:
Did you say you were 6'5"? I'm 6'1" and if I were any taller my knees would be hitting the glove box.
I'm 6' 5" too, with a 37 inch inseam. (I'm all arms and legs.)

My knees brushed the glove box at first, but now that the seat is broken in I have room unless I try to put my knees too close together (like on cold days when I'm trying to get more out of the wind). Overall it's not a problem, but I probably will get a custom seat on this Burgman or my next one (depending on when I get a new one).
 

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The whole leg and glovebox thing for the vertically enhanced is quite neat (as long as there is not too much interference) as you are able to make a three point brace:

1. Feet on the footboards.
2. Butt against the.............butt stop.
3. Knees against the glovebox area.

In many ways those making the transistion from a traditional m/c wonder how they will be able to cope without a tank to caress their inner thighs.

I prefer the lardy and with the above description you do not sit on the Lardy or even sit on the Lardy but rather you become part of the Lardy! :lol: :lol:
 
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