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Discussion Starter #1
as a last winter project, I have done the following modification on my Burgman 650. first is the front flashers are now running lights, and flash OFF when turning. second, a microswitch was installed on the carburator idle stop pin, wich activates a relay and the rear stop light. it works very good.
The last modification was a turn signal beeper controlled by the same relay as the brake light. This way when stopped, the sound of the beeper is OFF and not anoying. As soon as I accelerate the beeper sounds again until flashers are turned off. Its great. But required much more then I originally expected. Could send more technical details on request.
 

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Please do, I would very much like to know what was involved, specifically the details of the circuit, part numbers of the parts used, etc.

Some very good ideas there, mate!
 

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Marc - those are GREAT safety mods! It would be nice if they were factory provided. You have my admiration!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
more info. on those 3 mod.

:wink:
I will take some time to write a more detailled report on the whole project and I believe I took a picture of the mounted switch with the bracket.
This could be a long text , don't know if it should be posted here or a copy sent on request.
 

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Whatever the case... please include me in the post. I too would like to know about these things.
 

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That is very cool. Pass it around to everyone! 8)

Steve

Gear up!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
well here is a better description of the project.

:wink:
Safety modification

I first removed all covers from the front of the bike. Good thing I had the service manual.

Running light mod: 2 automotive relays with sockets where added behind the dash. They where purchased at a electronic surplus store . You need 12 volt coil and one normally closed contact on each relay.
Power going trough the contact comes from the same power source as the flashers themselves, so it is fuse protected. The positive wires going to the front turn signal bulbs where cut and now feeds the coil of each relay. Since the contact is normally closed, (power goes trough) the turn signals remain ON at all time . Activating the flasher will activate the relay and make the light go off. The ground wire for the relay coil was taken by a near by main ground cable ( there are a lot in the harness ).
I felt confident about the result, but surprise ! when first tested, the flasher where going much faster than originally . The reason is that the original flasher unit from Suzuki, is electronic and monitors the total wattage consumed when flashing . If a bulb burns, the units flashes more rapidly to indicate a burnt bulb. I liked that feature and did not want to replace it by a standard flasher unit. The relays used much less power then the bulbs, so I added more load by connecting an extra small bulb to each side relay. These extra bulbs will eventually end up as side flasher/markers on the bike as soon as I find what color lens is legal.

The flasher reminder (beeper) : also purchased from the same surplus store. The “buzzer” is fed by the 2 same sources as the coils of the flasher relays above, but first goes trough separate contacts of the added brake relay. Since they would end up on the same positive terminal of the “buzzer” , I knew this would be a problem making both side flasher go ON at once. My option was 2 beepers or 2 diodes (electrical one ways ) to prevent retun to the other side . I went with the diodes . Cheaper, smaller and I had some in my project box . Make sure they are rated for enough amps.

How it works: the brake relay is a 4 contact relay, with each, an open or closed position. The coil is activated via a micro-switch located at the throttle body (Where the accelerator cables ends up.) (like a carburator)
When the throttle is fully closed, the micro-switch is depressed and sends voltage to the relay (power comes from the brake light fuse) opening 2 of the contacts and preventing the pulsating voltage from the flasher unit to reach the “buzzer”. Very relaxing on an ever lasting red light! A slight twist of the throttle would deactivate the relay and close the contacts, turning the “buzzer” ON, reminding you to turn them OFF. The “Buzzer” is loud enough to warn pedestrians on a street corner, and just enough to be heard on the fast lane with a full face helmet. From the same throttle controlled relay, voltage to the rear brake lights is sent or not, using a 3rd. set of contact. (leaving one set unused).
First testing was a success, but later one evening , double-checking the electrical prints, I realized it would be possible to start the bike W/O holding any brake lever. This was not good , I wanted all original features to remain active. The problem would be coming from the computer receiving return voltage (feed back) in its brake monitoring . Normally, voltage is present here only when you press either brake switch , turning the brake light on, acknowledged by the computer and letting you start the bike. But now, with my modification, voltage is present on the brake light circuit as soon as you turn the ignition switch ON , and the brake light activates, feeding back into the computer. Again a diode was used in the circuit to prevent this backflow of voltage.
Now everything is under control. Most of the components are located in the left glove compartment, even the “buzzer” which is loud enough to be heard from the outside.

As soon as I am back from Germany for technical training, pictures and a simple electrical drawing will be posted.
Marc
 

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There is much easer way to get the front turn signal to work as running light without doing what Marc did, I too tried something similar to what he did and also experience original flasher unit causing the light to flash much faster as the stock does monitors the total wattage much the same way cars do when one bulb is out. The way I got my up front turn light to be running light was much easer to me except taking off the mirrows to install the new duel filaments sockets, what I did was to get a pair of rear running brake lights socket which are duel filament and replace the front with these. I use the brighter side of the duel socket for the turn signal (rear brake light) and the dim filament is the running light, connect the turn signal to the original front turn signal wires and run one wire from either the left or right rear running light to power the two front running lights I also wire in a switch in between so I have control to turn them off and on if I choose.

Marc please do not think I am saying what you did is not good or it's wrong but I rather not put any strain on the original wiring system and prefer to run new wires for each mods this way if there is a problem I can isolate the problem by process of elimination and so far with a total of 18 new light that includes a number of simple 5volts leds to 65 watts frog lights not to mention the other electrical mods I have and not a problem so far.
 

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I am confused

marc giroux said:
second, a microswitch was installed on the carburator idle stop pin, wich activates a relay and the rear stop light.
I assumed this was like a deceleration tail light switch?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
running lights

in reponse to Roy, yes you could call it a deceleration brake light switch.

to Roger's comment, thanks for your input. I guess there are many roads to Rome. I also looked at that option, but I drive a Grand caravan and here in Canada they use the high output filament of the front flasher as daytime runlight. and it is really noticeable. This is why I choosed the way I did it . I did not have to modify the front flasher socket, but mostly I get a much more visible light using the higher wattage of the original bulb. since visibility was my first concern this explains my choice. Also having to add those 2 extra bulbs on the relay (not intended at first) will also add to visibility once mounted to the side of the front fairing. Now I don't know how long the front flasher bulbs will last, since they are not intended to be on at all time. We will see!
 
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