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Discussion Starter #1
I am thinking about getting a new burgman but can't decide which one.

The 650 feels better to me. I am use to riding large bikes but my wife says she is interested in learning to ride.

She is short and the 400 feels better to her.

She had a bad experience on a motorcycle when she was young and I'm not sure she will ever ride on the street.

Does anyone think that the 400 is to much for her to learn on.

I have not ridden one yet myself so I have no ideal how hard it will be for her to learn on.

let me know what you think.
 

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Hello Court Jester,

I just had a similar discussion with a friend. Your wife's experiences are quite common. A new rider has to feel in control and most important comfortable enough so the joy of riding enters their blood. Too bad she had a bad experience and feels that way about riding. Has she taken a certified riders course?

The answer to your question regarding the 400 is yes. The 400 is a wonderful vehicle for a beginner and is quite capable of handling touring as well. Lots of participants of this site love their 400's and I think the 650 maybe too unwiedly for her but more what you are looking for. I have bought the 650 as well because I feel its a more capable mount for some of the touring I plan to do this summer. My feeling is you would find this as well. You may have to buy both.
 

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Court Jester said:
I am thinking about getting a new burgman but can't decide which one.

[snipped]I have not ridden one yet myself so I have no ideal how hard it will be for her to learn on.

let me know what you think.
Hi CJ (you are joking aren't you! :D )

First of all - welcome to the forum :hello2:

Now then you are only going to buy one! Mmmm. If your significant other had a bad experience AND is really enthused at being on 2 wheels again (and we all understand why! :wink: ) - then get a 400 she will love it!

Why?

First, it is comfortable, light, stable and manoeuvrable.
Second it has 'enough' power, that comes on song in a 'controllable manner in otherwords it does not have a crazy amount of power to tempt you into silly stunts.
Third, it is practical - it is handy for popping down to the local store AND it has the built in storage to haul it all back EASILY (if not a top box is easily fitted).
Fourth, it is has great brakes (combination) which are really well balanced and really haul the machine to an impressive stop.
Fifth - it is fun - you (she) will invent all sorts of excuses for getting in the saddle.
Sixth: If you are reasonably happy with a wrench home based servicing is easy.

Drawbacks
1. - it is not a 650 and serious 2 up touring may be asking too much of it - but it ain't out of the question!
2. You may wish to buy a 650 as well!!

Having said all of that there are 3 milestones before you should consider purchase:

1. Both have a look at the options (in the flesh), sit on them and check you fit and can both flatfoot it while sitting on the saddle.
2. Invest in quality training - applies to everybody but especially those who have had a bad experience because it will help to restore confidence as old skills are sharpened and new ones learned.
3. Get a test drive if you can.

Good luck CJ (get your SO to have a browse here too) and lets us know how you get on! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I was planning to buy a 650 also if she learns to ride and likes it.

We have already set on both and she feels she can handle the 400 better.

I have a test ride schedule if the weather ever cooperates.

We will need 2 bikes or a sidecar because my daughter is not going to be left out.

She is 10 and wants a scooter so she can learn to ride around the house, any ideals.

I am hoping we can do some overnight camping trips this summer.

There looks to be plenty of room to carry every thing we need.

Anyone done much camping with these, I would like to know.
 

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CJ, good grief, you all live just up the road from our Triad Scooter Group. We meet every wednesday for breakfast. Too bad we didn't get with you a week or so ago when it was in the high 60's. Would have been a fine time to introduce you two to the Burgs.

If you'd like to meet some of us, talk scoots, sit on em, and if you are a current cycle rider you can take mine for a spin. Gonna be tough to get a good weather day tho. Another alternative: I live down near Lexington, if you and spouse would like to come down to see&sit and play with my 400 you are welcome. Email me off line if you want to talk about it more.

Ohterwise, wecome to group.
 

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Ok ........I have to say it.......I agree with Norman :shock: .

