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Discussion Starter #1
Today, I was able to take my new 650 out for the first time since riding it home last Thursday. I love it! I had more fun on it than I can remember in a long time.
The handling was great. It seemed like I only had to think about leaning the bike for a curve or swerve and the bike responded with no effort.
I've adjusted to the freewheeling just before you making a complete stop (followed someone's post about just giving it a little throttle as the freewheeling kicks in). I know at a couple of stops on my first ride home from the dealers, I felt like a novice and kept looking around to see if anyone noticed my sloppy stops.
I especially like using the engine braking to slow prior to turns and when entering curves. I ran a nice set of twisties not far from my home and just used the throttle to slow and accelerate thru the curves. It is a much smoother method than having to get off the throttle, brake and then back on the throttle in turns and curves like I've been used to on my prior bikes.
Thanks again guys for all your help and info that helped me decide to buy the Burgman. You didn't steer me wrong. :D
 

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throttleing

Then let's say you are going 50 mph and you let off on the throttle the bike will slow down just like you it in #1 or#2 gear in a standerd transmission? I just got my new 650 and I'm haveing troble learning how to handle that cut off of power. Any in put would be appreciated thank you Mert
 

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Re: throttleing

mert said:
and I'm haveing troble learning how to handle that cut off of power. Any in put would be appreciated thank you Mert
I really don't have a suggestion, but I had the same problem adjusting to this as well when I first got my 650. I believe the tranny loosened up a bit over time and the downshift is not as intense as it was when new (or/and) I naturally adjusted to this over time.
 

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Re: throttleing

gwashington said:
mert said:
and I'm haveing troble learning how to handle that cut off of power. Any in put would be appreciated thank you Mert
I really don't have a suggestion, but I had the same problem adjusting to this as well when I first got my 650. I believe the tranny loosened up a bit over time and the downshift is not as intense as it was when new (or/and) I naturally adjusted to this over time.
What you have to do is actually apply a little throttle as the machine is slowing down. The second thing you can do is before you close the throttle or roll out of it just put it into manual and the sudden gearing down is less severe. When you come to a full stop just push the D/M button again and you're back in auto.

The large amount of engine breaking on this machine takes a little to get used to. You will have it under control in a matter of weeks or days.
 

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I agree with Allwalk. I find if you give throttle whilst you are braking and only let off just as you're about to put your foot down it is much smoother to handle.
 

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I agree with Allan, I got used to it pretty quick. In many circumstances I don't chop the throttle all the way closed when I want to slow down, but I roll it up and down kind of like a rheostat switch. The engine braking is really useful on curvy hilly roads - I use just the engine to adjust speed much of the time, which is much smoother than braking before curves.

When coming to a stop in urban traffic conditions, I feather the throttle until I want the transmission to disengage, and I always have a little brake on at the disengagement point (7 mph). That alleviates the lurch into freewheeling mode, which I found to be very disconcerting the first few days that I rode the scooter. If I have a car behind me I also lightly apply my brakes a time or two to flash my brake lights.

It sounds like a lot to do, but it really becomes automatic. It is just a different riding technique, to work with the way the machine is designed. I would probably like the 650 less if it had too little engine braking...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I agree with Paul's techniques (now that I think back, it may have been one of his prior posts that gave me the clues to smooth stops). At 50 mph (or most speeds) I don't suddenly "chop" the throttle. Like Paul, I roll the throttle on and off like a rheostat which makes for very smooth transitions and minimizes the need to use the brakes in most situations.
The trick is to always be aware of road conditions or what's happening well ahead of your path of travel so you can take advantage of the Burgman's drivetrain braking and keep adjusting your speed with the throttle to meet the changing conditions without having to suddenly roll off the throttle. Now, after about 250 miles of experience on my 650, I really like the drivetrain braking and look at it as another advantage of our bikes that provides a great riding experience. :D
 
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