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Just received a video from joe_90 (Steve L) who was about to fit a new timing chain tensioner to his 650. He had already ordered the parts. When he started the strip down he found that his chain will also need replacing so that part is now on order. Anyway, here's a brief video of what he found.

http://youtu.be/Qqk2b7oE-28

To be continued.
 

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Holy cow, could one of the camshafts be missing in that video?!! They'll actually run with that much slop in the cam timing?!
 

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I am interested to see how this works out.

Does the engine need to be removed, and the case split to replace the cam chain ??
 

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Does the engine need to be removed, and the case split to replace the cam chain ??
I don't have the manual in the house to check it but shouldn't have to. The lower sprocket is behind the starter clutch so you should be able to access it by just removing the starter clutch cover.
 

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Yup, bad tensioner. Also a bad cam chain for sure if he has been riding it that way. I am surprised that the bike was still running before he tore into it. I have a friend who had a bike that ate cam chains along with their tensioners. We got good at changing them while he had that bike. Someone did him a favor and stole the bike.

Namaste'
Doug in Kentucky
 

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thanks for posting the vid for me steve as i am a bit of teck fobe i have got the chain out and ordered a new one £115 sterling looks like you have to remove bottom chain guide to get the chain out and from what i can see you are supposed to remove the cylinder head to get the guide out but did just get it passed the guide hope i can new one back in will let you know how i get on.
 

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I have a friend who had a bike that ate cam chains along with their tensioners. We got good at changing them while he had that bike. Someone did him a favor and stole the bike.

I bet the bike was a Honda from the 70's - CB360?
 

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I bet the bike was a Honda from the 70's - CB360?
Yes, it was a Honda. A dual-sport 1987 (I think) 250cc. Don't remember what the bike was called (I would have to call him to find out) but the thing ate cam chains and tensioners every thousand to ten thousand miles. Crap design on Honda's part IMHO. Had to adjust the valves on it every thousand miles. We were told by the Honda dealer that the engine was the same as Honda was running on their 4-stroke motocross race bikes.

Namaste'
Doug in Kentucky
 

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yes ledude have seen that link thats why i got a tensoner in the first place but the old tensoner looks fine but it was ajusted all the way out so i think the chain is stretched will hold it up to the new one when it get here and let you all know.
 

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yes ledude have seen that link thats why i got a tensoner in the first place but the old tensoner looks fine but it was ajusted all the way out so i think the chain is stretched will hold it up to the new one when it get here and let you all know.
Check that tensioner closely if you plan on reusing it. I have always changed the tensioner when I changed a cam chain. Was not interested in having to tear into the engine again if the used tensioner failed a little later.

Namaste'
Doug in Kentucky
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Update:
Well, the chain is sorted now but Steve was pulling what little hair he had out just trying to get it to start. Using the Suzuki repair manual, he timed the chain up as per the manual. It just wouldn't start. He had compression, fuel and a spark. Wouldn't even cough or backfire. Fortunately he had made his own timing marks before strip down which was just ONE tooth different from the manual. He set it to his marks and it started straight away! Anyway, he's a happy bunny again. Even reckons it actually sounds like a Japanese bike engine now instead of an Italian one!!
Here's a couple of video's - excuse his French and suggested action for the Japanese author of the manual. :rolleyes: :grin:
Video of chain alignment http://youtu.be/4FLRDEVwVzs
Video of running engine http://youtu.be/rm4DzYxzK_0
Discuss!
 

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Wonderful. I can forgive the cute/funny "jinglish" in the manual (my favorite, page 3-30, "Valve rapper set" which is what one uses to lap valves) but technical errors, NOT!
 

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Interesting, when I had the head off mine I put the chain back on exactly according to the manual instructions. Had no problems. Bike started right up.
 

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this does worry me buffalo as my bike would not start on the 15 pin setting and it does not ride different apart from the noise is now gone and if i have time i will set it back to 15 pins but you now how much work this is as no access to the crank mark without removing lots of plastic whitch is bad planing on suzukis part but just would not fire on suzukis settings.ps thanks for steve d for hosting the vids as i am a bit of a tech fobe
 

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I would leave it alone if it is running good. It may just be that the cam gear was installed a little off on your exhaust cam so the alignment is one tooth different.

It's always a good idea to mark the location before you take it apart like you did. That way you are sure to get it back right even if there is a variance from what the manual says.
 
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