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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a 2013 Burgman 400 a little over a year ago. I absolutely loved it. I carried it on the back of a Prevost Bus all over the country. Drove it around 5K miles out west in Wyoming, Montana, S.D. And New Mexico and Texas. The only modification I made was putting on a givi windscreen. It was totally unbelievable how it changed the comfort for the better. I still felt like I wanted just a little more bike for the highway. My Burgman 400 had a total of 500 miles on it when I bought it. It was just like brand new. With about 5500 miles on it. I stumbled on a great deal on a 2018 650 executive with just 1700 miles on it. I bought it. The windscreen was not enough so I have ordered the Clearview extra large windscreen with vent to try and get the same result in the change of wind flow I had on my 400.
The difference between the two bikes is drastic. I had read on this forum that many liked the 400 just as well or better. For zipping around town and running errands etc. the 400 is perfect. For going on a road trip there is no comparison. The difference in power and the integrity of the suspension is immense. The only thing I don’t like so far about the 650 is its lack of tie downs. It is nearly impossible to get this thing tied down on a carrier. There is nothing to hook to. Any suggestions are certainly more than welcome. The 400 had welded loops on the frame near the rear that were awesome. The 650 has nothing. I spent hours tying it down. I wound up using the rider handles, the handle bars, and around the wheels. It sufficed but was not ideal. I love this 650, anyone have any ideas on tying it down? For this reason alone I liked the 400 better. They are both awesome machines and fun to ride. They look amazingly similar, I think if you stuck a 650 sticker on the 400, very few would notice the difference. Size wise they are near identical.
 

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Good reading your comments on the two Models I just bought a 2018 Burgman 650, I drove home, over 80 miles from the dealership in the rain and was absolutely blown away by its handling and speed on the highway. I have not tried to trailer it yet, but I will look around for ideas on how to so,(what do you think about getting a toy hauler?) Good luck.
 

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The 650 and many bikes today are difficult to tie down properly due to the amount of plastic covering their every surface. I have had to trailer mine one time and that was from the dealership where I purchased it new to my home. About a four hour haul. My method for tying down is to use the fork legs to hold it vertical and use the rear wheel to hold it from moving front to back or laterally. I have never been a fan of using the handlebars. It is too easy to damage things like heated grips and any other wire or hoses in the area. It is too easy to put more stress on those then they were ever designed for. Same with the grab bars by the seat. They would be subject to failing if you pull the strap too tight. I also prefer to not load the suspension up with the straps by pulling down on the body or frame. I'm sure there are plenty of methods that will work so you will need to put it in or on the trailer and try to do what seems right to you. If in doubt, throw another strap on it.
 

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i agree with Blacktruck. Trailer is the ultimate answer, especially if you are hauling with a Prevost. And with the proper trailer you could haul both machines around if you wished.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Canyon Dancer is What I used for the handlebars. It is still a lot of stress as these are not true motorcycle handlebars. I don’t like pulling something when I am already driving a 45 foot bus. The real problem is the 400 was a snap to haul. The 650 not so much although I love it more than the 400. I did not use the forks in the front but that will be my next move.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Since it is already a 45 foot bus I have avoided pulling something else. We like to tour more than camp. We stop in the national parks like Yellowstone take the bike off, do about 50 miles and put it back on and move down the road. The hitch hauler has worked awesome. The 400 was so easy to load And tie down. Literally a five minute job. Of course the more times you do it the easier it gets. I have a 1500 pound hitch capacity. The issue is the tiedown points on the bike. They’re just really are not any there. If anyone has any pictures of the their tie down process please post them! Thanks to all.
 

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Any good weld shop should be able to cobble up some 'D' ring tabs on the bike for ya. If you were here in Washington State we could do it this weekend.



Using the Canyon Dancer bar tie downs should only be a secondary stabilizing fix. Heres a picture of a buddys 650's handel bars after using Canyon Dancer's and 1 strap in the rear. He's truck hit a deep pot hole and the 650 laid over and busted up a few things.
Canyon Dancer damage.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Any good weld shop should be able to cobble up some 'D' ring tabs on the bike for ya. If you were here in Washington State we could do it this weekend.



Using the Canyon Dancer bar tie downs should only be a secondary stabilizing fix. Heres a picture of a buddys 650's handel bars after using Canyon Dancer's and 1 strap in the rear. He's truck hit a deep pot hole and the 650 laid over and busted up a few things.
View attachment 83423
Oh wow, that is definitely not good. I’m going to have to work on it some more. The hitch hauler I have is the black widow. I can’t believe there are not more choices.
 

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Any good weld shop should be able to cobble up some 'D' ring tabs on the bike for ya. If you were here in Washington State we could do it this weekend.



Using the Canyon Dancer bar tie downs should only be a secondary stabilizing fix. Heres a picture of a buddys 650's handel bars after using Canyon Dancer's and 1 strap in the rear. He's truck hit a deep pot hole and the 650 laid over and busted up a few things.
View attachment 83423
Was the front wheel in a wheel chock, or just on the deck?
 

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Thanks! Was trying to figure out if the fault was in the tie-down harness or in the tie-down technique. I'm pretty sure that with proper tension the front wheel shouldn't shift sideways (bike topples) and/or the forks shouldn't turn (leaving room so bike shifts forward and slackens tie down straps, then topples). A front wheel chock or similar bracing would prevent the front wheel from moving at all.
 
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