Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,489 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The main point of this thread is that after 62K miles my original clutch and housing seem to be pristine. The interior of the housing is polished to a mirror finish. Couldn't be shinier and my clutches have a nice shiny smooth finish as well. Both look like they'll outlast the scooter. I did have some shudder at about 20/25K and again at 39K (second time was my own ineptitude screwing up the variator) but for the last 13K it has been ultra smooth. I think my impromptu glop layer (third paragraph) has really kept the belt dust down and in turn really made a difference in my scooter transmission experience.

About 12-13K into the new belt, the plates are pretty smooth with very little wear.

I guess I put a little extra grease on the driven plate and spiral torque thingy (I believe that is the technical term) cause I had a pretty nice layer of crud that looked like it was sprayed on the inside of the transmission cover. On the plus side, this sprayed on grease layer seems to have given the belt dust a place to live cause other than that area, the plates and transmission cover were really clean. I have never seen such clean variator and sliders.

I totally rounded a hanger pin on the rear brake while removing the rear caliper. Since my rear rotor thickness is 0.17in at the rim and 0.115in at the center (about a .055in difference or 1.3 mm) it tends to make for a nice wedge to prevent removing the caliper. I was despairing over the hanger pin and googled methods to remove stripped hex bolts. Came across a Merc Benz site where a mechanic swore by TORX and 12 point bits for removing stripped hex bolts. The hanger pin is a 5mm hex and my smallest 12 point was 6mm which turned out to be perfect. A couple of persuasive taps from my sledge and the hex bolt came free. I'll be much more careful when messing with the hanger pins in the future. Not sure what my plan C was going to be (the 12 point was plan B).

I'm looking forward to putting in an exhaust muffler coupling since mine has been gone for 30-40K now. I Seem to remember the scooter being quieter when I first got it.

I almost forgot what started this whole adventure. Needed a new rear tire which went on with no issue at all. Sadly, after 16 tires in 6 years, I'm getting pretty good with spoons. This rear tire looks like it will require 35 gms of wheel weights. I couldn't find an indicator on the tire for the light spot so I just threw it on the rim. Marc Parnes does the rest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
Good job.
I modded my case to get more air in and out, and noticed much less belt dust at its regular R&R cleanings. Clutch is still good at 22,000 miles. A hit with some emery paper once in a while seems to help. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
Good to hear this man, I am at 48k now myself and feel the same way. Everything in the driveline is original including the rollers and all was in good shape at my last belt change. Other than my recent starter button failure I've nothing to complain about on this bike. It just goes and goes and goes......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,489 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
In preparation for my new rotor arriving tonight I figured I'd pull the front wheel, check the balance and brakes. Balance hasn't changed a bit since I mounted the tire which kind of surprised me. I do notice some flat spots on the left side of the tire. A precursor to cupping so the City Grips are not immune. It's interesting in that it is not an even wear band on the left but every other tread block.

As for front brakes, the last set I put on were ebay cheapos, around $30 for 2 fronts and the rear. This time I got EBC. I can tell the difference immediately on cursory inspection. The pad material is close to double the thickness (which I would equate roughly to life). The cheapos lasted around 12-13K. My OEM lasted about 45K.

I would attribute my rear brake rotor wear to leaving my rear brake pads on until there was NO pad material left. While the substrate will stop the bike, running with this degree of wear will give you the chance to shop around for rotors. And if you get to the point, like me, where your rotor is thicker at the outer radius and thinner towards the center, you will have a difficult time removing your rear tire. I don't know what the service limits are on the rotor, perhaps I could have gotten it trued. I'm pretty sure the 2.9 mm thickness towards the center was close to the limit.

I looked at a bunch of different rotor from various manufacturers. If cycle gear stocked an aftermarket rotor I would have gone ahead and got one of those. The fact that no one in Tampa seems to stock parts freed me up to go ahead and just order an OEM replacement. Since I was ordering hanger pins and a muffler coupler (its been 30K+ since I had one) I went ahead and stuck the rotor on that order as well. Theoretically, if I had ordered from the local stealer, I could have had my parts a week ago so I've gone a week driving to work cold turkey. On the plus side, if I have to drive, this seemed to be the week to do it. Rain everyday and in a fashion that I would have been in it pretty much everyday.

With any luck I'll be back on the road tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
Rain in FL?!?! Yup, I live in lower Alabama and it keeps missing us. Y'all must be mildewed by now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,489 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Lets see... (all values are Kmiles)

Sliders - 7 (20gm as it was available locally), 52 (18gm) - about $60 per

Belts - 22, 39, 52 (incumbent destructed) about $145 per

Variator - 39, 52 (w/seals this time) about $120 per
Driven plates - 52 (w/seals, bearings, O-rings) about $240

Rear tires - 12 (Michelin PP), 23 cords showing (Michelin PP), 32 incumbent picked up a screw (Michelin CG), 41 (Michelin CG), 51 (Michelin CG), 62 (Michelin CG) about $55 per
Front tires - 18 (Michelin PP), 33 incumbent picked up a nail (OEM), 51 (Michelin CG) $60 (Michelin) - $140 (OEM)

Front leg shield - 38 minor at fault rear ender about $525

Brake pads rear - 22 no pad left (ebay junk), 38 no pad left (ebay junk), 45 no pad left (ebay junk), 62 (EBC HH) about $10 (ebay junk) or $25 (EBC HH)
Brake pads front - 31 (ebay junk), 62 (EBC HH) about $15 (ebay junk) or $60 (EBC HH)
Brake rotor rear - 62 (OEM) note - wearing your pads to the substrate is hard on your rotor cost about $100

Oil every 3.5 and filter every 7

Having to mess with rear tires every 6 months is kind of a PITA but I haven't been able to convince myself to darkside. After each tire change I swear I'll darkside the next time but when it comes time to buy a tire I always wimp out.

So my total maintenance costs after 62K and 3 years:
Parts - $2100 (includes shipping and about $750 of self induced expenses)
Tires - rear $330, front (includes one stealer emergency replacement and retail OEM) $370


So the total is right around $2800 after 3 years and 62K. Of that around $2K is really required. Which argues persuasively for DaveJ's argument that a well purchased 650 is no more expensive than a 400. The difference in gas cost is probably $200 per year. This is me doing all my own maintenance (and making all my own mistakes). I've probably purchased $150 in special tools mostly big a$$ sockets, variator tool, and tire changing stuff. Add labor costs and you're probably close to $4K. Still my amortized cost of ownership seems to be around (includes initial purchase, insurance, maintenance, gas and riding apparel) $0.20 per mile of which $.013 per mile is self induced.

You could do as well with a well purchased econobox getting 30 mpg but I would hate myself if I did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Great info. The 650 argument only holds true if you don't have CVT problems. For me, 650 not even close in value plus doesn't ride as good and less mileage.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top