You want your wife's experience to be pleasant. IF she does like it then I'm sure she will shortly decide that the 400 is hers and you have to get your own. This opens the door for the 650. If she doesnt like it then you have the 400 to trade in on a 650 (unless you're totally smitten with the 400 as well).

As far as camping goes , Lycheed or member in Japan frequently goes camping with his 650 and his significant other. I plan on doing some with mine and I'm In the process of getting the accessories which will allow me to do so.
 

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Court Jester:
I'll add my 2 cents here and say I agree with all the answers, and of course if you get together with Ted as he suggest that should settle any questions you may still have.
 

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This might be heresy here, but consider getting her a used 250 to start on. A Honda Helix comes to mind, but there are others available. A couple of reasons, at least to my way of thinking:
+ smaller, lighter, less juice (so it won't just take off like a bat out of heck)
+ cheaper, so if/when she crashes, no need for major heartbreak
+ sits low, so she will be able to flat foot it, unless she is quite small

Many women don't often feel the need to have all the bling when they start riding. After feeling confident on two wheels, that attitude can change rather quickly. Starting small and inexpensive gives her room to grow and the initial funds are considerably less. Not a Burgman answer, so I'll go hide until the stones and arrows die down.

Madonna
 

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Get her in the MSF Basic Rider Course. It'll give her the skills necessary to safely ride a bike and build some confidence. In most states, passing the Basic Rider Course you can get the motorcycle license endnorsement with not further testing and get discounts on insurance with many companies.

For more info on the NC MSF see :
http://mis.lenoir.cc.nc.us/~mcycle/
 

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I took the safety course after numerous failed teaching attempts by my husband. I was riding the bike the 1st day of the class (granted the class was only 2 days) However I rode 250's in the class and come home to ride a couple of 800 cc bikes. I just got my Burgie 400 last weekend and if I would have had it instead of the Volusia....man I would have been one happy mama. Anyhow, the 250's are about 50 pounds lighter than the Burgman 400. I would suggest the MSF course as everyone else has because it is a great class and taught me a lot. Then get the 400 if she feels comfortable when she sits on it. Test rides are a plus but some places you can't get them.
Good luck!!!!
 

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Madonna, I agree with you. Find a cheap Helix (hey, CJ..I know wheres theres a decent one for $2000 in Asheboro), or 250 Reflex which is a heck of nice scoot and will run all day at 65-70 mph. The Helix is a bit lower if one is short.
 

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I agree with Bill and Pinwheel. Sign up for the MSF course ASAP. It'll be a good experience for you both. And, it'll be a good indicator of how serious your wife may be about riding her own bike on the street before you buy a new Burgman (or Burgmans).
During my years as an instructor we had a number of students who bought bikes prior to taking the classes and once they found out what is involved, discovered that they really weren't ready to ride on their own. I'm sure most lost a good bit of money when they sold their bikes.
Don
 

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Glad everyone brought up the class. I had made the assumption that a MSF class was a given. I'm a great supporter of the safety training and am getting ready to take another beginner training in a couple of months. Every 5 years or so I go back to keep my skills in check. I may also do the advanced riders class. Those are great as they are on the road, so real world hazards everywhere. Especially here in the DC area!!

Madonna
 

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If she is really reluctant to ride, I would go with the used Helix idea or an used Reflex if she is tall enough.
 

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Court Jester said:
Does anyone think that the 400 is to much for her to learn on.
I have not ridden one yet myself so I have no ideal how hard it will be for her to learn on.
let me know what you think.
Hello Jester
My wife has been wanting to ride my 400 ever since we got it and I to was a little apprehensive about her handling it. She's 5 ft. 8 in. Anyway yesterday we had some really nice weather (not so today) and I rode my Bajaj 150 scooter and she rode the Burgman 400 and she did great. I did warn her however that the 400 was a heaver than the 150 and that it might take her by surprize on her stops or slow riding and with that knowledge (which came in very handy, she did have to catch it a time or two) but because she was aware of it she did great.
And now of course we have to try to find a way to get other 400 :roll:
 
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